GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Despite S.E.C. Warning, Wave of Initial Coin Offerings Grows
155 points by JumpCrisscross
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/business/dealbook/initial-coi...
___________________________________________________________________
 
blhack - 41 minutes ago
To put it into perspective, the tezos ICO recently raised a little
more than $200,000,000 worth of BTC and ETH.Here's their twitter:
https://twitter.com/tez0s?lang=enHere's their subreddit:
https://reddit.com/r/tezosHere's their website: https://tezos.comIt
doesn't look like they have really updated anybody on what they're
doing with $200,000,000 since their ICO closed.
 
  [deleted]
 
api - 4 hours ago
Is there an honest non-scummy way to raise capital through this
mechanism for something without an inherent scarcity built into the
system and that doesn't carry nasty future litigation risks (or at
least doesn't carry them more than a SAFE or a convertible note)?My
impression so far is no but I could be wrong.
 
  wmf - 2 hours ago
  CoinList/SAFT is supposed to be that but it hasn't been revealed
  yet.
 
  joosters - 4 hours ago
  None so far. There's plenty of crowdfunding sites that could be
  used instead, but ICOs allow the companies to raise money before
  they even produce a beta of their software. They also have no
  investor protection, so the company has no obligations to
  deliver. Finally, these people know that there is a pool of
  investors out there who think that crypto coins are bound to
  increase in value, so they will throw money at any new coin.
 
    [deleted]
 
d3vnet - 4 hours ago
So how about making investors explicitly state that they are not US
persons?
 
  jraines - 3 hours ago
  Most do this now and it's porous to say the least
 
  SkyMarshal - 16 minutes ago
  https://www.bitcoinsuisse.ch/ has emerged as the goto service for
  id verification of ICO investors, and is used to block US
  investors when required.
 
  polotics - 4 hours ago
  Makes no difference I think. Burden of proof is on the emitter.
  Matt Levine at Bloomberg has it explained perfectly: The ICO
  emitters seem to have no idea that  once the SEC declares an ICO
  to be a security, any US-person investor who had put their money
  in such an unregistered security and lost some, is entitled by
  the full force of the law to all of their $, paid back in full...
 
    rothbardrand - 4 hours ago
    All of their $ or all of their ETH?  Most ICOs don't take $.
 
      JumpCrisscross - 3 hours ago
      > All of their $ or all of their ETH? Most ICOs don't take $.
      replyDoesn't matter. Delaware law has allowed contributions
      "in kind," e.g. with labour. When something goes wrong, the
      promoter has to pay cash restitution, penalties and, often,
      legal fees.Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal
      nor securities advice.
 
whytaka - 32 minutes ago
How exactly are ICOs performed?1) Set up mining software.2) Start
running it on your own machines and mine enough tokens for ICO.3)
Sell tokens. Profit. ??Are investors at some point invited to run
the mining chain on their own machines? Surely they don't just
trust that the company raising money will do manage the accounting
on their own.
 
  xur17 - 31 minutes ago
  In a lot of cases ICOs are built on top of the ethereum network,
  so no mining is necessary. Transaction fees are paid in Ether,
  and the ICO / token is setup as an Ethereum contract.
 
  alistproducer2 - 29 minutes ago
  Most are ERC20[0] tokens with a promise to convert them to the
  projects native token when their blockchain is stood up.[0]:
  https://theethereum.wiki/w/index.php/ERC20_Token_Standard
 
anovikov - 4 hours ago
Most ICOs usually exclude Americans. Because these scamsters know
it's a bad idea to get Uncle Sam angry.
 
  joosters - 4 hours ago
  Bizarrely, some of these non-American ICOs still advertise in the
  US. I can't remember the exact ICOs, but some have paid for
  billboard ads, taxi ads, and so on. I suspect that the 'no
  Americans' is just a tickbox that they know is easy for their
  investors to ignore.
 
    anovikov - 3 hours ago
    Absolutely. Not much different from 'i am over 18' checkbox on
    a porn site.
 
    kristofferR - 3 hours ago
    Yeah, EOS had both a Times Square ad and a no US investor
    policy:
    https://twitter.com/jeffscottward/status/879434713114578946
 
      hammock - 1 hours ago
      There might be more foreigners in Times Square than
      Americans, actually.
 
ringaroundthetx - 4 hours ago
Even the SEC realizes that not all token sales are securities. Some
people in the industry simply aren't getting it, they are creating
a straw man which the agency isn't even arguing for.> The agency
said that it would focus on coins that should be categorized as
securities.So there are all these people on the periphery just
HOPING for their prophecy of a heavy handed government breaking the
cryptocurrency rush.They read the headlines.They create the
headlines.They purposefully don't read the SEC report or consider
any information to the contrary of what they are expecting.Despite
S.E.C. WARNING? This is an article about everyone getting smarter
and restructuring their offering where necessary, and continuing to
move forward.Even the WARNING in the SEC's DAO report two weeks ago
acknowledged that not all token offerings were securities. But
detractors and regulated entities with a legitimate reason to be
skittish, used it as the WELP SHOW'S OVER GUYS argument which is
completely unfounded.> Nick Morgan, formerly a lawyer in the
S.E.C.?s enforcement division, said that the security label was
likely to apply to any coin that an investor buys with the
expectation that it will increase in value as a result of the
efforts of the entrepreneurs who created it.The SEC still answers
to the courts, and this consolidation of capital will allow these
new organizations to take it to the courts efficiently. The Howey
test from the 1940s did not consider this kind of asset to ever
exist. It isn't an end all be all, it is a test.The SEC is not
mandated by Congress to undermine interstate commerce, it is
created to provide confidence. So far, they've been playing it
smart.
 
