GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-01) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Mozilla launches voice search, file-sharing and note-taking tools
for Firefox
192 points by denchikceo
https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/01/mozilla-launches-experimental-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
r3bl - 4 hours ago
I've seen all the promo videos, and some questions remain
unanswered:1. What's Send encrypting with? It doesn't show anything
related to setting up a password during the video.2. What's Notes
syncing with?3. What's Voice using to analyze the voice commands?
 
  detaro - 3 hours ago
  3. Kaldi
 
  soapdog - 2 hours ago
  2. Notes source code is at https://github.com/mozilla/notes, the
  panel.js source[1] is the one that saves and load content. It
  uses the Storage API from Web Extensions[2], but it uses it only
  to save/load locally. It is not currently sending any data
  anywhere. So, sync is not enabled. If you click the sync button,
  you're greeted with a message[3] saying it is not implemented yet
  (they do count it and metrify it, probably gauging interest).[1]:
  https://github.com/mozilla/notes/blob/6bae20ceb58c5f1487885f...[2
  ]: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Add-
  ons/WebExtensions/AP...[3]: http://take.ms/ieu4n
 
  wongarsu - 4 hours ago
  >What's Send encrypting with? It doesn't show anything related to
  setting up a password during the video.Likely a random string
  that is added to the download URL as Fragment (the part after #
  that doesn't get sent to the server).The download URLs look like 
  this:https://send.firefox.com/download/50d43ef5f3/#GqCJXOUnCyxYGc
  ...I agree that there is very little explanation beyond "look at
  this cool thing".
 
znpy - 1 hours ago
Mozilla is doing everything but what is supposed to do:make Firefox
blazing fast.
 
  toyg - 1 hours ago
  They actually did, the recent switch to multiprocessing made a
  massive difference. I've been happily using Vivaldi for a few
  months now, but I'm tempted to go back to FF as the speed gap has
  been wiped out of late - only cold startups are a bit slower,
  actual pageload is absolutely on par or better. This on Mac, at
  least, but I expect it will have been similar on other platforms.
 
albertzeyer - 4 hours ago
Some more information in the official blog post:
https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2017/08/01/new-test-pilot-expe...I
was especially interested in the Voice Fill (speech recognition)
technology. Landing page: https://testpilot.firefox.com/experiments
/voice-fillIt seems the project is here:
https://github.com/mozilla/speaktome/This seems as if it actually
is a webservice. From the code
(https://github.com/mozilla/speaktome/blob/master/extension/c...),
I see: const STT_SERVER_URL =
"https://speaktome.services.mozilla.com";Actually, I think this can
be very easily done fully client-side, with good accuracy. Even on
Android, the voice recognition can run client-side / offline.I
wonder if the project is in any way related to their DeepSpeech
project (https://github.com/mozilla/DeepSpeech). Maybe they use
DeepSpeech on the server-side? At some other place they call it
Pipsqueak, not sure if this is yet something else.And maybe also
related is their common voice project (https://voice.mozilla.org/).
Recent discussion here on HN
(https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14794654).Some more
information also here: https://research.mozilla.org/machine-
learning/
 
  detaro - 4 hours ago
  Here is the backend: https://github.com/mozilla/speech-proxy
  (which talks to Kaldi via I think https://github.com/api-ai/asr-
  server)
 
  fabrice_d - 4 hours ago
  "this can be very easily done fully client-side" : maybe, if you
  have the voice model and and inference engine that runs well on
  devices. Mozilla doesn't have that yet, so this experiment uses a
  backend running a Kaldi server and model that uses too much
  memory to run locally.Once DeepSpeech is ready I'm pretty sure
  they will switch to that, and ultimately to on-device voice
  recognition with PipSqueak (PipSqueak is expected to be an
  inference engine usable on devices). Unfortunately none of these
  projects are far along enough to be usable.Common Voice is mostly
  related to DeepSpeech as this will help getting data to train the
  engine.
 
retox - 1 hours ago
I just want to browse the web!
 
