GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-18) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Opioid makers made payments to one in 12 U.S. doctors
128 points by metheus
https://news.brown.edu/articles/2017/08/opioids-influence
___________________________________________________________________
 
robmiller - 23 minutes ago
There is an irony here that the US invaded Afghanistan, the world's
largest opium exporter[1].[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium_production_in_Afghanista...
 
ransom1538 - 16 minutes ago
Feel free to browse doctors' opioid counts here.  I was able to
match them to their actual profiles.  Take into account their
field, but, even with that the numbers are ridiculous.   If you are
in "Family Practice" and prescribe opioids 9167 times per year you
probably have a very sore
hand.https://www.opendoctor.io/opioid/highest/
 
gayprogrammer - 56 minutes ago
>> Q: What connection might there be between drug-maker payments to
physicians and the current opioid use epidemic?The article is pure
speculation. They did not correlate the payments made to doctors
with the prescriptions those doctors made, nor even more broadly
with national prescription rates.This article just makes the
implied assumption that doctors push pills onto patients. I don't
discount that at one time doctors may have been incentivized to
play it fast and loose with pain pills, but those days are LONG
gone now.I would like to see research on the population in terms of
predisposition to addiction and susceptibility to chemical
dependence.
 
elipsey - 4 hours ago
Reminds me of what Rostand said about murder: "Kill one man, and
you are a murderer. Kill millions of men, and you are a conqueror.
Kill them all, and you are a god."Sell one oxycontin and you're
drug dealer; sell a million and you're a C level.
 
  erdewit - 3 hours ago
  31 billion$ earned on the sale of
  oxycontin...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxycodone#History
 
  bostik - 2 hours ago
  That can be generalised.Petty thieves break the law. Mafiosos
  skirt and avoid the law. The real kingpins write the law.
 
  esterly - 38 minutes ago
  Agreed.  When a C level is profiting it is hard to change course.
  The onion nails it http://www.theonion.com/article/sweating-
  shaking-pharmaceuti...
 
ddebernardy - 3 hours ago
Is this really news? John Oliver ran a piece on the topic and the
industry's many other dubious practices over 2 years ago, and I'm
quite sure he wasn't the first to try to raise
awareness.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQZ2UeOTO3I
 
  tylersmith - 13 minutes ago
  Not everyone watches John Oliver. Lots of things you and I know
  would be news to a lot people and many things they know would be
  news to us.
 
liveoneggs - 3 hours ago
check your doctor: https://openpaymentsdata.cms.gov/
 
  jws - 55 minutes ago
  My doctor had 16 payments in 2016. Mostly in the $10-$13 range
  for food and drink. Looks like a rep paying for lunch at the
  medical center cafeteria. Sounds a lot like "ok, I want to hear
  about your product, but I'm not giving up billable hours for it,
  so talk at lunch".I'm not sure how doctors think, but there is no
  meal you can buy me that would make me go hear about your product
  if I didn't want to hear about your product.
 
  api_or_ipa - 1 hours ago
  This really should be more widely known.  TIL my doctor got a
  meal + beverages worth $130.  Seems reasonable compared to the
  national average of over $3k.
 
    tylersmith - 1 hours ago
    When I was younger I was prescribed Paxil and strongly
    encouraged to stick with it despite horrible side effects.
    Brain shocks, hateful feelings, and definitely horrible
    depression to name a few of the non-personal ones. I still have
    them occasionally 6 years later. I eventually ran away from my
    old life, moved across the country, and eventually stopped the
    Paxil and eventually got better but not after burning a ton of
    bridges. After this site came out I found the doctor had been
    given nearly $30k from Glaxo Smith Kline over a few years.
 
