GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-06) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Africa has entered the space race, with Ghana's first satellite now
orbiting earth
104 points by jessiemcr
https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/06/africa-enters-the-space-race/
___________________________________________________________________
 
xenophonf - 1 hours ago
It's not even the first African-designed and -built satellite,
which was NigeriaSat-X.  In fact, Nigeria has had a space program
for some time, starting in 2001, with satellite launch plans as
early as 1976:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Space_Research
_and_De...
 
  _djo_ - 1 hours ago
  Technically speaking, the first African-designed and built
  satellite, albeit one that never flew, was South Africa's
  Greensat, which began as a military reconnaissance project in
  1985 and was converted to an earth observation satellite in
  1993.[0]Beyond that, Stellenbosch University's SUNSAT (designed
  and built entirely by its students and professors under the
  SunSpace spinoff) went up in 1999, 18 years ago, and 12 years
  earlier than NigeriaSat-X.[1] I'm not saying this to score
  points, only to establish the proper context for why this piece
  is inaccurate, in that African countries have been sending up
  indigenous satellites for decades.Basically this is just
  incredibly lazy reporting. It could've been an interesting story
  about how Cubesats are enabling space access for scientists,
  students, and engineers in nations like Ghana which lack the
  resources of their richer global and even continental neighbours,
  but instead TechCrunch went for the easy way
  out.[0]http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/greensat.htm
  [1]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SUNSAT
 
    xenophonf - 59 minutes ago
    I didn't know about SUNSAT.  Thanks for the link!
 
vaadu - 3 hours ago
It's 2017. The space race has been over for decades.
 
  drdeadringer - 2 hours ago
  Too bad for Space X and company, I guess.
 
  noobermin - 1 hours ago
  I'm pretty sure they don't specifically mean the space race from
  the soviets and the US, it's just a generic term for achieving
  access to space.It would help if we were all a little less
  pedantic about things that don't really affect the bulk of the
  article.
 
  k__ - 2 hours ago
  No!We need it for capitalism!If we letting people own property,
  we need more of it so everyone can have some
 
    ue_ - 2 hours ago
    What do you mean?
 
      quuquuquu - 2 hours ago
      I believe the poster is saying that "if we are letting people
      own land/factories/capital on Earth, then the space race must
      continue.This will ensure that the technologies will be
      democratized, and people can go claim land elsewhere to begin
      building their destiny."This is perhaps a critique of
      potential lack of opportunity and growth here on Earth.
 
        k__ - 1 hours ago
        yes, thank you.
 
        ue_ - 2 hours ago
        Proudhon picked up on this point at the start of the 19th
        century; there isn't enough property (private property) for
        everyone, ignoring of course critical depletion of all the
        earth's resources such that even personal property becomes
        infeasible.The solution proposed is to abandon the idea of
        property, not merely make it common to all, but rather to
        abolish it as a right.
 
          quuquuquu - 1 hours ago
          I do agree, thank you for sharing!Humanity has made
          plenty of strides in democratizing technology that
          improve the length, quality, and self-sufficiency of many
          peoples lives (internet, medicine, clothing, water
          purificiation, food production etc)Many people have been
          "lifted out of poverty" by technology, yet this has led
          to renewed and different types of conflict.Many more
          remain in dire straits.I'm not sure that moving to Mars
          would solve 4 billion people's problems, but I guess it's
          an idea!
 
personjerry - 2 hours ago
When the US launches a satellite they don't write "North America"
enters the space race, so why does Ghana represent all Africa?
 