  wmf - 4 hours ago
  It looks like around 90% of ICOs are securities and
  "restructuring" them to not be securities would probably make
  them unprofitable and thus pointless. The only way for most ICOs
  to comply with SEC regulations is to not exist.
 
    ringaroundthetx - 4 hours ago
    while simultaneously reaffirming that regulated broker-dealers
    can trade securitized tokens that are properly registered
    bringing trillions of dollars into the crypto space overnight
    when TD Ameritrade and ETrade starts trading these.
 
      akvadrako - 1 hours ago
      The issue is that they can't really do that without going
      public. And then why bother?
 
  kgwgk - 4 hours ago
  Matt Levine, today:
  https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-08-08/ico-
  risks..."To me, it seems odd that people would pay millions of
  dollars to reserve space on a new cloud storage network, and
  obvious that they're really paying that money for a speculative
  investment.""If you do an illegal securities offering, people who
  bought your securities have a right to get their money back. If
  token prices keep rising everywhere, this is not a big concern --
  why would anyone want their money back when they have such
  valuable cloud storage? But if the ICO mania fades, expect a lot
  of lawsuits from investors who are shocked to learn that they
  were buying unregistered securities."
 
    graedus - 2 hours ago
    Off-topic, sorry: Levine gets a lot of praise around here, and
    he does have a great talent for breaking down complex finance
    topics so that they're easy to understand and often
    entertaining to read about.  That being said, sometimes he is
    awfully sanguine about bank misconduct and crimes.  Edit: from
    the article:"A bank that keeps very careful track of how much
    money it has, and who owes it money and whom it owes money, and
    sometimes does evil stuff with that knowledge -- that's fine,
    really."
 
      joosters - 2 hours ago
      That's an unfair quote, taken completely out of context. His
      articles frequently cover fraud and illegality in the
      financial markets, and he's never in favour of it.The quote
      in question was pointing out how bad the latest Wells Fargo
      scandal is. A bank that can't keep track of money is in
      serious trouble and is woefully incompetent. The banks
      ripping off customers but accounting for the profits are
      evil, but at least they are being competent.
 
        graedus - 2 hours ago
        I think even with the broader context it doesn't sit right
        with me, because he could have easily made the completely
        serious and valid point about banks needing to be competent
        at their core functions without characterizing "doing evil
        stuff sometimes" as "fine".  Totally possible that my
        sarcasm detector is broken right now but it seems like he's
        "only half-joking" here (another of his favorite phrases).
 
      stickfigure - 2 hours ago
      It's his trademark sarcasm, and the subtle hilarity is one of
      the reasons I read his daily newsletter. That quote requires
      more context:You're supposed to know where the money is! That
      knowledge and reliability is the central function of the
      bank; getting the dumb spreadsheets right is more important
      than moral probity. A bank that keeps very careful track of
      how much money it has, and who owes it money and whom it owes
      money, and sometimes does evil stuff with that knowledge --
      that's fine, really. A bank that sometimes forgets who owes
      what to whom is the real menace.
 
    ringaroundthetx - 4 hours ago
    Everybody and their brother with a soundboard has stated an
    opinion about ICOs and the SEC guidance. Literally anyone
    influential has said something and if they haven't, expect them
    to say it tomorrow.The gradient of opinions is just as abstract
    as the weeks before.It would be a mistake to take that as
    canonical just because you respect that particular
    entrepreneur's non sequitur criticism of existing token sales.
    When the argument is that not all token sales are securities
    offerings, not even the SEC has made that mistake, and the
    argument is that new token sales don't have to be securities
    offerings, but they can be too.Here is what the SEC will never
    get: they will never get investor protection from this asset
    class. Their entire regulatory framework is around
    that.Congress can modify the SEC's mandate to support this.
    Congress can create a completely new agency and regulatory
    framework to provide for more applicable confidence and
    protections in this asset class.The SEC will never ever ever
    use the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act
    of 1934 as currently written to ensure a fair market of all
    cryptographic token issuances.
 
      JumpCrisscross - 3 hours ago
      > The SEC will never ever ever use the Securities Act of 1933
      and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as currently written
      to ensure a fair market of all cryptographic token
      issuancesIf the SEC categories an asset as a security, it has
      rule making powers over the trading of those assets provided
      an American buys or sells the asset, inadvertently or not.
      Many respected lawyers and lawmakers, as well as the SEC, say
      many ICOs look like securities.Note that coins offered in
      ICOs being securities isn't a death knell to the concept.
      Just to the scammy elements of the market.Disclaimer: I am
      not a lawyer. This is not legal nor securities advice. Don't
      be a dummy and treat Internet comments as anything but casual
      banter.
 
        ringaroundthetx - 3 hours ago
        > Many respected lawyers and lawmakers, as well as the SEC,
        say many ICOs look like securities.Yes, this is the crux of
        everything I've said, primarily that "many" has nothing to
        do with whats possible. Whether a future token sale chooses
        to register as a security or is completely exempt from
        securities frameworks because it is a product.
 
          JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
          > Whether a future token sale chooses to register as a
          security or is completely exempt from securities
          frameworks because it is a productThe "many" I refer to
          are the people get to decide, legally, whether it's a
          security or a product. The polite thing for the SEC to do
          would be to announce a new rule. The less polite route,
          though still completely legal, would be to prosecute
          under the Acts in an SEC court [1].[1]
          https://www.wsj.com/articles/sec-fights-challenges-to-
          its-in...
 
  JumpCrisscross - 3 hours ago
  > This is an article about everyone getting smarter and
  restructuring their offering where necessary, and continuing to
  move forwardThe article specifically states "only three projects
  have said they are canceling or postponing the sale of coins
  because of the warning." It's not a doom and gloom article. It's
  just saying the vast majority of ICOs are (a) probably
  noncompliant and (b) doing nothing about it.> the SEC still
  answers to the courtsThe SEC is an independent agency [1].
  Congress delegated to it the Congresses' powers to make rules in
  and around securities with the Securities Act of 1934, as amended
  [2]. Courts grant agencies, like the SEC, wide rule-making
  authority [3]. In any case, the SEC "answers to" the courts in
  the same way the Congress does.> the SEC is not mandated by
  Congress to undermine interstate commerceThe SEC is a creature of
  the federal government. Its specific jurisdiction is interstate
  commerce. In fact, one way to get around some SEC rules (though
  not all--consult a lawyer before doing something stupid) is to
  exclusively conduct your business within a single state.[1] https
  ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_agencies_of_the_Un...[2] htt
  ps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securities_Exchange_Act_of_193...[3] h
  ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Mobil_Corp._v._Saudi_Bas...Dis
  laimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal nor securities
  advice.
 
    ringaroundthetx - 2 hours ago
    If you read the Securities Act of 1933 there are TONS of ways
    to get around SEC rules.  And as such I think your intrastate
    offering idea is a red herring, but I'll entertain you:Did you
    know that anything that is super obviously a security can be
    completely exempt if it matures or expires in less than 270
    days? Its written right there. Turns out there is a huge market
    called "commercial paper" that takes advantage of this
    specifically. I personally had no idea about it until I read
    the law itself.And there are lots of exemptions. Most of them
    are completely impractical for most of us.
 
      JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
      > Did you know that anything that is super obviously a
      security can be completely exempt if it matures or expires in
      less than 270 days?The United States is a common law country
      [1]. Implicitly stapled to the law are rulings and SEC rules.
      TL; DR There are more requirements to the commercial paper
      exemption than just the 270-day tenor.That said, you are
      generally correct?there are lots of exemptions to
      registration. For example, Regulation D provides a safe
      harbor within which almost all private-company stock is
      issued [2]. The trouble with ICOs, currently, is promoters
      seem to be overusing this "we're marketing a product, not a
      security" line. As a result, they're not taking advantage of
      these exemptions. Failing to qualify for an exemption is a
      difficult mistake to undo ex post facto. (The Filecoin ICO
      mentioned in the article does take advantage of one such
      exemption.)[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_law[2] ht
      tps://www.federalreserve.gov/bankinforeg/regdcg.htmDisclaimer
      : I am not a lawyer. This is not legal nor securities advice.
 
        ringaroundthetx - 2 hours ago
        > [1]
        https://www.federalreserve.gov/bankinforeg/regdcg.htm>
        Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal nor
        securities advice.Look, we know. Only armchair financial
        enthusiasts use those disclaimers, and you've made it
        painfully obvious and its a bit contrived.Federal Reserve
        regulation D is not the SEC's regulation D that you talked
        about.Regulation D is not an applicable exemption, neither
        is Filecoin's use of it, because the secondary markets
        where people are inevitably going to trade them have to be
        registered broker dealers to legally trade things that
        admit they are securities. Unlike private equity, there is
        nothing that functionally prevents people from trading
        cryptographic tokens, so it is better for now that the
        tokens themselves make sure they are NOT securities, not
        just 'exempt securities'. No matter what Filecoin did,
        there is still a major infrastructure problem that
        threatens to hamper all liquidity in this space, unless
        tokens are structured as products and distinct from the
        securities market.We've been here before. The SEC tried to
        regulate commodities. The SEC tried to regulate commodities
        futures and commodities options. The SEC thought they were
        covered under the wording of the Securities Act of 1933 but
        ultimately that just made no fucking sense for commerce. So
        the people of this country and the representatives thereof
        created the CFTC.And yet again, the SEC's frameworks makes
        no sense for this market, where assets can functionally be
        like a security, like a commodity, and like a currency
        simultaenously.A new framework isn't out of the question.
        For new services and sales that happen to use cryptographic
        tokens, being unambiguously a product isn't out of the
        question. Being unambiguously a security isn't out of the
        question.
 
          JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
          > Regulation D is not an applicable exemption, neither is
          Filecoin's use of it, because the secondary markets where
          people are inevitably going to trade them have to be
          registered broker dealers to legally trade things that
          admit they are securitiesFilecoin appears to be using
          Rule 506(c) of Regulation D, a ? 4(a)(2) exemption. Also,
          you don't need to be a broker-dealer to issue, buy or
          sell unregistered securities. (You do need to be one if
          you're doing those things with others' securities [1].)>
          The SEC tried to regulate commodities.Commodities-trading
          regulation predates the SEC by over a decade [2]. Every
          time securities law were written, commodities laws were
          rewritten [3][4] to explicitly carve commodities out from
          securities laws. Both agencies compete in the swaps
          market, due to their shared jurisdiction over securities-
          based swaps [5][6], but there are deeper reasons behind
          the CFTC's independence than it making "no fucking sense
          for commerce." (The short answer has to do with geography
          and the competing power centers of New York and
          Chicago.)> A new framework isn't out of the questionI
          agree. But it will probably take an act of Congress to do
          this. In the meantime, some promoters are violating the
          law.[1] https://www.sec.gov/reportspubs/investor-
          publications/divisi...[2]
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grain_Futures_Act[3]
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodity_Exchange_Act[4] h
          ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodity_Futures_Trading_Co
          mm...[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodity_Futures_
          Modernizatio...[6] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodd?Fra
          nk_Wall_Street_Reform_...Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer.
          This is not legal nor securities advice.
 
          ringaroundthetx - 36 minutes ago
          in your grandparent post, you are still linking the
          Federal Reserve's deposit insurance regulation, while
          talking about the Securities Exchange Commission's exempt
          securities offering regulation.I still find that
          entertaining, let me help you https://www.sec.gov/fast-
          answers/answers-regdhtm.htmlClassic strawman, I wasn't
          claiming Regulation D required anyone to be a broker
          dealer to issue buy or sell an exempt unregistered
          security. The claim is that reselling it freely requires
          you to go through or be a broker dealer, unless all
          buyers are accredited investors.
 
          JumpCrisscross - 23 minutes ago
          We've come full circle to the article's point. Barring an
          act of the Congress, most ICOs are conducting themselves
          in a way that is, under current law, illegal.
 
[deleted]
 
alistproducer2 - 3 hours ago
I was involved with one of the bigger ICO right at the beginning of
the ICO craze. I had pretty regular conversations with the project
founder and was in talks to become the dev evangelist. The project
had raised ~$5 million in ETH (this is when ETH was trading around
$80). Despite the fact that this project had raised a crazy amount
of money the whole project was being conceptualized and coded by a
single 23 old guy who was promising features that much larger
projects with teams of the best people in the field were yet to
solve. Not to mention the project was blatantly lying about it's
PoW algorithm.When I tried to point out that the project should use
some of that money to organize the software engineering aspect the
founder got pissed off with me accusing me of trying to run the
project. They had a second round and raised even more money (in
addition to the insane capgains on their first round).I check the
github from time to time and it appears they've got at least 2
other devs involved and may actually bring a blockchain to market
but this doesn't hide that fact that the project needed nowhere
near the amount of money they raised. Hell they could've used a
couple hundred grand from the first round and literally just paid a
team of people to build the blockchain for them. did I get off of a
gravy train? Yes. But there are more things to life than money.
 
  phkahler - 3 hours ago
  If you're launching one of these, you don't really need
  investment. You just make sure you own the first batch of
  currency and get rich if it takes off. If you need investment
  then you don't really believe in your own stuff do you?Ponzi
  Ponzi Ponzi.
 
    duxup - 2 hours ago
    That guy on TV keeps telling me how awesome owning gold is...
    it is so awesome he wants to sell me his...
 
      lightedman - 2 hours ago
      If they're selling pure gold at less than or equal to $800/oz
      then it's well worth it at this very moment with gold trading
      around $1200/oz right now. 50% profit ain't shabby.
 
      flimflamfloozle - 1 hours ago
      That guy on TV is a broker. He doesn't want to hold any gold.
      He wants to sell and buy at the same time and make money off
      of the spread.
 
        dmix - 1 hours ago
        Not sure if the answer is obvious here but I don't know
        much about finance, does 'spread' here mean the difference
        in the asset price from purchase/sale time (whether by
        market change or artificial markup) or the brokering fees
        involved? or both?
 
          hellbanner - 39 minutes ago
          #2:Any vendor will buy a good at say, $9 and sell at $10.
          In the US there are many pawn shops saying "We buy and
          sell gold!" - it's never at the same price.#1: A smart
          gold trader will buy low, sell high.. they will buy more
          gold when prices are low and advertise to sell more when
          the price is high.
 
    ojr - 1 hours ago
    its all speculation, speculation, speculation, just like the US
    stock market just less regulated, speculators get a bad rep but
    do more good than harm in an economy
 
    [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
  JSONwebtoken - 58 minutes ago
  I don't know the degree of complexity or technical ambition of
  the project you were a part of, but it's not unusual for a 23
  year old guy to write most of the Ethereum app. In fact, that's
  probably the reason why most ICOs are a scam, there's an insanely
  low barrier to building a proof of concept. The boilerplate is
  like 15 lines.When it's so easy that any 20 year old backend dev
  can issue a token, you should already know that no ETH-based app
  should be worth more than the same business model applied to a
  fiat currency.
 
    alistproducer2 - 31 minutes ago
    >23 year old guy to write most of the Ethereum appThe project
    is a from-scratch smart contract blockchain: including a new
    contract language
 
  [deleted]
 
  richardknop - 3 hours ago
  And what you described is one of the more "legitimate" ICOs. Many
  of them are outright scams. This one at least tries to do some
  token work while pocketing the massive amount of raised money.
 