11thEarlOfMar - 3 hours ago
I don't like the 'pigs at the trough' image of this type of report.
There are almost certainly pigs, but there is much more to
resolving it than just revoking some licenses or throwing some
people in jail.Standard practice in business of all types is to
take clients out for a meal to talk business. Usually, the meal
setting enables a different type of legitimate, sober interaction.
Many types of business are conducted this way. Some companies have
policies that limit the value of what a salesperson can share with
a client, for example, Applied Materials limits the value of any
type of entertainment by a vendor to $100. This is good corporate
policy to inhibit undue influence by vendors.But it is not 'a
payment'.Likewise, it is pretty easy to see that pharma would want
a Dr. who is prescribing their medication and has a positive story
to tell to speak at one of their seminars. The Dr. might say that
his time is worth $x, and the Pharma needs to cover his travel
expenses, and then he'd consent to presenting. In this case, any
fees paid would be considered payment. The question is, how much is
being paid and does that payment present undue influence. Many
doctors are independent contractors and can choose to do this type
of activity without a policy to override or limit the value of it.
On the other hand, state medical boards which license physicians
should have policies that limit all medical and pharmaceutical
companies in how they can influence physicians.
 
  [deleted]
 
  tiggybear - 2 hours ago
  I think that is ridiculous.Learning about new medicine is
  continuing education for physicians. It is their job. Having a
  third party paying them or even just offering dinner to them so
  they can do their jobs is a huge conflict of interest.Further,
  they are getting a completely biased education on these new drugs
  in addition to being "taught" by pharma reps who often do not
  even have a BS in life sciences...so they are very limited in
  being able to relay nuanced medical information.
 
    bionoid - 15 minutes ago
    > Having a third party paying them or even just offering dinner
    to them so they can do their jobs is a huge conflict of
    interest.Not directly related, but my sister studied to become
    an audiologist some 15 years ago (in Norway). I was absolutely
    stunned at the corporate sponsorship - full on weekend trips
    with a nice hotel room and paid drinks and fun activities (plus
    a conference). Not once, but many times during the studies, for
    all students, sponsored by different companies (I'm not sure if
    they were competing companies, but you'd think so..)There must
    be a lot of money in hearing aid for that to make financial
    sense.. Is/was this type of sponsorship common for students in
    other areas, medical or elsewhere?
 
lr4444lr - 2 hours ago
Maybe it's because Americans just have this cognitive dissonance
that their trusted doctor could be any less than 100% conscientious
about their health, but we need to plainly face the fact that if
members of the press were able to write  expos?s about drug makers'
fudging the data about the addictiveness and effectiveness of their
products, that doctors with their medical training and
responsibility over actual people's lives should have proceeded
with more caution and not written scripts mindlessly to get rid of
every tiny pain patients had just because they kept asking for
something. It's just unconscionable.EDIT: this survey was also very
damning:  http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-
prescri...
 
  zjaffee - 1 hours ago
  Your ignoring the fact that up until recently, pain was
  considered to be the fifth vital sign and was just as important
  to treat as things like a fever.Medicine as a field is largely
  about removing discomfort, as many medical conditions could be
  relatively debilitating. Think how many times taking an
  ibuprofen/acetaminophen just made it possible for you to go on
  with your day, rather than needing to lay in bed in agony. For
  people with chronic pain, or those coming out of surgery,
  perceived recovery time can be a big thing for
  people.Additionally, the article didn't address the fact that it
  could very well be that doctors were being paid off to prescribe
  a particular brand of opioid rather than just opioids in general,
  something that is relatively common when there are a large number
  of drugs that can equally help treat a given ailment.
 
    rossjudson - 28 minutes ago
    As if "taking a kickback to promote a particular pharmaceutical
    company's products" isn't equally bad. Yeah -- BigPharma is
    going to account for the kickback under "Research and
    Development (Of Profit)".
 
