GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-04) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Airport lounges will let anyone in, provided you can fake a QR code
115 points by rbanffy
https://boingboing.net/2016/08/05/airport-lounges-will-let-anyon...
___________________________________________________________________
 
joeblau - 3 hours ago
I know United checks your ticket and flight info before they let
you in. That's been my experience in the U.S. at least.
 
  tcas - 1 hours ago
  Same with Delta. Whenever I check in they pull more information
  than what's on the ticket. I would be amazed if they don't do
  simple validation to see that the PNR/name/etc... match their
  systems.When I have a physical ticket, and change my seat on the
  app, they usually re-print my boarding pass with the new seat
  number on it.This might work for some non-airline run partner
  lounges without flight data access, but usually those have
  "coupons" given by the check in agent for access. The video shows
  someone entering a Star Alliance lounge, using self serve
  scanners. They probably aren't network connected like a normal
  check in agent stand
 
  toweringgoat - 3 hours ago
  It's worth noting that most airlines can view most tickets given
  the name and ticket number (you can use the saudia website to
  view the gory details of tickets issued by most TAs and airlines
  yourself if you wish). Whether or not they do is a separate
  question, but United certainly do check (partly since the
  itinerary can grant lounge access even if the flight you are
  taking next doesn't).
 
hbosch - 1 hours ago
Up until relatively recently, there was an iOS tweak (if you were
jailbroken) that would inject status signifiers into your
Delta/United/America/Airline app. Or something. Via the "Flex"
jailbreak app, you could tweak and change all sorts of flags in
your current apps ? e.g. "Infinite Skips" in Pandora, or "Remove
banner ads" in Candy Crush ? and one of the most widely abused one
was a tweak that would put, say, "Diamond Status" on your device's
boarding pass.I don't know if this got you into lounges, but users
reported it did at least get them into expedited security lines.
 
  raverbashing - 39 minutes ago
  They can still check by requiring either that your ticket
  corresponds to the "fast lane" or that you have the status card
  indicated
 
losteverything - 1 hours ago
It's been yearsQuestion: can a member bring in a guest?I assume yes
as my spouse accompanied me.So? Why not create a way (app) to have
members already in the lounge come and let in their "guest/SO"?"Im
available / not available for "guesting" flag
 
  callahad - 53 minutes ago
  In most cases, you can bring in a guest as long as they're also
  traveling on the same day, on the same alliance.The FlyerTalk
  forums have reasonably active threads to arrange this sort of
  thing on an ad-hoc basis.
 
  MBCook - 1 hours ago
  Uber for airport lounges! It's like a temporary AirBnB. First we
  can...I suddenly feel terrible about myself.
 
tyingq - 2 hours ago
From a security standpoint, I'm actually relieved that 3rd party
operated airport lounges don't have direct apis to match passengers
to flights.I'm sure there's some middle ground solution that
protects info, but I'd prefer this situation to the polar opposite
of unfettered API access.This seems to be a deliberate case of
light protection on purpose...not much is lost if you grant access.
I can sneak into a local gym easy enough as well by catching the
door before it shuts.
 
  curun1r - 1 hours ago
  This is a case where the airline should sign the information in
  the QR code. Lounges get the airlines' public keys and pick the
  one for the passenger's flight and, after verifying the
  signature, can trust the information in the QR code. No API
  access necessary.Don't over think, just use HMAC. It's disturbing
  how often that advice is needed.
 
    tyingq - 41 minutes ago
    Yes, that's a solution, but the boarding pass is used by
    different entities like the TSA.  So it's unsurprisingly a big
    political event to change what's encoded.It's similarly
    surprising how often devs think the problem is solely technical
    :)
 
arasmussen - 1 hours ago
Sounds like a good answer to "When have you most successfully
hacked some (non-computer) system to your advantage?"
 