  Certhas - 1 hours ago
  What's stopping you? Optional experimental plug ins?
 
free2rhyme214 - 3 hours ago
None of these will get me to switch. Chrome is still faster than
Firefox, sorry Mozilla.
 
  [deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
dijit - 3 hours ago
I was interested in Send until I realised it wasn't p2p.:(
 
notheguyouthink - 5 hours ago
I just wish it was .. faster.Lately I've been moving away from
Google everywhere I can. I moved everything but Google Voice. Yes,
even Google Search - I've moved to DuckDuckGo. On windows however,
I had to fall back to Chrome, because I was just shocked at how
slow Firefox was.Opening pages like Twitch.tv proved to be
shockingly slow. Furthermore, my habit of opening many tabs in the
background like I do in Chrome/Safari was massively slower in
Firefox because while Chrome doesn't autoplay new-hidden tabs,
Firefox does - I imagine Chrome feels faster there because it's not
running nearly as much stuff at once.Pretty much everything of
Firefox felt slower for me. And this is from someone that really
wants to get away from Chrome! On OS X, I've long switched to
Safari and DuckDuckGo, and been quite happy. I've had zero
complaints about performance with Safari.So.. I don't know what
they need to do, but I'm really hoping they do something.
 
  jo77 - 1 hours ago
  This has a lot to do with the ever increasing incompetence of web
  devs than it has to do with Firefox imho. I do performance
  testing for a living and Firefox creams Chrome on sites where the
  devs know what they are doing. I don't think of Chrome as faster,
  but better designed to hide developer mistakes.  Chrome basically
  keeps the mediocre developer who can't rtfm in business just the
  same way Microsoft did back in the day. Same pointlessness on
  Android. I call it the Trump definition of success - pander to
  the lowest common denominator and pretend there isn't a price to
  be paid.
 
    leeoniya - 55 minutes ago
    speaking as a web dev who's obsessed with payload size, TTFB
    and web app performance, i find your statement to be patently
    false.i have well-written code that runs very fast in FF, and
    it always runs even faster in Chrome. not just JS, but also
    repaint and layout. FF does handle some absurd cases better:
    giant dom trees & scrolling, RAM usage, lazy tabs.as a long-
    time Firefox bug hunter and nightly user, i hope
    Firefox/Quantum & Servo can reverse this pattern, for sure.
 
  ohthehugemanate - 19 minutes ago
  When did you try?I've been on Firefox developer edition for
  awhile now, because it's just SO MUCH FASTER than chrome,
  especially on high tab volume.
 
  CommanderData - 3 hours ago
  Google does not want you to move from their services and
  APIs.Chrome/Chromium, as a recent example allowed serviceURI in
  Web Speech APIs for third party recognition to be plugged in.
  Here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-
  US/docs/Web/API/SpeechRecog...It was dropped in Chrome 49 and
  we're now all stuck with using Google. There has been little
  coverage on this, some speculated it was hardly implemented, or
  was dropped because lack of a standard API format.Whatever the
  case. Google / Chrome choose not to fully develop that feature
  and its now gone. Which ultimately works in Googles favor.
 
    notheguyouthink - 2 hours ago
    I mean, I don't care what Google wants lol. I've moved
    everything except Chrome on Windows, and Google Voice because
    of no replacement.I'm not complaining because I'm locked in by
    Google, I've switched to Safari on OS X with no issue at all -
    I don't miss Chrome in the slightest. Yet, on Windows, Firefox
    is proving to be a hurdle.It's on Mozilla, not Google. Imo
 
      [deleted]
 
  sirfz - 7 minutes ago
  What does "faster" mean? honest question. I've been using Firefox
  since its early days and never jumped on the Chrome bandwagon
  simply because I didn't see the need to do so. When Firefox felt
  slow, it usually was the whole operating system that's slow and
  neither Chrome or any other browser could solve that. Nowadays,
  all the machines I use are powerful enough to not feel any such
  slowness and I just don't understand what is this "speed" people
  keep attributing to Chrome and what is so "slow" in Firefox
  (regardless of that fact they're working on speeding it up).In
  addition, Chrome recently crashed on me multiple times while
  using Google Spreadsheet which is supposed to work better with
  Chrome than other browsers.
 