    csr12928834 - 10 minutes ago
    The problem in my mind, that the parent is intimating at, is
    that we confer far too much control to and assume far too much
    competence and beneficence on the part of physicians.I am not
    saying they are a corrupt class, nor would I mean to imply
    that. But I do think we need to think of physicians as a part
    of health care, rather than at the top of it.The entire drug
    regulation system is predicated on the idea that you have
    certain providers, namely physicians, who are competent to make
    decisions, and shifting that decision-making power to those
    providers protects us from harm.The opioid crisis has
    demonstrated that whole paradigm is faulty.The problem is that
    no one profession should be entrusted with that level of power
    or command over decisions.Imagine, instead, a system where
    there was no drug regulation. Rather than assuming that
    physicians were making the best decisions about opioid use and
    sweeping the problem under the rug, such use would be
    constantly scrutinized.We need more competition, and fewer
    gatekeepers. Gatekeeping means there's only one thing that
    needs to be breached.
 
    lr4444lr - 1 hours ago
    I think you're raising an interesting point, but I disagree
    with your example - what pain that is so bad its sufferer needs
    "to lay in bed in agony" can be relieved by ibuprofen,
    acetaminophen, or any other OTC pain reliever? The Great
    Binge[0] ended long ago - perhaps for the wrong reasons, but
    ended nonetheless, until recently when legal opioid
    prescriptions spiked.This is about doctors putting their
    patients at risk in the process of treating them for routine
    problems which did not result in opioid addiction rates as
    recently as 25 years ago, and certainly were not prescribed
    with any other side benefit as far as I've
    heard.[0]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Binge
 
      mnm1 - 1 hours ago
      Headaches can easily be that bad and relieved with ibuprofen.
      Otherwise yeah, it's lay in bed and try to sleep and hope
      they don't last into the next day.
 
lootsauce - 2 hours ago
I have two relatives that died from prescription opioid addiction
and abuse and I don't think a few payments here and there is what
motivates doctors to prescribe these drugs at a higher rate. Maybe
it does maybe not. The fact is they are powerful drugs that can
stop pain AND they make LOTS of money so they get pushed as the
best option.The thing that is in question in a doctors mind is, can
I say this is the best option. Thats what the face-time with reps,
meals, conferences etc are doing, giving the MD a perception that
this is best practice. It's the professional cover to prescribe
what everyone knows is a highly addictive and dangerous narcotic.If
the same kind of money were spent on informing, reminding and
reminding again, face-time with addiction prevention advocates,
conferences on the opioid epidemic, payments for speaking on
alternatives to opioids for pain treatment, giving doctors the
facts about these drugs, the addiction and death rates, the impact
on families and communities of the inevitable proportion of people
who will become addicted and of those who will die, it will be much
much harder to say this is a best practice.But even then doctors
are pushed hard to deal with as many patients as possible. A quick
answer that deals with the immediate problem is what the patient
wants and its all the doc has time and support from the system to
give. This situation lends itself to the potential for those who
truly benefit, the makers of these drugs, to take advantage of the
situation and push drugs they know will make people addicted
leading to higher use and profits. Lost lives and destroyed
families be damned.
 
vkou - 1 hours ago
Not related to payments, but related to opioids:My father broke his
thumb a few weeks ago, while operating a woodchipper. After getting
a cast, he went to see a specialist, who recommended that K-wires
be surgically installed - small metal rods that go into his thumb,
until it heals, at which point they will be pulled out.He got local
anesthetic, got the wires installed, and got sent home. Because he
lives in Canada, they gave him nothing for the pain. Two days
later, the pain died down, and he's now waiting for the bones to
heal.In America, I can't imagine that doctor would get many
positive reviews from his patients, for not prescribing
painkillers. Market forces would push him towards over-
prescribing... And statistically, some of his patients will become
addicted.
 
  rayuela - 1 hours ago
  What? You've responded to a rigorous research paper with a
  completely baseless guess of what America might be like...
 
  mnm1 - 1 hours ago
  Sounds like a shitty doctor. It takes longer than two days on
  weak opiates to get addicted and the doctor knows that.
 
oleg123 - 6 hours ago
bribes - or payments?
 
  diogenescynic - 4 hours ago
  In America it's all the same. Or you can call it 'lobbying' if
  you really want to dress it up.
 
    deelowe - 4 hours ago
    Doctor's aren't public officials. So no, you wouldn't call it
    that.
 