linker3000 - 3 hours ago
Then there's the time United cancelled my early morning flight from
SFO to LHR and rerouted me home via an 8pm flight to Dulles and
refused to let me use the lounge when I suggested it would be a
nice gesture ('some people have paid an annual fee for the lounge
you know...') so I spent the whole day moving between restaurants
and seats in the departure lounge.That was the last time I flew
with them./Not bitter..//Hell, yes, I was sooo pissed.
 
  zippergz - 2 hours ago
  I pay $400/yr for United Club access specifically so that I can
  go there when there's a flight delay or cancelation. Like, that
  is specifically the reason I pay it. As a regular business
  traveler, it is worth it to have access to better and less busy
  agents, and a nicer place to sit, when something goes wrong.
  Letting in people for free when something goes wrong would
  eliminate the benefit in it (because the most important thing is
  the lack of lines/crowds).
 
  MichaelGG - 3 hours ago
  United lounges are unfortunately pretty full already with their
  awards programs plus their "tens of dollars" upgrades. If they
  let every person they rerouted or canceled in, it'd be even
  worse. Though it doesn't mitigate how crappy it must have been
  for you.
 
    saryant - 3 hours ago
    TOD upgrades don't get lounge access since domestic F doesn't
    get lounge access.
 
      MichaelGG - 3 hours ago
      There's plenty of light international travel that TOD applies
      to though. Not US-EU but CA/MX/Central America?
 
  toweringgoat - 3 hours ago
  There is no early morning flight from SFO to LHR. In fact there
  are no morning flights (on United) from SFO to LHR. It just
  doesn't make any sense in terms of timings.And random flight
  cancellations happen on any airline (and rebooking options can be
  limited depending on time of year). Its part of flying, deal with
  it.
 
    kps - 2 hours ago
      > There is no early morning flight from SFO to LHR.  It took
    about 20 seconds to have Google Flights show me a 6:40am
    departure from SFO to LHR via ORD.
 
    linker3000 - 2 hours ago
    Fair play - I have just checked this out and my memory wasn't
    too accurate - it was UA901, which leaves around 12:55 (when
    it's not cancelled!), and I was probably basing my comment on
    the fact that I was getting to the airport around 9.30am to
    allow for returning the rental and security etc., so I would
    have been on the road to the airport around 8am.
 
    komali2 - 3 hours ago
    >deal with itWhy is his solution (suggesting the behavior is
    poor) a better implementation of "dealing with it" than your
    implied implementation (doing nothing)?
 
      toweringgoat - 2 hours ago
      I'm just pointing out that disruptions are nothing unexpected
      if you travel often - you can't really expect extraordinary
      treatment. (Sure, in the EU at least you get food and lodging
      by law - but lounge access is a completely different
      beast.)After all do you expect to be put in first class just
      because a weather or security issue caused your flight to be
      cancelled? You aren't the only person affected, airlines
      can't handle everyone like a snowflake.
 
        icebraining - 2 hours ago
        Weather and security issue, maybe not, but otherwise,
        they're liable to pay 600? in indemnity for a 3h+ delay on
        such a long flight. I think that should cover a few hours
        of lounge access.
 
          toweringgoat - 1 hours ago
          No. They. Aren't. EU regulations only affect EU carriers,
          or flights departing the EU. (And also Switzerland,
          possibly Norway.) Not applicable here.And if they had to
          pay that compensation (as explained they don't in this
          case), they definitely won't want to add bonus lounge
          access.
 
          [deleted]
 
          icebraining - 41 minutes ago
           Right, I was talking about the EU rights, since you
          brought it up. Sorry for not being clear.
 
  driverdan - 1 hours ago
  I don't see the problem. If you want lounge access pay for it.
  Flights get cancelled and delayed, especially in SFO.
 
  koyote - 2 hours ago
  If you had flown BA and they cancelled your flight you'd have
  been in for a nice amount of cash in compensation due to EU law.
 
    throwaway049 - 1 hours ago
    Entitled anyway. That delay compensation applies to all flights
    starting or ending in the EU.
 
      atomwaffel - 1 hours ago
      Almost, but not quite. It does apply on all flights departing
      from the EU, but only on flights arriving in the EU if they
      are operated by a carrier from an EU country. It's a small
      but important distinction.For example, if you were travelling
      from London to New York, it would always apply regardless of
      the airline. In the other direction, however, it would apply
      on BA but not on AA.
 
syntheticnature - 4 hours ago
Needs a (2016) on it; the article is almost a year old.Also, per
the comments, seems very YMMV.
 