  joelrunyon - 4 hours ago
  Weirdly enough - I found gmail was running VERY slow on Chrome. I
  switched to the Brave browser and it's been blazing fast.Weird
  that Google products don't even seem to run the best on their own
  products.
 
    notheguyouthink - 2 hours ago
    Do you like Brave? I've not done too much research on alternate
    browsers, but at this point as long as I trust the company I'd
    be willing to try it.Cliqz is another one I thought about
    trying, but it is based on Firefox so I'm a bit dismayed haha.
 
      joelrunyon - 11 minutes ago
      I do!It has some issues with sites because of cookie storage
      + I believe it disables scripts - but it's really fast :)
 
    dingdingdang - 2 hours ago
    Routinely have similar issues with gmail/chrome whereas I never
    have any issues on Firefox. Odd.
 
  problems - 5 hours ago
  > I just wish it was .. faster.They're working on it, to see the
  progress, install nightly (which is already a huge improvement)
  and turn on servo CSS for an extra boost. It feels much faster.
 
  eridius - 4 hours ago
  Firefox stable feels relatively slow. Firefox nightly is really
  snappy, especially with Stylo enabled.Also, go to about:config,
  and make sure preloading is turned on. I checked it last week and
  for some reason it was turned off, even though I don't recall
  ever doing that.
 
  richardboegli - 1 hours ago
  Pale Moon, been using it for a few years OR Chromium.
 
  lol768 - 4 hours ago
  Personally I've found the recent Nightly with the new Rust CSS
  engine to be pretty snappy. I'd say anecdotally faster than
  Chrome.There was also a recent post regarding having large
  numbers of tabs open in Firefox (see
  https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14823807) and it did pretty
  well.
 
    notheguyouthink - 1 hours ago
    Yea I'm definitely going to try switching to Nightly based on
    the comments here. As well as adjusting some of the
    configuration. Thanks!
 
      adito - 51 minutes ago
      Would you comment back here and gives your first impression
      on it? How fast is it compared to stable.
 
  robin_reala - 4 hours ago
  The auto playing issue is fixed and making its way down towards
  general release.
 
  karolg - 2 hours ago
  Option to disable autoplay in background tabs exists in Firefox
  for so long that I forgot it isn't enabled by default.Go to
  about:config and set: media.block-autoplay-until-in-foreground =
  trueIn older versions they used another config variable media
  .block-play-until-visible .There is also media.suspend-bkgnd-
  video.enabled to stop decoding video in background tabs after set
  amount of time (10s default).
 
  artursapek - 4 hours ago
  It doesn't help that they keep cramming features into Firefox.
  Chrome feels pretty bare in comparison.
 
    soapdog - 3 hours ago
    Many of said features are just bundled web extensions, add-ons,
    so they don't pollute the main code base. Please, don't spread
    FUD when it is not needed.
 
    pcwalton - 3 hours ago
    Chrome has consisted of significantly (i.e. millions of lines)
    more code than Firefox has for quite a while now.
 
      H4CK3RM4N - 40 minutes ago
      I feel like I heard that a Chrome install was comparable in
      size to an average Linux install a year or two ago.
 