      alexandercrohde - 4 hours ago
      Doctors have taken an oath and have a public responsibility.
      They are liable for bad medical behavior (particularly if
      deliberate) [malpractice].So let's not quibble over
      semantics.
 
        outside1234 - 4 hours ago
        Believe it or not, this grew out of the threat of lawsuits
        if they DIDN'T prescribe opioids because they were ignoring
        the "5th vital sign" (pain).The real culprits here are the
        corporations - they should be liable for paying for the
        treatment of the folks addicted to the drugs they pushed.
 
          smackingly - 3 hours ago
          5th vital sign is urine output :)What is actually driving
          this is that income (and other hospital measures) is tied
          to patient satisfaction.  Don't want to lose 30k/year
          because I didn't give the patient what they want.I'm an
          inpatient physician (ICU), so I never prescribe chronic
          opioids, but I am pretty liberal with them in the
          hospital.  And no, I've never received a Panera lunch for
          the privilege of hearing about OxyContin.It's an
          extremely complex and difficult problem.  I think doctors
          are taking too much of the blame.  Maybe we should simply
          ban the use of chronic opioids for non-cancer pain (or
          other similar etiologies).  When I was a resident, I made
          all my patients sign an agreement that I would not
          prescribe chronic opioids unless they had metastatic
          cancer, were otherwise in a hospice facility, or I made a
          special exception.  Don't sign?  Then you find another
          doctor.I realize that will evoke some strong emotions
          from some of you, but you don't see the everyday begging
          from patients for more opioids when they obviously don't
          need them.  Some people with legit use-cases will suffer
          under such a scheme.  And that could drive up the use of
          heroin.There's no easy solution to this problem.
 
          DanBC - 3 hours ago
          > 5th vital sign is urine output :)US doctors began
          prescribing many more opioids after a campaign by the VA
          describing pain as the 5th vital sign. Doctors began
          having to ask people about pain, which meant they had to
          treat that pain. The VA also said that opioids are not
          addictive when used to treat pain. They're not so
          addictive when used to treat acute pain, but they're more
          addictive when used to treat chronic pain. Very many more
          people got opioids to treat chronic pain because of this 
          campaign.https://www.va.gov/PAINMANAGEMENT/docs/Pain_As_t
          he_5th_Vital...https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/
          PMC1924634/> It's an extremely complex and difficult
          problem. I think doctors are taking too much of the
          blame.A lot of americans get opioids from doctors.https:/
          /www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/prescribing.html> An
          estimated 1 out of 5 patients with non-cancer pain or
          pain-related diagnoses are prescribed opioids in office-
          based settings> However, primary care providers account
          for about half of opioid pain relievers dispensed.Some
          states have between 93 and 143 opioid prescriptions per
          100 people!!
 
          smackingly - 3 hours ago
          Yeah it was kind of an inside joke, as urine output is
          really important in critically ill patients and I have to
          constantly remind my residents and nurses of that.As for
          the VA's campaign: yes, I remember it.  And it's why we
          have those emoji scorecards all over the hospital.  Which
          doctors never use.  My subjective opinion is that we
          still vastly under-treat pain in the acute-care
          setting.And I could talk all day long about how stupid
          the VA health system is.
 
          Retric - 3 hours ago
          I was given strong Opioids (Hydromorphone etc) for less
          than 3 weeks after major surgery.  They clearly worked,
          but even that much exposure IMO was not worth the risk as
          I very quickly started to get cravings.Even without
          getting high, freedom from pain is a ridiculously
          powerful motivator.  And because they have such strong
          peaks and valleys you make a very strong association with
          those pills.
 
          alexandercrohde - 2 hours ago
          I was given a 30 day supply of oxy-something when I had
          my wisdom teeth removed. I needed 0 of the pills.
 
          tylersmith - 46 minutes ago
          People have different pain tolerances and if you wait
          until it's at that point to get a prescription you'll
          have a real bad time. But 30 days is certainly more than
          necessary. They should do a few days and make it easy to
          get more for a couple weeks. Then require seeing the
          patient again for evaluation.
 