Spivak - 3 hours ago
What's the takeaway here? That they use a rudimentary security
system as a mild deterrent which is easily exploitable. That it's
okay to commit fraud as long as you use tech to do it?You wouldn't
see this kind of thing on a lockpicking forum, "Airport lounges
will let anyone in, provided you brink your kit."
 
  iainmerrick - 3 hours ago
  Exactly! Just because the flaw is there, that doesn't give you
  the right to gratuitously exploit it. Do we really want to force
  people to implement super-strict security for relatively trivial
  things like this?
 
    eunoia - 3 hours ago
    Oh the poor airlines!  They would never, ever gratuitously
    exploit their passengers.  How could these mean awful people
    take advantage of them like this?It's pretty hard to root for a
    corporation when it's smart individual vs faceless
    multinational ineptitude.  Human nature perhaps?
 
      mseebach - 2 hours ago
      By that logic, shoplifting from sufficiently large stores is
      ok. Not stealing bread to feed your family, just randomly
      grabbing stuff because you feel like it (and it isn't locked
      down).
 
        eunoia - 2 hours ago
        Stealing physical items for fun != exploiting ineptitude to
        have a less terrible layover.  It's also harder to even
        begin to measure the economic cost.I think it's more akin
        to buying terrible cheap seats to a show and moving into a
        better yet unoccupied section once it starts.The internet
        has always seemed to have a lot more moralists than the
        real world.
 
          [deleted]
 
          mwfunk - 1 hours ago
          Actually no, the internet is just where many people
          realize that the things they think are OK sometimes
          aren't, because on the internet they're telling the whole
          world what sketchy stuff they do, instead of just their
          buddies that they do sketchy stuff with. You're much more
          likely to interact with people you wouldn't normally
          cross paths with on the internet, and the audience is
          much wider.Tangentially, I really hate buying good seats
          and getting to a show to find some cheapo sitting in them
          because they're proactively hoping no one shows up. If
          you want good seats, buy good seats. Lots of people in
          the real world feel that way, and respecting other
          people's wishes (even, and especially, when you think
          it's unreasonable and can't relate) is a basic part of
          being a grownup.
 
          eunoia - 54 minutes ago
          Your first point is spot on and interesting.  I would
          also argue that we all have different flaws and it's easy
          to judge others for theirs while pretending ours are
          somehow less bad.  For example the most judgemental
          people I know are also some of the "worst" people I know.
          Their morality matrix is just incredibly biased towards
          looking favorably upon themselves vs others.As for the
          tangent, if you can't be bothered to show up for a show
          by the time it starts you can at least be bothered to say
          "Hey, these are my seats."  I've been on both sides of
          that interaction many times.  Every time it's been
          resolved immediately and amicably.That might be too much
          human interaction though.  Maybe we should get further
          away from humans talking to each other and invent another
          app to solve this "problem".
 
          mikeash - 2 hours ago
          Maybe, as long as you don't touch any of the food or
          drink. How likely is that, though?
 
          eunoia - 2 hours ago
          Did you know most airlines have absolutely awful
          inventory control over the supplies on their planes?  If
          you make friends with a flight attendant they usually
          have the leeway to bring you just about anything you want
          for free.  Is that stealing too?Pro tip:  Bring candy or
          snacks for flight attendants on long flights, they
          appreciate it and may even reciprocate in kind.
 
          mikeash - 1 hours ago
          It's not stealing when they give it to you willingly
          without any fraud.Are you that fuzzy on the concept of
          "stealing" that you don't see the difference here?
 
          eunoia - 49 minutes ago
          Actually it is stealing, you're just not the one doing
          it.
 
          mikeash - 27 minutes ago
          I bet the airlines allow flight attendants to use their
          discretion here.Forging a ticket is just not equivalent
          to asking nicely if you can have something.
 
          somabc - 19 minutes ago
          Airlines have fired staff for eating a sandwich or
          drinking a coke taken from the plane e en if it was going
          to be thrown away. It's the same concept as most food
          outlets. They have no discretion yo give away free things
          to people who give them candy.
 