    [deleted]
 
    c0nducktr - 4 hours ago
    The features they're 'cramming' into Firefox don't slow down
    the browser.
 
  aluhut - 4 hours ago
  I have Chrome as reference to my FF here and since their
  beginning, it never was faster again. As in every FF post, there
  will be people saying that and the opposite. I guess the
  difference depends on other factors like Addons or Plugins as
  well as the probably narrow difference between both.I never
  really came upon a reason to leave FF behind. It works good, has
  all the addons, and I can still make it look like a real window
  with options and things where they should be. I also have a
  "special" relationship to Chrome due to this "bundling to
  freeware" they use to push the browser onto people who don't want
  it.@your tab problem: I just googled this up
  https://addons.mozilla.org/de/firefox/addon/load-tab-on-sele...
  No idea how good it is though since I never felt I'd need
  that.There is a solution/addon for everything ;)
 
  fpgaminer - 4 hours ago
  It's getting there.  They recently added multiprocess support.  A
  new CSS engine is coming.  In the further future we're going to
  get more and more pieces of their new rendering engine
  in.Personally, I dropped Chrome 2 years ago or so, for the same
  reasons (moving away from everything Google that I reasonably
  can).  Firefox is more painful to use, for sure, but it's gotten
  "okay" enough that I'm willing to keep using it in favor of its
  benefits (privacy).By the way:  In Firefox, open `about:support`
  and check that "Multiprocess Windows" says something like "2/2
  (enabled by Default", where the numbers can really be anything
  but 0.  If it's disabled, that means your Firefox isn't using the
  new multiprocess support, most likely because you're running an
  incompatible addon.
 
  bhnmmhmd - 4 hours ago
  I always admired Mozilla for their efforts in making Firefox
  better. But I switched to Chrome many years ago. For me, the
  problem with FF was UI and UX.Chrome and Safari just feel more
  "smooth and sleek", and UI elements are consistent (Look how
  Chrome buttons are rounded-rectangles).The other reason I
  switched from FF was that Chrome has always been simply better.
  Sure, FF can handle many tabs, but I save that for times I want
  to work with Selenium or something. For an ordinary user (and
  even pros), Chrome just beats FF.
 
robfreudenreich - 4 hours ago
I don't know here Mozilla got their inspiration, but Send looks
pretty similar to our E2E encrypted file sharing app Whisply:
https://whisp.lyPS: Whisply even has more features and a detailed
description how its encryption works:
https://whisp.ly/static/whisplyTechnicalOverview_20151201.pd...
 
  [deleted]
 
  problems - 4 hours ago
  There's many such tools available, RiseUp runs one called Up1.
  See https://share.riseup.net/It's quite nice, has integrated
  image and video viewers as well as a pastebin all end-to-end
  encrypted.
 
    robfreudenreich - 4 hours ago
    Up1 looks nice, but is internally using SJCL which is slow and
    does not support bigger files ("This is not a problem with sub-
    10MB images"). Send - and Whisply - are built on the new
    WebCrypto APIs which are faster and allow bigger files, up to 1
    GB in both cases.
 
      [deleted]
 
JepZ - 1 hours ago
Sorry, but I will not use any speech recognition service until it
becomes a pure on-device service.
 
woranl - moments ago
Mozilla should focus on building the browser instead of building
app that competes with other developers. They need to start
listening to the developers community and stop being arrogant and
ignorant. You build the foundation, and developers build the app.
 
bad_user - 4 hours ago
I wonder what happens to the previous Test Pilot experiments.I
loved the experimental home page and the Tab Center [1]. I really
hope it continues to live.[1] https://github.com/bwinton/TabCenter
 
  lewisl9029 - 3 hours ago
  Tab Center Redux is the official successor to Tab Center:
  https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/tab-center-
  re...It's now a WebExtension, which means it will work in Firefox
  57+ (and possibly eventually Chrome, if they end up supporting
  the same APIs), and uses the new Sidebar APIs that the new Notes
  experiment also makes use of.If that doesn't fit your use cases,
  there are also quite a few new tab sidebar WebExtensions popping
  up that aim to replicate existing more sophisticated tab
  management extensions like Tree Styles Tabs
  (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/tree-tabs/), and
  others that try to innovate on their own terms, such as Sea
  Containers (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/sea-
  container...), which makes use of the new Containers
  experiment.Overall there is a huge amount of very promising new
  development in the WebExtensions space, and this is exactly the
  kind of innovation I had hoped WebExtensions would encourage.
 