    [deleted]
 
gaetanrickter - 5 hours ago
Add to this "Beyond Bitcoin: Overstock Lets Customers Pay With More
Than 40 Alt Coins" http://fortune.com/2017/08/08/overstock-digital-
currency/
 
  jgalt212 - 4 hours ago
  huh?> Out of the leading 500 internet sellers, just three accept
  bitcoin, down from five last year.http://www.businessinsider.com
  /merchants-arent-accepting-bit...
 
vanattab - 5 hours ago
I am thinking a short position in bitcoin is in my near future. I
am not saying bitcoin is doomed to fail but I am pretty confident
this shit coin crazy is going to hit the fan sooner or later and
it's going to drag the "legitimate" crypto currencies down.
 
  eternalvision - 4 hours ago
  Managing risk is all that matters.  Have a plan to manage the
  trade if you're wrong.
 
  fourstar - 5 hours ago
  How would you even go about doing that?
 
    jraines - 5 hours ago
    You can short btc on several platforms, including Bitfinex
 
      JumpCrisscross - 5 hours ago
      > You can short btc on several platforms, including
      BitfinexThere is a horrible counterparty correlation in this
      trade. If Bitcoin goes up, you're out your short and lose
      lots of money. If Bitcoin crashes, the exchange runs into
      problems and you probably lose your original investment.
      Balanced against those is the limited profit potential from a
      marginal drop in the price of Bitcoin.
 
        problems - 4 hours ago
        Why would the exchange run into problems in such a case?
        Some are certainly more reputable than others, but for the
        most part there's no reason to worry there.
 
          JumpCrisscross - 4 hours ago
          > there's no reason to worry thereThere are failure modes
          that have plagued exchanges for centuries. Namely, when
          things go down (a) lots of activity happens in a short
          period of time, often leading to administration and
          technical failures, and (b) lots of people lose money
          which presages them (i) refusing to pony up and (ii)
          suing.
 
          zwily - 4 hours ago
          Typically during BTC crashes even the best exchanges
          struggle to keep up with the load of people selling.
 
          joosters - 2 hours ago
          As well as the reasons mentioned by others, Bitfinex in
          particular is an exchange that is in deep financial
          difficulties. It has no working banking partners for
          anyone to withdraw USD, and their pseudo-$ currency
          'Tether-USD' is rumoured to be massively over-issued to
          cover their account shortfalls.
 
          grey-area - 4 hours ago
          Questions around the solvency of bitfinex have been
          circulating for years. Do they even allow USD withdrawals
          at present? Their actions are weirdly reminiscent of the
          long fall of mt gox.
 
    solotronics - 3 hours ago
    also, you can short the GBTC security on your brokerage account
 
  walrus1066 - 4 hours ago
  Beware that:?The market can stay irrational longer than you can
  stay solvent.? (John Maynard Keynes)Especially relevant to short
  selling
 
    ovulator - 42 minutes ago
    Shorting has got to be the dumbest way to invest. With a normal
    investment there is a ceiling to how much you can lose (the
    amount you invested) but there is no ceiling to how much you
    can gain.The complete opposite is true for shorting, not a bet
    I would make on any certainty level.
 
      alistproducer2 - 24 minutes ago
      This is my exact thought as well. The risk-reward of shorting
      makes the most sense when volatility is low. It is certainly
      the worst thing to do in an irrational bull market AKA
      bubble.
 
    acjohnson55 - 4 hours ago
    100%.I agree that BTC has been in a bubble, but if I had ever
    acted on this hunch, I'd be so far underwater right now.
    There's no telling how long the rally might continue, nor where
    the correction will settle.The other commenter made the astute
    observation that the less leveraged way to make this bet would
    be to go long on some competing asset.
 
      rothbardrand - 4 hours ago
      One of my personal indicators that Bitcoin is in a bubble is
      when Bitcoin articles on hacker news are overrun with people
      talking about their bitcoin related businesses, instead of
      being overrun with skeptics and people saying it's in a
      "bubble".We have gone from %90 negative a couple years ago on
      HN to about %50 negative today.
 
        arglebarnacle - 3 hours ago
        To be fair, if bitcoin had improving institutional support,
        adoption, technology, etc., you would observe the same
        trend in HN discussion about it. That would seem to make it
        a problematic indicator of a bubble, at least on its own.Of
        course, if one rules out the possibility that
        cryptocurrency is going to be a thing, then it's in a
        bubble by definition any time it's worth more than zero.
        This appears to be the underlying view of at least some
        commenters here.
 
  empath75 - 2 hours ago
  I'm starting to think that bitcoin is going to grow until it puts
  the world economy at risk.
 
  rm_-rf_slash - 5 hours ago
  "The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay
  solvent." YMMV.
 
    richardknop - 5 hours ago
    I agree. I would also short crypto but it's too dangerous now
    as the tulip mania could still grow more before it pops. Once
    the bubble clearly pops then I'd start actively shorting as
    there will be months of bear market probably after the
    reversal.
 
      gruez - 4 hours ago
      >Once tre bubble clearly pops then I'd start actively
      shorting as there will be months of bear market probably
      after the reversal.I seriously doubt that logic would work,
      because it's very possible that by the time you think the
      bubble clearly "popped", it has already reached the bottom.
      Not to mention that half the market is planning the same
      thing.
 
  jraines - 5 hours ago
  The ICOs are like 80-90% ETH based though.Good luck on the short
  . . . many hedge fund gods were "right" on the tech bubble but
  lost their shirts trying to short it before the exuberance
  subsided
 
    sharemywin - 5 hours ago
    I got burnt by the trump bump in the stock market.
 