          BeetleB - 2 hours ago
          >I think it's more akin to buying terrible cheap seats to
          a show and moving into a better yet unoccupied section
          once it starts.And GP thinks otherwise.You are merely
          stating an opinion.
 
        watty - 2 hours ago
        Apparently it's ok to create fake barcodes.
 
      arnarbi - 2 hours ago
      Opposing stealing is now rooting for corporations?
 
        CodeMage - 2 hours ago
        I really wish people would stop slapping the "theft" label
        on things that aren't. It's intellectual laziness that just
        cheapens the discussion.Sitting in an airport lounge you
        shouldn't have access to isn't stealing. Piracy isn't
        stealing. Using ad blockers on a site that supports itself
        through ads isn't stealing.
 
          pharrington - 53 minutes ago
          Physical space in a building is a limited resource. "IP"
          isn't.
 
          SilasX - 1 hours ago
          They call it "theft" for the defensible reason that it
          maps to traditional theft in (what they regard as) the
          most important dimensions.  Your disagreement with the
          validity of the (IMHO, obvious) mapping doesn't make it
          lazy.Theft is wrong for well-known reasons.  Most of
          those same reasons apply to these situations.
 
          BeetleB - 2 hours ago
          You may have a point.So opposing trespass is now rooting
          for corporations?
 
          CodeMage - 2 hours ago
          Well, @eunoia seems to think so. I happen to disagree.
          But at least now we can discuss it without the emotional
          baggage of calling someone a thief. For whatever reason,
          people get worked up over that label more than
          "trespasser" or "squatter" or "moocher" ;)
 
          zo1 - 44 minutes ago
          I'm afraid we all might be wrong/right on some level.
          I.e.:1. Getting into an area you don't have access to:
          Trespassing.2. Tricking the security they have in place:
          Fraud.3. Taking snacks from the lounge-area: Stealing.
 
          KGIII - 1 hours ago
          It may be classed as theft of services.If curious,
          consult a qualified legal representative in the
          appropriate jurisdiction.
 
          usertrjx - 2 hours ago
          What about the food and drink that are offered in these
          lounges?
 
          eh78ssxv2f - 31 minutes ago
          > Sitting in an airport lounge you shouldn't have access
          to isn't stealing.What do you think of random people
          occupying your house while you are gone out to work or
          grocery store? Is that okay too?> Using ad blockers on a
          site that supports itself through ads isn't stealing.I
          agree with this because browsers are "user agents" not
          "website agents".
 
        eunoia - 2 hours ago
        Many/most forms of hacking could be construed as stealing
        if you squint hard enough.  What was this community founded
        around again?Do you think "disruption" is a peaceful,
        happy, 100% beneficial process for everyone involved?  Is
        Uber stealing by taking business from incumbents that play
        by a different (regulated) rulebook?
 
          kinkrtyavimoodh - 2 hours ago
          This 'community' (to the extent that all the users of
          this site can be clubbed into one) was definitely not
          formed on any founding principle which would legitimize
          theft.Not that sneaking into airport lounges is some huge
          theft, but acting like it's completely okay isn't cool
          either.
 
          eunoia - 2 hours ago
          I agree, it's not 100% okay.  I wouldn't feel bad doing
          it though.  I also wouldn't do it in a situation where my
          presence hurts another paying customer (i.e. full
          lounge).My personal ethics apply to how my actions impact
          other living things. I don't lose sleep worrying if I've
          wronged an entity created solely for the purpose of
          maximizing shareholder value.I'm honestly surprised how
          many people don't agree with that.  To each their own I
          suppose.Edit:  You're totally right about the futility of
          trying to shove all of us into any one descriptive bucket
          though.  That was a mistake.
 
      bdcravens - 2 hours ago
      I don't think it's rooting for a corporation, but a simple
      matter of ethics.
 
        finnn - 2 hours ago
        They have no ethics while exploiting you for as much money
        as possible, so you should be nice to them and treat them
        as you would another human?Edit: sorry, this was kind of a
        flippant remark that I made without thinking a lot.
 