  sp332 - 4 hours ago
  On the main https://testpilot.firefox.com/ page, scroll down and
  click "view past experiments". Each one gets a write-up when it's
  over.
 
    jgruen - 3 hours ago
    Hey, we're a little behind on writing up the last few
    experiments unfortunately. We'll be adding full reports over
    the next few weeks.
 
romanovcode - 4 hours ago
I hope Firefox succeeds and destroys Chrome.
 
  ece - 2 hours ago
  After the 54 release, it is the better browser frankly, low
  latency, and not a resource hog. Plugins, extensions, privacy and
  security defaults all seem to be better as well.Using firefox
  focus on android is pretty great too. The normal firefox on
  android is just slow, not sure why.
 
    [deleted]
 
mynewtb - 59 minutes ago
Opera 12 called and it's rotating in its grave. Unite was such an
amazing feature. And notes were available in Opera even before I
started using it. Opera, I miss you, it still hurts.
 
hexmiles - 4 hours ago
what will happen to test pilot after the non-webextension are not
allowed?As far i know must of these feature are implemented as
extension and i don't thing webextension have the api to do a lot
of thing that are in test pilot.
 
  fabrice_d - 20 minutes ago
  Note that Voice Fill is actually a WebExtension :
  https://github.com/mozilla/speaktome
 
  jgruen - 3 hours ago
  We're moving to a webExtensiony future. The idea here is that
  we'll be a first party consumer of the webExtension APIs so we
  can help test/drive/expand capabilities.
 
  sp332 - 4 hours ago
  They will have to adapt. For now they're using data from the
  experiments to guide API development. For example, the Tab Center
  experiment used old APIs, but now they've expended the new API
  and are building a new Tab Center Redux extension at the same
  time. https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/tab-center-
  re...
 
eridius - 4 hours ago
send.firefox.com says that my browser (Safari) is unsupported.
Anyone know what particular "web technology" the site uses that
Safari doesn't support?
 
  sp332 - 3 hours ago
  This is the only one I can think of, not sure why that site would
  require it though. https://caniuse.com/#feat=input-file-directory
 
    eridius - 3 hours ago
    Found it. It's checking for window.crypto.subtle. Looks like
    Safari TP supports this. I believe the problem with Safari 10
    is that it implemented an older version of the web cryptography
    standard.
 
      jgruen - 2 hours ago
      yep
 
15charlimit - 1 hours ago
But why?It's a browser. All it should do (and do well) is display
content.I don't want a bunch of extra garbage tossed in because it
sounds good on some marketing slide.Chrome has been and continues
to eat FF's marketshare alive because it has been both faster and
lighter. More junk is not going to help FF beat them.
 
  Certhas - 1 hours ago
  Firefox is as fast and lighter, and has been for a while (the
  exception being Googles own webapps that are heavily Chrome
  optimized). This is stuff they are testing out in TestPilot, so
  it's for people who want to go add the TestPilot add on and then
  selectively enable these features.So your complaint really makes
  zero sense.
 
Dirlewanger - 1 hours ago
I wish they'd stop focusing on the flavor-of-the-week technology
gimmick bullshit and focus on making Firefox the better performing
browser. Chrome outperforms it in nearly every way by margins that
grow with every release. My reasons for sticking with FF grow fewer
every day.
 
  ancarda - 1 hours ago
  Are Mozilla paying for people to do these experiments or is it
  people sending patches? I don't know but I'd imagine a lot of it
  is the latter.Have you tried a recent Nightly? Firefox is getting
  faster: http://www.techradar.com/news/firefoxs-blazing-speed-
  with-hu... [1]. As Mozilla continues to pull in code from Servo
  and implement e10s, Fiefox will perform better and crash less.[1]
  discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14848836
 
  ohthehugemanate - 16 minutes ago
  Try developer edition or beta to get a taste of the work they've
  put into speed. I ditched chrome for FF and haven't looked back
  because even a year ago, developer edition was so much faster...
  Especially on heavy tab loads.Iirc the speed changes can't start
  landing in stable until November, because of the shift to
  Webextensions.
 