          alexandercrohde - 4 hours ago
          Well if the root is the corporation, I think civil suits
          have proven ineffective at preventing such abuses.I
          wonder if the answer may be criminal suits and a greater
          emphasis on whistleblowing. Most people I know would rat
          out their company's immoral/illegal behavior for a
          million dollars.
 
        dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
        > They are liable for bad medical behavior (particularly if
        deliberate)Malpractice is in many senses a reduced standard
        of negligence liability compared to that faced by the
        general public, since it turns on established professional
        practice in the field not objective reasonableness in the
        circumstances.
 
refurb - 3 hours ago
This should be kept in context.  Let's say the manufacturer
presented new data at a conference.  During that presentation they
provided lunch and refreshments.  Everyone of those doctors that
attended will now show up in the CMS database.Do we think that a
$15 lunch is going to influence a physician to over-prescribe a
drug?
 
  maxxxxx - 3 hours ago
  I honestly think it makes a difference. People don't necessarily
  think about the monetary value of something. It's like paying for
  employees' lunches every day. At $10 each the cost is 5104=
  $200/month. I am pretty sure they will be more excited about free
  lunch than $200/month more.
 
  rdtsc - 3 hours ago
  Sure free lunch has always been seen as a perk even for the
  supposedly rational and logical people like programmers (being
  slightly sarcastic there). I've heard of people going for a lower
  paying jobs and citing free lunch as deciding factor.Moreover
  there are other ways to influence doctors. In some states they
  have to pass certifications or exams for continued education.
  Pharma companies would pay the companies writing the tests to
  insert names of their drugs in there.There are speaking fees and
  other such things. Eventually the law catches up but by then they
  find a new loophole.
 
    slededit - 1 hours ago
    Getting lunch from your employer isn't the same and doesn't
    cause a conflict of interest.  Its not about the lunch but
    rather who the lunch is coming from.If you worked for google
    and Uber was buying your lunches then there would be a conflict
    of interest.
 
  Retric - 3 hours ago
  They would not be providing lunch if it did not work.
  Advertising demonstrates how easy people are swayed by
  subconscious connections.
 
    smackingly - 3 hours ago
    Yeah, but I'm not sure how much of an effect it has on the
    quantity of opioids prescribed.  Drug lunches probably
    influenced which drug I prescribe (for some reason Norco was
    the most popular oral opioid in our hospital, maybe because it
    only has 2 syllables).  Though I've never attended an opioid
    lunch.
 
      09bjb - 3 hours ago
      Free lunches, pens, merchandise, cruises...all of these
      tactics work and have proven ROI for the drug manufacturers.
      They've known for years that they're worthwhile investments.
      It's not really the doctor's fault, it's just reality until
      there's stricter regulation.
 
        tylersmith - 50 minutes ago
        It is absolutely a doctor's fault if they prescribe
        medications that are unnecessary because of kickbacks.
 
      tylersmith - 52 minutes ago
      Norco is common because it's a mild opioid that is able to
      treat the majority of "intermediate" pains. If your pain can
      be treated with ibuprofen you don't need urgent care. If it
      can't then Norco is the lightest alternative most likely to
      help.
 
  tylersmith - 59 minutes ago
  Why not? When my wife worked at an insurance agency they always
  refered people to mechanics/etc that stopped by and gave them
  candy every few months. Not all doctors handle their profession
  with the respect and care we'd like.
 
  analog31 - 3 hours ago
  They could eliminate the suspicion by not buying lunch.A relative
  of mine was a pharma salesman. She had a database with the lunch
  preferences for every doctor on her circuit, and bought several
  lunches a day.
 
  rasz - 55 minutes ago
  Except you organize that conference in Hawaii, all expenses paid.
 
  svachalek - 3 minutes ago
  Cognitive dissonance actually means that a small payment can be
  stronger than a large one. If you accept a large payment to
  listen to a pitch, it's easy to tell yourself it's just for the
  money. If it's not enough to believe that, then you must actually
  be interested in hearing about it.