          ImSkeptical - 1 hours ago
          Don't they transport you and your luggage safely through
          the air at high speed for a sum of money that you agreed
          to pay?  Where is exploitation coming from?
 
          zo1 - 35 minutes ago
          Capitalism, apparently.Though, to be a bit more generous,
          I'd interpret that people hate airlines without really
          having a conscious reason, so they make something up
          that's visible and easy to be upset about. E.g. Cost of
          flying, leg-room, crappy service, "run by evil
          corporation". I'd posit that they somehow see something
          wrong with it, yet can't pin-point what that is. In my
          view, somehow they realize that a government-enabled and
          enforced monopoly makes the whole thing unfair. And if
          only we had no intervention and prevention of
          competition, they'd finally see "nice" airlines. But
          until they actively "see" that, they'll always think that
          it's the government that's preventing the really nice
          peachy happy people from running an airline that they'd
          enjoy using.
 
          bdcravens - 1 hours ago
          Yes, I should be honest.
 
          opportune - 2 hours ago
          That's a vast exaggeration of things. "Exploiting" my
          ass. You know the reason why airlines are so shitty?
          Because people only buy the cheapest tickets to their
          destination. I'm guilty of this myself. The end result is
          a race to the bottom .And yes, when the man refused to
          get off the United plane, he should not have been beaten.
          Big deal, hundreds of millions of people fly every year.
          The fact that that happened sucks, but the reality is
          that 99.99% of people will at worst just deal with
          incompetent customer service during a cancelled or
          heavily delayed flight. That doesn't give you
          justification to steal from the airliner.This is a
          discussion I feel you would have with a teenager.
 
    whipoodle - 2 hours ago
    I mean, I see your point, but if that's what they have to do to
    stop fraud, and the fraud is something they really care about,
    then yeah, they should do that. Surely it's no great tragedy
    that stores have cash registers and bill checkers.
 
      mikeash - 2 hours ago
      Most stores have far fewer controls than they could, because
      they'd rather be nice to their customers. This changes if the
      level of fraud/theft increases.Stores places where few people
      steal are nice and open, have nobody watching the doors, and
      basically rely on the honor system to ensure that you pass by
      a cashier before you leave. Stores in places where theft is
      common have all sorts of unpleasant security measures.Society
      only works because most of us behave. Look around you, and
      you'll see an incredible number of structures that only work
      because 99% of people are basically decent and honest. Don't
      be in the 1% who aren't, and definitely don't encourage that
      1% to grow.
 
        techsupporter - 1 hours ago
        > Most stores have far fewer controls than they could,
        because they'd rather be nice to their customers. This
        changes if the level of fraud/theft increases.Yep, and
        people can easily see this for themselves.  It is
        incredibly telling to note the difference between going
        into the Rite Aid on Rainier Ave S in Seattle and the Rite
        Aid on 35th Ave NE in the same city.  They're almost
        directly due north/south of each other and separated by
        less than ten miles.However, the Rainier one has at least
        one visible store security guard, tags on the shopping
        trolleys to prevent leaving the store with them, locked-
        down shaving razor refills and baby formula and small
        electronics, and "you are being recorded" security
        televisions prominently placed.The one on 35th has none of
        those.  If there is a security guard or loss-prevention
        specialist, that person is often hidden.  Shave refills are
        easily accessed (though do have removable security tags),
        there are corrals outside so customers can use the trolleys
        to load purchases into their vehicles, and the store simply
        feels more open and accessible.
 