  AznHisoka - 4 hours ago
  And I'm investing in Bitcoin. Just because it is at its peak
  doesn't mean it can't go even higher!I might be crazy, but your
  perspective isn't any more rational than mine :)
 
    s73ver - 4 hours ago
    Isn't that the problem, though? Bitcoin was supposed to be a
    medium of exchange. Cash for the internet, in other words.
    Investing means that people really aren't going to be doing
    that, and it's just going to sit on a dusty flash drive on the
    shelf.
 
      rothbardrand - 4 hours ago
      Not in the least.  Bitcoin has many uses, and is a
      fundamentally new technology.  Naturally it's going thru the
      technology adoption life cycle and every few months/years it
      catches up to the wider levels of adoption and more mature
      use cases.It will become a currency when most of it has been
      mined and it's in widespread use and there aren't billions of
      people who have never heard of it... the price will stabilize
      then.It's an error to think that the only use of bitcoin is
      as a currency. (in the traditional sense)
 
      VarFarYonder - 3 hours ago
      > Bitcoin was supposed to be a medium of exchange.Who decides
      what it is supposed to be? If serves as a place to store
      value, then it can do that regardless of what people think it
      is supposed to be.Maybe bitcoin will never be used for
      smaller, more common transactions, and it will remain solely
      a store of value. But I think it is simply a matter of time
      before a solution is found to the technical problem of
      creating a cryptocurrency (or maybe cryptocurrencies) that
      can serve the purpose of handling many smaller transactions.
 
      wyager - 2 hours ago
      Those aren't in any way mutually exclusive. There's always
      enough of a bitcoin supply (and it's divisible enough) to
      have sufficient liquidity for use as a medium of exchange.
      With the in-progress work on bidirectional micropayment
      channels, it's only going to become an even more useful
      medium of exchange.
 
      wmf - 4 hours ago
      At this point there's no way to prevent Bitcoin speculation
      so people might as well give up on using it as a medium of
      exchange.
 
  onewaystreet - 4 hours ago
  Just in the past three months bitcoin has gone from $1500 to
  $3000 to $2500 to $1800 to $2900 to $2500 to $3400. You'd make
  more with a lot less risk just waiting for a dip and buying.
 
    dsacco - 4 hours ago
    That volatility is perfect for a mean reversion strategy.
 
      adjkant - 3 hours ago
      I've been testing this out over the past 6 days with $500 to
      see how it would actually work while keeping my current
      amount in. I've been working a bit more on the micro level,
      but it still is pretty consistent in its volatility (lol).So
      far I have a 4.6% total return on trying to capitalize on the
      volatility. That's much less than if I had just held at the
      original buy. I'm going to keep doing it though to see how it
      works in long term flat and drop periods. When you hold
      yourself to rules, it also decreases maximum losses too. I
      see the strategy as a great way to make safe money relative
      to crypto.Right now if the volatility and my returns hold for
      even just two years, it could be going from $500 to over
      100K. It makes it really tempting not to increase the amount
      I'm playing with even slightly, but I have yet to see how the
      strategy fares on long term drops. I do have confidence it
      will perform well on long term flat periods though.
 
        dsacco - 2 hours ago
        A few notes on your comment here...keep in mind none of
        this is intended to be patronizing, in case my tone comes
        across that way. I just like talking about this.> So far I
        have a 4.6% total return on trying to capitalize on the
        volatility. That's much less than if I had just held at the
        original buy.If you compare the returns between those two
        strategies (buy and hold vs mean reversion), make sure you
        include comparisons of their beta profiles. Their risk
        measures are going to be very different.> When you hold
        yourself to rules, it also decreases maximum losses
        too.Speaking of rules, do you have a maximum tolerable
        drawdown for the strategy, or a number of consecutive
        losses at which you stop loss or retire the strategy? In
        order to add more rigor to your work (and so you know there
        is an element of empirical strategy here instead of just
        luck), you should conceive a set of priors for the strategy
        that allow you to set a hypothetical win rate. If you
        deviate too far from the win rate, or too far from a
        drawdown as mandated by your risk management rules, you
        should shut down the algorithm pending a review of its
        inputs and retire it if it's no longer working.> Right now
        if the volatility and my returns hold for even just two
        years, it could be going from $500 to over 100K.There are a
        few hypotheses implicit to your thought here:1. Market
        volatility for the target cryptocurrency will remain
        functionally stable for the next two years,2. Your strategy
        will remain functionally stable for the next two years,3.
        There is sufficient liquidity to allow you to continually
        compound your trading strategy's assets with its returns
        for the next two years, from an initial outlay of $500 to
        over $100,000, without hitting capital constraints along
        the way.Those are all testable hypotheses (which,
        technically, you're involved in doing), and I can't tell
        you if they're realistic. I wouldn't count on all three of
        them being correct though.
 
