GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-04) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Man Who Picked Victorian London's Unpickable Lock
54 points by benbreen
http://mentalfloss.com/article/501820/man-who-picked-victorian-l...
ctorian-londons-unpickable-lock
___________________________________________________________________
 
ljoshua - 2 hours ago
> Patented in 1818, the Detector spent decades as one of England?s
greatest assurances. Whatever valuables lay beyond the lock were
guaranteed to remain safe and secure, immune to even the most
sophisticated or skilled attempts at a breach.When transported to
the current day conceptions around the strength of cryptography,
this particular line makes me also think of Dr. Janek's line from
Sneakers, where while discussing the virtues of encryption, he
says:> The numbers are so unbelievably big, all the computers in
the world could not break them down. But maybe, just maybe, there's
a shortcut.Not that I hope we find a shortcut any time soon, but
time has a way of letting us discover interesting shortcuts, be
they lockpicking strategies or prime number weaknesses.
 
robbrown451 - 2 hours ago
Too bad the article doesn't have more technical details on how the
locks worked and how it was picked.
 
spraak - 2 hours ago
I feel left hanging after reading the article. It doesn't really
detail much at all about how Hobbs was able to pick the
locks.Further, Mental Floss itself seems to have in place one of
those "you can't click back" mechanisms that spams your back button
history.
 
Animats - 1 hours ago
The first half of the 19th century was the "iron era" of
impregnable safes.  With enough iron, you could make something that
would effectively resist physical attack.  Explosives weren't
powerful enough yet - dynamite, nitroglycerine, TNT, and C4, let
alone shaped charges, were in the future.  Black powder would just
leave scorch marks.  Acetylene torches and thermic lances hadn't
been developed yet.  High speed steel drill bits didn't exist yet.
Cobalt, carbide, tungsten, and diamond tools were a century away.
Power tools required a nearby steam engine.  Hammer and chisel was
about it, and banging on cold iron with cold iron is a very slow
process.Theft from safes thus focused on lock-picking and getting
hold of the keys. The latter was usually more effective.[1]I can't
find a picture on line of the setup used to pick Bramah's lock, but
I've seen a drawing. The lock design was much like today's round
bike locks - push-down pins. There's an easy way to open those
today using a Bic pen cap.[2]  Modern ones are just pin tumbler
locks in a different form factor.  Bramah's lock was a lever lock
in round form.  Hobbs used a custom-made picking setup with a
thumbscrew and calibrated dial for each lever. This allowed setting
any combination of depths and reproducing it later.  Now exhaustive
search was possible. Hobbs took most of a month to do the job. It
wasn't really a useful attack, but it shook people up.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gold_Robbery [2]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LahDQ2ZQ3e0
 
  mannykannot - 1 hours ago
  This link explains how the lock worked and discusses picking
  techniques, though not Hobbs' methods specifically. I vaguely
  remember reading that his equipment included a device to apply a
  small torque to the cylinder, via a lever arm with a short
  pendulum on its end. Any movement of the cylinder as a slot
  aligned with the shear line ring was revealed by the swinging of
  the pendulum.The use of shallow decoy slots indicate that Bramah
  had anticipated this form of attack, but they only served to
  delay the solution.http://crypto.com/photos/misc/bramah/
 
ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
This is apparently a Brahma lock key:
https://img0.etsystatic.com/113/0/11210336/il_fullxfull.9705...(or
at least a replication of one)Which I found interesting because it
suggests the 'tube' key was well known in the 19th century and all
this time I thought it was a 20th century invention.
 
Artemis2 - 3 hours ago
As usual, there is an excellent 99% Invisible episode:
http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/perfect-security/
 
droffel - 3 hours ago
If you enjoyed this article, check out the 99% Invisible podcast's
"Perfect Security" episode. It covers a lot of the same
information, and is a good
listen.http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/perfect-security/
 
dano - 1 hours ago
Matt Blaze opened up a Bramah lock in
2003.http://www.crypto.com/photos/misc/bramah/
 
komali2 - 56 minutes ago
>Writing of the Bramah breach in 1851, Living Age magazine wondered
what would become of a population that could no longer rely upon
locks to protect their material goods: ?The best substitute for the
lock on the safe," the author wrote, "is honesty in the heart.?I've
wondered this after extensive travels through Asia - is there a way
to prescribe how to change your culture to make thievery rare
simply by making it culturally unacceptable? Perhaps there are
other reasons Tokyo's petty crime rate is so low compared to other
major cities (legal system, welfare system, education system), but
I feel that all those reasons come down to the same root reason - a
culture.