  another-dave - 1 hours ago
  "Hotel breakfast buffets will let anyone in, provided you can say
  a room number."
 
  catshirt - 2 hours ago
  the takeaway is that you can do it, as the title suggests :)
 
  mikeash - 2 hours ago
  Reminds me of the common joke life pro-tip: you can get stuff
  without paying for it by going to a store, picking something up,
  and just walking out with it!
 
  mnutt - 15 minutes ago
  I think the HN-framed takeaway here is that the developer
  building the system could have used a timestamp + HMAC and
  prevented the issue, but chose not to for whatever reason. Maybe
  they wanted to be able to generate barcodes from the app itself
  while offline, maybe they were getting the data from the server
  anyway and just didn't know any better.
 
habosa - 36 minutes ago
"Life hacks" like this are part of the larger category "crimes that
Americans like to brag about".There's some strange cultural thing
where people are proud of telling others how much they can get away
with.  You hear this all the time when talking about taxes, "yeah I
figure out how to put all my personal travel down as a business
expense".  It's especially egregious with warranty/insurance fraud,
such as when people drop their phone in water and then pretend it's
a manufacturer's defect.None of this really bothers me, but we
wonder why companies look to nickel and dime us all the time.  It's
because we can't be trusted!  Give the american consumer an inch,
and he takes a mile.  We have an adversarial relationship with
almost everyone we buy from / sell to, which I think is a big
source of pain and inefficiency.
 
  gumby - 5 minutes ago
  > There's some strange cultural thing where people are proud of
  telling others how much they can get away with.I am not a fan of
  many aspects of American culture, but I certainly disagree with
  your assertion.In fact I would go farther and say that in my
  experience Americans are less likely to do this than the majority
  of other countries.  It's why you can buy a trainer full of grain
  sight unseen or sell something on eBay.  Kind of amazing,
  actually.We focus more intensely, as we should, on the bad news
  or violations.  But overall Americans don't have a zero-sum
  mentality and stick to their word, which is why the society and
  economy have done as well as they have.
 
  [deleted]
 
  berberous - 29 minutes ago
  I think you have the cause/effect reversed. People don't want to
  fuck over their local coffee shop. But companies have
  consolidated into giant monopolistic mega corps with no humanity
  that try to fuck you over, which makes returning the favor an
  enticing idea.
 
Dunnorandom - 3 hours ago
You don't even have to fake a QR code to get into a lounge: There
was a case in Germany a few years ago where someone bought a fully
flexible business class ticket, used it to enter the business
lounge in Munich and then rebooked it to another day from inside
the lounge.After doing that 36 times, Lufthansa noticed it and sent
him a bill over 1980? (55? per lounge visit). He refused to pay,
got sued and lost.Source (in German):
http://www.justiz.bayern.de/gericht/ag/m/presse/archiv/2014/...
 
  cfontes - 3 hours ago
  There is also a Chinese case but he did it for a whole
  year.http://nypost.com/2014/01/29/man-uses-first-class-plane-
  tick...
 
    13of40 - 2 hours ago
    I keep meaning to do that someday, just so I can say I've done
    it, but if you think about it the hassle of traveling to the
    airport, going through security, paying $12 for a cocktail in a
    sterile room full of strangers, etc. would probably make for an
    overall crappy experience.Edit:  Oh, now that I clicked the
    link I see he got to eat for free.  Hmmm...
 
      bdamm - 1 hours ago
      Also useful if you have somewhere to fly on an economy
      ticket. Noteworthy is that often the alcohol is free, along
      with the food. Having flown business on a couple of trips I
      can tell you with 100% certainty that I'd rather wait in the
      lounge than out at the gates. Because, beds & showers.
 
      ubernostrum - 31 minutes ago
      If you're going to do it, do it properly and get a first-
      class ticket on Lufthansa. At their hub in Frankfurt, first-
      class passengers get their own private terminal. Here's a
      sample:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzI1dSnLKxg
 
      kchoudhu - 1 hours ago
      Actually, the cocktail is more than likely free.The sterility
      of airport lounges is also HIGHLY questionable.
 