          adjkant - 2 hours ago
          Appreciate the post/points! I'm not an expert in this at
          all myself. Frankly, all of this is picked up from less
          than 3 years of various small tests in various investment
          strategies. I welcome all advice/thoughts on this. As
          said, this is an experiment truly.Could you elaborate on
          the beta profiles part? I can't say I'm very
          knowledgeable there. Assume I know very little about
          formal risk measurements.As far as the rules I
          referenced, I have a max single loss but have yet to set
          a stop loss/retirement point. This strategy evolved
          pretty loosely based on the idea of capitalizing on the
          volatility and part of the reason it's an experiment is
          that I'm okay with losing the $500 if it comes down to
          it. It's still incredibly risky, which I am aware of.
          Part of the reason I'm hesitant to put in a retirement
          point is that I can see losing a significant chunk in
          certain scenarios (this algorithm is not yet automated,
          though it very well may be soon, which would mitigate
          this) that would still be less than the long term gains.
          For example, given the returns, the strategy could still
          perform well taking occasional hits of say 20% in one day
          infrequently (read a few times a year). If/when this
          algorithm is automated, I will certainly be building in
          stop loss constraints.Fully agreed on the hypothesis and
          not counting on them at all, but I think they aren't
          incredibly unrealistic. I carefully chose two years in
          the post above because I don't see the volatility lasting
          much longer than that. Right now the strategy is
          incredibly liquid, and I don't see that part of it
          changing given the micro focus. No hold so far has lasted
          longer than 24h, and when this is more formalized, I see
          a hold time limit (as a function of loss/gain) being used
          to keep the lost opportunity cost down. I think the
          tuning will likely occur mainly over the next month or
          two, and after that I'll likely either stop or let it
          run.Overall, I would still categorize this much more as a
          personal test than a scientific one. We'll see how formal
          it gets.
 
  gremlinsinc - 1 hours ago
  Bitcoin is deflationary...meaniing there's a set limit that can
  be minted... once that limit is reached...all coins traded will
  be ones that are already in circulation--meaning there will be
  presumably higher demand, because of this, some are expecting BTC
  to go > 25k at some point in the future.
 
  ojr - 4 hours ago
  The money from bitcoin is coming from the liquidation of the
  current economy (stocks, bonds, dollars), go long on the US
  dollar rather than short bitcoin, your sentiment analysis for
  cryptocurrency does not match the market
 
  austenallred - 5 hours ago
  Even if you had a high degree of confidence that would happen
  eventually (which I'm not convinced you do), such a play would be
  absurdly risky, especially given no idea as to the timing.
 
    jimmykennedy - 4 hours ago
    It's also weird to assume that it'll "drag the "legitimate"
    crypto currencies down". It's much more likely that the legit
    ones will be a "safety" asset and only gain in credibility with
    large investors.
 
      CamelCaseName - 4 hours ago
      Historically that has not been the case, when BTC falls,
      everything else does as well.
 
        33W - 4 hours ago
        I see BTC as the crypto reserve currency, so it would make
        sense for the others to fall with it.
 
      phkahler - 3 hours ago
      It's funny to me that you view any of the crypto currencies
      as legitimate.
 
        cgmg - 59 minutes ago
        Why is that funny to you? What do you mean by "legitimate"?
 
        snappyTertle - 3 hours ago
        It's funny to me that you trust fiat money that can be
        devalued at the whim of governments and central banks.
 
  TACIXAT - 3 hours ago
  Heads up. Bitcoin is likely to be forever deflationary until it
  fails. There are no capital controls to increase the supply which
  means as people lose their wallets it becomes more and more
  constrained. I agree that it's a trash fire that will never be
  adopted as a regular currency, but its value could go up for a
  very long time like any collectible.
 
    joosters - 2 hours ago
    The number of bitcoins recently doubled as it forked. The
    'scarcity' of digital currency is a myth.
 
      corysama - 1 hours ago
      There have been hundreds of forks that went nowhere because
      no one cared about them.  Litecoin did well.  Dogecoin was so
      absurd it surprisingly didn't die on the vine.   Bitcoin Cash
      was a high-visibility fork that was expected to fizzle out.
      It still is, but it's being propped up by some number of
      factors.The point is that cryptos' values are based on
      widespread long term confidence.  That is something that can
      be replicated.  But, it's not as easy as hitting [fork this
      repo] on GitHub.  At least 900 fizzled forks have
      demonstrated that.
 
  solotronics - 3 hours ago
  the financial past is littered with the corpses of BTC
  shorts.Something to consider is that most of the ICO buyers would
  prefer to exit to BTC rather than exit to fiat currency. Possibly
  an ICO crash would make BTC go even higher.Actually, short BTC
  please.. I need more fuel for my long position :]
 
    foepys - 3 hours ago
    > the financial past is littered with the corpses of BTC
    shorts.It's also littered with the corpses of "very good
    investments" that will "make you rich quick".Without any
    securities standing behind Bitcoin but the promise that it will
    go higher, it comes down to gambling. Everybody hopes that
    another fool will come around and pay more than they did
    before. Bitcoin represents nothing but a currently 150GB large
    database of transactions. There are no machines (that are
    useful outside of Bitcoin), no IP, just a few million hashsums
    on a lot of computers.
 
      solotronics - 3 hours ago
      It takes some understanding of how the pieces fit together as
      a whole but Bitcoin is really the first distributed system of
      trust. Its a new idea but there it is the first digital thing
      that is unable to be forged and therefore it creates a system
      where you don't have to trust a counter party.It combines the
      following to achieve this [ hashing algorithms as proof of
      work, public key cryptography, solution for byzantine
      generals, game theory incentives to secure network and
      transactions ]The result is something that is both digital
      and scarce so it is a novel way to store value digitally.
 