mrspeaker - 4 hours ago
I feel like I must be reaching the "get off my lawn" phase of my
life, because I can't even comprehend a situation where I'd ever
want to talk at my browser... maybe when I'm at home alone and,
couldn't type for some reason? Certainly not in the office. Am I
missing a use case, or am I just old now?
 
  soapdog - 3 hours ago
  There are many use cases for this, among them:* Mobile version of
  Firefox. It might be easier to talk to fill a form on mobile than
  type on glass screen.* Accessibility. There is a huge under
  served demography of people who will welcome this as typing might
  be hard for them.You may not be on any of the groups above but
  that doesn't invalidate the features.
 
  sp332 - 3 hours ago
  Lots of people are faster at speaking than typing. Or maybe
  you're reading from a document (or pill bottle) and don't want to
  type with one hand or whatever. But what I usually use it for is
  if I'm having a conversation with someone and we want to look
  something up. It feels more anti-social to type silently for a
  while than to make the computer part of the conversation.
 
    mrspeaker - 3 hours ago
    But it's only for searching after you've already navigated to a
    search engine, right? You'd have to be extremely slow at peck-
    and-hunting for it to save you much time (especially as search
    strings are so short) - and in the video you have to click
    "submit" to even do the search (and then presumably navigate
    normally with mouse). I can't see many instances where this
    could be worth it. Maybe I'm actually too young to see why it's
    useful!
 
      burkaman - 3 hours ago
      Maybe the search engine is your homepage, or you just have to
      hit "g" and enter to get there, or it's bookmarked. Maybe you
      don't have hands, but you have an easy way to move a mouse
      around and click. Maybe you're eating a sandwich with one
      hand and don't feel like putting it down. Maybe you won't use
      it for a short query like "weather", but you will for
      sentence-long queries. Maybe you want to search "linux won't
      recognize wireless keyboard".It's very easy to think of
      instances where this will be helpful.
 
    rdiddly - 3 hours ago
    Faster than typing would be great.  What's not so great (or so
    fast) is trying 3 or 4 times by voice and having to go type it
    anyway because the accuracy's not there.  Sooo, like my old-
    aged ancient geriatric friend in the parent, I too still
    preferentially go to the keyboard, since I figure I'll probably
    end up there anyway.  If it's a social situation I usually
    preface the typing with some variation of "All right let's see
    here..." which sounds like I'm trying to figure out something
    hard or ask something of the Great Oracle, but really it just
    means "I'm about to type."Maybe once speech recognition
    advances a bit more...
 
    rodolphoarruda - 3 hours ago
    I work in the online learning industry, mainly with higher
    education institutions. One of the top features required by
    instructors is the ability to provide audio feedback to
    students. And this is really a huge benefit for them because
    most instructors are not fast typists and they have hundreds of
    assignments to review every once in a while.
 
  buovjaga - 3 hours ago
  "Firefox! I've fallen and I can't get up!"
 
  ikurei - 3 hours ago
  Actually, people who are very deep into the "get off my lawn"
  phase of their life, that is old people, are generally not the
  greatest typists. For them, the ability to talk instead of type,
  everywhere and not just in google search (which already has this)
  seems like a huge help.I'll never use it. It's completely useless
  to me. But if my grandma actually did anything else than Facebook
  on her computer I'd show this to her.
 
    goalieca - 24 minutes ago
    > that is old people, are generally not the greatest
    typists.Well.. and we're just fine with it. Simple works better
    somethings and why be in such a hurry sometimes. I look at
    these young whipersnappers who fly around the computer with
    windows attacking from all directions. They just seem to make
    things complicated without actually meeting the goal any
    faster.
 
  vikiomega9 - 2 hours ago
  Just to clarify these features are not yet on the release.