  BurningFrog - 2 hours ago
  Also the "space race" is an ancient term referring to the
  US/Soviet rivalry many decades ago.
 
  grecy - 11 minutes ago
  The way the western Media reports on this continent is downright
  negligent. It's misleading and honestly hinders the world's
  perception of the reality here.I'm in West Africa right now,
  moving South, and it boggles my mind to see how the world reports
  on "Africa".Every day people ask me questions online and I read
  articles about "Africa" - so many people genuinely think it is
  one "place" a can be all lumped together. Because of that people
  assume that for example if there is war in South Sudan, then
  "Africa" is very dangerous. Or drought in Northern Kenya means
  "Africa" is desperate for water. They have no understanding there
  are over a billion people living in 54 separate countries spread
  out by tens and tens of thousands of miles.If there was war or a
  nasty disease breakout in Northern Oregon would it be dangerous
  to visit Costa Rica? of course not.
 
gcatalfamo - 3 hours ago
It could be me and changing perspectives but I find myself opening
TC articles much less lately.Most of them feel like filler content
that, in case you were into the article topic, make you look for
the substantial information elsewhere.I also realized I am not
seeing TC headlines anymore in my feeds. It only happens on HN.
 
  overcast - 2 hours ago
  TechCrunch hasn't been relevant for years.
 
Froyoh - 3 hours ago
It's about time
 
wavefunction - 3 hours ago
I'm glad to see that Ghana is gaining experience with satellites.
I'm not going to read the article because of the headline but it
seems like Ghana could be a great place to be involved in space
launches eventually, as close to the equator as they are.While
people talk about the Chinese century or the rise of India, I think
even more interesting will be the continued development of Africa.
 
  usrusr - 1 hours ago
  > it seems like Ghana could be a great place to be involved in
  space launches eventually, as close to the equator as they
  are.Unfortunately Ghana lacks a downrange ocean. Launching to the
  east is just as helpful as launching close to the equator.
 
    greglindahl - 1 hours ago
    Ghana can launch south into polar orbits.
 
      sbierwagen - 50 minutes ago
      Proximity to the equator doesn't do anything for polar
      launches, any country with open ocean to the north or south
      can do a polar launch.
 
        dtparr - 8 minutes ago
        In fact it does do something for polar launches, but it's
        bad. Being close to the equator means cancelling out more
        rotational velocity to go into a polar orbit.
 
return0 - 3 hours ago
There is a race?
 
pacala - 2 hours ago
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_National_Space_A...> In
1999, South Africa launched its first satellite, SUNSAT from
Vandenberg Air Force Base in the USA. A second satellite,
SumbandilaSat, was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in
Kazakhstan in 2009.
 
  igravious - 58 minutes ago
  TechCrunch needs to amend/correct the headline, it doesn't even
  jibe with the article's contents.
 
  _djo_ - 1 hours ago
  Notably, both were indigenous designs created by the University
  of Stellenbosch and the CSIR.
 
rsync - 2 hours ago
Not really related, but I continue to find it fascinating that
South Africa had nuclear weapons:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sout
h_Africa_and_weapons_of_ma...
 
  pavlov - 2 hours ago
  Sweden also had a fairly advanced nuclear weapons program in the 
  1950s:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_nuclear_weapons_progr
  a...
 
  _djo_ - 1 hours ago
  It is somewhat related, in that as part of that programme South
  Africa built the RSA series of space launchers, doubling up as
  nuclear-armed ICBMs, with technical assistance from Israel.The
  'R5b' space programme would've used the RSA-3 and RSA-4
  launchers, with the former designed to place a 330 kg satellite
  in a 41 degree low earth orbit and the RSA-4 able to place a
  satellite into a medium earth orbit.As part of this, the Greensat
  earth observation satellite was designed and built, initially for
  military surveillance and later for civilian uses.[0]Four RSA-3s
  were built, three were launched on sub-orbital test trajectories
  from Overberg Test Range, and the fourth remains preserved at the
  South African Air Force Museum at Air Force Base Swartkop,
  complete with mock satellite in the final stage.[1][2]Had the
  programme not been cancelled in 1990, it's likely that South
  Africa would've been able to launch Greensat by 1992 or 1992.
  However, it was prohibitively costly and of questionable benefit
  for a country slashing budgets after the end of war, preparing to
  end apartheid, and acceding to international protocols on the use
  of ICBMs and nuclear weapons. Attempts were made at commercial
  sales, but the programme was never really cost effective.[0]http:
  //space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/greensat.htm[1]http://www.astronaut
  ix.com/r/rsa-3.html[2]http://www.astronautix.com/r/rsa-4.html
 
mcappleton - 3 hours ago
I kind of feel like entering the space race requires building a
rocket, not paying someone else to launch your satellite.
 