  [deleted]
 
  pjc50 - 4 hours ago
  My predictions are:- craziness is only going to increase: people
  have realised they can create money out of thin air with an ICO,
  or fork of an existing coin- authorities will take a while to
  catch up and make arrests- a lot of people will be taken for
  suckers- crypto prices will continue to rise, including both
  halves of the bitcoin fork- I'm not going anywhere near this
  madness
 
  snappyTertle - 3 hours ago
  Short BTC because there's a bubble in ICOs from tokens built on
  top of ETH?
 
nipponese - 4 hours ago
The problem is projects like these: http://bitqyck.me/ A classic
hard-sell 80s pump and dump scam reborn in the ETH era. Bitqyck
came to my attention through a family friend with very limited
understanding of cryptocurrency, but just enough financial literacy
to be in an investment group being fed these scams by people they
trust as technical leadership. I imagine, ultimately, these people
will demand protection from having to vet ICOs themselves, and
twenty years later there will be an awesome movie about this time
starring Leo DiCaprio.
 
  ajross - 3 hours ago
  The problem is the whole idea of cryptocurrency as a growth
  investment.  The symptom is a bunch of copycat scams trying to
  freeload on the broader market.  Without the bull market of the
  early '90's, Belfort would have had no one to sell to.  Same deal
  here.  The root cause is the insanity happening in bitcoin (and
  now Ethereal, I guess).Mark my words: this will all come crashing
  down.  I can't tell you when or why, but it's not sustainable.
  Probably it will happen in a way that makes the bitcoin nerds
  "right" in some sense of personal justice: the PRC will close the
  great firewall to bitcoin traffic, or backdoor the protocol in
  some unsupportable way.  Or the SEC will shut it down somehow.So
  sure: when the crash happens cryptocurrency "would have worked"
  if not for the meddling government.  But it will fail
  nonetheless, and all those people (again, most of whom are not
  investors in scams like bitqyck) are going to lose all their
  "money".
 
    cgmg - 1 hours ago
    When you say "this" will all come crashing down and "this" is
    not sustainable, what exactly are you referring to?
 
      dmix - 54 minutes ago
      Probably ICO's as a stable 'investment' vehicle in it's
      current form, as the market will eventually correct itself to
      match the real underlying value.That doesn't mean there isn't
      a ton of real value being generated here or that it doesn't
      have the potential to be at the scale it is now. It just
      might be too much, far too soon.Building companies and
      innovating is hard, flooding capital to it will boost the
      value generated but you can't simply manufacture it
      artificially by throwing money at it unless there is real
      talent and business models underneath.Just look at that
      Circle startup that raised a record seed round based on a
      nice sounding team and a half-baked idea. Too much money can
      actually hurt some companies chances.
 
        notahacker - 14 minutes ago
        > Too much money can actually hurt some companies
        chances.And you can't really emphasise this too much when
        the company is a couple of developers, a handful of lines
        of code and an idea expressed on a WordPress marketing
        site, and complete strangers are chucking coins that can be
        converted to tens of millions of dollars of hard currency
        in return for a token conferring no rights whatsoever,
        because blockchain > legal systems that actually enforce
        fiduciary duties. Investors are usually keen make sure
        founders can't just convert investments greater than "fuck
        you money" level into into yachts. But some ICO founders
        have already got a lot more, and even if they start with
        nothing but good intentions, they must wonder why they'd
        bother spending it building a company that in all
        probability won't be worth more.I'd buy the yacht too.
 
    ascendantlogic - 3 hours ago
    I take a different view of this. I remember the dot com bust.
    This is a lot like the old IPO mania. Out of those ashes the
    real companies with real products survived and the culling of
    the vaporware was healthy for the market.There are a lot of
    people in the blockchain space that believe deeply in the
    technology and are working to see it to fruition. There's
    plenty that see a quick buck and will leave their "investors"
    holding the bag. This cycle is not new and I don't think it
    means everything regarding blockchain is a scam. It's just very
    reminiscent of mid-to-late 90's Internet mania
 
    eterm - 3 hours ago
    The worst of is that early adopters will cash out boat loads of
    money and use that fact to claim they were right all along, as
    if somehow the top of the pyramid making money proves it's not
    a pyramid.
 
      Radim - 3 hours ago
        Mark my words: this will all come crashing down. I can't
      tell you when or why, but it's not sustainable.  The irony:
      lots of people feel the same way about the "real" debt-based
      modern economy. A ridiculous Ponzi scheme, clearly
      unsustainable in the long run.As always, the time horizon
      matters when talking about investments and sustainability.
      Given the right time window, everything works, and everything
      fails.
 
        [deleted]
 
    sgspace - 47 minutes ago
    You sound like the other thousands of posts I've read over the
    past 8 years. You're either correct or missing out on something
    massive.
 
the_stc - 3 hours ago
The SEC guidance galvanized us on not offering tokens. Instead, we
are going to offer shares directly in the company, even if they are
mostly issued via an ERC20 contract. If we are going to get heat
from the SEC, might as well go all out and issue proper shares.Plus
tokens don't even make sense most of the time. You can't buy a
Tesla car with TSLA and you do not get dividends/trading with a
car. And no one outside kids at Chuck E Cheese want to use venue-
specific currency.