  [deleted]
 
  imgabe - 1 hours ago
  Wouldn't that business class ticket cost thousands of dollars?
  You can usually buy a lounge pass for a yearly fee of a few
  hundred.
 
    nikanj - 1 hours ago
    Yes, but business tickets often are 100% refundable
 
      toweringgoat - 1 hours ago
      No they aren't. You can choose to buy refundable business
      fares, much as you can buy refundable economy fares. But the
      default is non-refundable tickets with hundreds of dollars
      high change fees.Some business travellers do buy mostly
      refundable tickets, but they specifically have to select them
      regardless of class of travel. Tickets bought on day of
      travel also tend to be refundable since that's often the only
      fare that can be sold close to departure.
 
  SilasX - 1 hours ago
  Yes.  AIUI, German law seems to draw heavily from the school of
  thought that "obviously you're not supposed to do that, jerk, now
  pay up".  American law prefers to say, "oh, crud, you caught us.
  Add it to the ever-lengthening terms of service (that no one
  reads) so we can prove you agreed you wouldn't do it."
 
    m_mueller - 15 minutes ago
    It goes both ways though. You can use the intent of a law as a
    defense in court. It gives more power to judges to interpret
    things, which can be seen as a disadvantage. Overall I'd still
    rather have that - in the American legal system I feel like the
    law being a sword of damocles over my head, constantly waiting
    for me to inadvertently walk into a trap, while with a European
    civil law system I get the feeling that the system works for me
    as long as I don't have bad intents (i.e. as long as my inner
    moral matches that of the culture I'm in).
 
  driverdan - 1 hours ago
  I know people who have done this too, just not abusing it like
  that guy. If it's a 100% refundable ticket you can get into the
  airport and so long as you reschedule or cancel before boarding
  you're good.
 
pcl - 2 hours ago
Here's the text from the QR code in the YouTube video:>
M1SIMPSON/BARTHOLOMEWMEXYZ123 ISTLGWTK 1965 099C005A0015 100Looks
like XYZ123 is the PNR and TK 1965 is the flight number. I haven't
looked at how the 099... field is encoded yet, but it appears to be
date + class of service + checkin sequence number.
 
  CSDude - 1 hours ago
  Its Bart Simpson
 
  mittermayr - 1 hours ago
  Looks like page 27 has the format:
  http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/stb/Documents/BCBP-
  Implementati...Starts with M1.
 
AlexCoventry - 1 hours ago
I've never been in one of those lounges... Do they contain anything
worth committing fraud for? Cool trick either way, though.
 
  URSpider94 - 1 hours ago
  It really depends. In the USA, the biggest benefit is that you
  can set your bags down and go to the can without worrying they
  are going to get stolen or carted off by bomb disposal. Also, you
  get free WiFi.In other countries, airports tend to be more
  spartan, and the lounges nicer. Many of the Asian carriers offer
  sushi, noodle bars, top-shelf drinks, and showers.
 
  OxO4 - 1 hours ago
  The one in the video (IST) is actually very nice, there is lots
  of space (especially compared to the rest of the airport, which
  is usually very crowded), free food and drinks (including alcohol
  and decent, non-drip coffee).
 
  jamesmishra - 1 hours ago
  They have good food and alcohol. They also have unusually nice
  fellow passengers that are worth talking to.A friend of mine took
  me into airport lounges a few times, and they were all pretty
  nice experiences.
 
  [deleted]
 
  callahad - 56 minutes ago
  For the most part, Western lounges just feel like hotel lobbies,
  but with free booze and buffets. Significantly quieter than the
  main terminals, genuinely helpful staff, clean bathrooms,
  etc.Great if you have access, but nothing I'd go out of my way to
  pay for.One exception: Showers. Holy hell is it an amazing
  feeling to take a shower half-way through a 20+ hour itinerary.
  Worth their weight in gold.
 
lexicality - 3 hours ago
The talk in question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnq0UfOUTlM