  [deleted]
 
    userbinator - 2 hours ago
    Also worthy of note from the article:While Ghana?s president
    Nana Akufo-Addo applauded the launch and congratulated the team
    directly, the project did not receive official Ghanaian
    government support, according to Damoah. Instead, Japan?s
    national space agency, JAXA, provided the bulk of the resources
    and training to develop the satellite.In other words, this is
    also mostly a Japanese-US effort too.
 
      noobermin - 1 hours ago
      Japanese-US funded effort, not quite the same thing.
 
    jerrylives - 2 hours ago
    Hacker News: where anonymous cowards belittle the scientific
    effort of nations while making racist overtures
 
      cderwin - 2 hours ago
      Likewise,Hacker News: where anonymous cowards call others
      anonymous cowards and make baseless accusations of
      racismApologies for the meta-discussion, but this sort of
      comment is unbecoming of hacker news.  Instead of calling
      anonymous commenters names, we should discuss their ideas.
 
        jerrylives - 2 hours ago
        >baseless accusationHe literally says this is "affirmative
        action" in regards to an African nation and calls the
        competency of a space program into question for no reason.
        That's not baseless, it's quite blatant really.I don't want
        to discuss the ideas of morons. There needs to be a bar set
        if you want to have reasonable, meaningful conversations.
        Not every opinion or thought is worthy of discourse and
        some are actively harmful. I see more and more racist and
        otherwise trollish comments on HN everyday and frankly I'm
        sick of it.
 
          castis - 2 hours ago
          That post was downvoted and flagged, no need to further
          indulge that sort of thing either way.
 
          cderwin - 2 hours ago
          The commenter is quite clear that he or she is calling
          into question the competency of the Ghanaian space
          program because "its not even a new design, they
          literally just used the cubesat platform and launched it
          from United States."Similarly, the connection between
          calling this article the space-race equivalent of
          "affirmative action" and the alleged racism of the author
          of the comment is unclear.If you actually believe the
          author of the comment is a racist, you should make your
          case.  The author's racism doesn't seem "blatant" to me,
          and presumably wouldn't to most of the hn community.
 
  JPLeRouzic - 3 hours ago
  Like they did 55 years ago? NASA nowadays uses someone else's
  rockets to launch its own satellites, and it makes sense
  economically and strategically.Rockets cannot be a smart space
  system, we have to invent something else, more fluide, secure,
  economical and less catastrophic in its essence.
 
    JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
    > Rockets cannot be a smart space systemIt's chemical rockets,
    nukes or a space elevator. At least given known physics.
 
      JPLeRouzic - 2 hours ago
      In your answer you mix a space elevator with rockets, a space
      elevator is not a rocket. But people have invented many other
      designs that are not rockets, there is a huge page on
      Wikipedia about them:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-
      rocket_spacelaunch
 
        JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
        How do I mix them? I said the alternatives to rockets are
        nukes or a space elevator, both of which, for Earth to
        space launch, are beyond current feasibility. Ditto with
        most of the ideas on that Wikipedia page. Air breathing
        only gets you 10% of the way and the others are limited by
        our materials.
 
          JPLeRouzic - 1 hours ago
          Sir, English is not my native language but what I see on
          my screen is that you wrote:> It's chemical rockets,
          nukes or a space elevator. At least given known
          physics.So I have a hard time to understand how that
          would mean:  "the alternatives to rockets are nukes or a
          space elevator"In addition nukes are rockets (as far I
          know), so how could they be alternatives to rockets?And
          they are not beyond feasibility, NOVA has been studied at
          NASA extensively, I think it was even fired for testing
          but I can't find a
          reference:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_(rocket)And
          there are other proposals, rockets are really a dead end,
          I only need a few centuries to be proved right!
 
    olewhalehunter - 3 hours ago
    >we have to invent something else, more fluid, secure,
    economical and less catastrophic in its essence.like UFOs?
 
      JPLeRouzic - 2 hours ago
      Without going as far in the unknown there is this:https://en.
      wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetohydrodynamic_drive#Spac...
 
[deleted]