GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Google and a nuclear fusion company have developed a new algorithm
182 points by jonbaer
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jul/25/google-enter...
___________________________________________________________________
 
suzzer99 - 2 hours ago
Am I the only one that never reads these articles but just goes
straight to the comments? It seems like reporters always get the
facts bungled and go for the simple story - out of necessity of
course.
 
  trhway - 2 hours ago
  for me it is about page loading - pretty much straightforward
  successful and predictable on HN and slow and/or heavy, jerking
  current position/scroll around and full of whatever else
  surprises the page of the source. I want to know what it is about
  immediately, i.e. basically it is an issue of instant
  gratification for me :) If information on the HN comments page
  isn't enough (which is rare), or the source is really
  vouched/confirmed to be interesting by itself - then i take the
  bullet.
 
    suzzer99 - 1 hours ago
    I bet you love usatoday.com.
 
  twic - 1 hours ago
  I also do this. HN comment pages are extremely varied in their
  quality, but they do tend to be good at shooting down articles
  which aren't as good as their titles suggest. Plus, HN loads
  fast. So, open the comments, check to see if the article might be
  worth reading, and if so, open it, flip back to the main page
  while the article loads.
 
  TaylorAlexander - 2 hours ago
  On this article I clicked on it, realized The Guardian was going
  to be waaay to general, and then went to the comments knowing I
  would find a quick break down of the facts written by "my people"
  for an audience like me.Often I'll skip the article entirely.
 
    suzzer99 - 2 hours ago
    Yep - same thing with that "Roomba is selling maps of your
    home" thing that's going around. Turns out they're considering
    partnering with Alexa or something, and you'd have to opt in of
    course. I just skipped straight to the comments to get the real
    scoop instantly.
 
  dekhn - 1 hours ago
  I often jump straight to comments, but I think Google's blog post
  for this is required reading:
  https://research.googleblog.com/2017/07/so-there-i-was-firin...
 
ZenoArrow - 3 hours ago
Sounds like some promising results, hopefully this approach will
continue to be useful.Addressing the wider article, it always
surprises me that the focus fusion approach is never mentioned in
fusion articles put out by the mainstream media. I don't know what
to attribute that to, but it's surprising that one of the most
promising fusion approaches is constantly overlooked.To give an
idea how drastically overlooked focus fusion is, here's a graph
showing R&D budgets for different fusion
projects...http://lppfusion.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/fusion-
funds...... and here's a graph showing energy efficiency of fusion
devices (running on deuterium I believe)...http://lppfusion.com/wp-
content/uploads/2016/05/wall-plug-ch...You'd think that the second
most efficient device would've gotten more than $5 million in
funding over 20 years (I think the original funding was from NASA
back in 1994).
 
  [deleted]
 
  dwringer - 1 hours ago
  Maybe it is just confusion in terminology.  I always thought
  "focus fusion" had something to do with attention processing -
  i.e. focusing on multiple (or cycled in rapid succession)
  distinct concepts at once where each maps to a different mental
  schema and leveraging the tendency of these schema to gradually
  take on characteristics of one another until they form a coherent
  integrated concept map.  It was not an uncommon topic of
  discussion online back in the 1990's, although I have not heard
  much open discussion about it in nearly two decades.  IIRC this
  was a big contributing factor to the development of OOP and
  something the facilitation of which was a primary objective of
  places like SRI's Augmentation Research Center in the days of
  Douglas Engelbart.  Incidentally the rumor at the time (late
  90's/2000?) was that Google had taken over commercial
  applications of such research (most of which I presume is still
  classified, considering how little discussion there is about it).
 
grnadav1 - 2 hours ago
You jusk KNOW Elon Musk is gonna beat'em to it ;)
 
abefetterman - 3 hours ago
This is actually a really exciting development to me. (Note, what
is exciting is the "optometrist algorithm" from the paper [1] not
necessarily googles involvement as pitched in the guardian).
Typically a day of shots would need to be programmed out in
advance, typically scanning over one dimension (out of hundreds) at
a time. It would then take at least a week to analyze the results
and create an updated research plan. The result is poor utilization
of each experiment in optimizing performance. The 50% reduction in
losses is a big deal for Tri Alpha.I can see this being coupled
with simulations as well to understand sources of systematic
errors, create better simulations which can then be used as a
stronger source of truth for "offline" (computation-only)
experiments.The biggest challenge of course becomes interpreting
the results. So you got better performance, what parameters really
made a difference and why? But that is at least a more tractable
problem than "how do we make this better in the first place?"[1]
http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06645-7
 
  jlarocco - 3 hours ago
  As a complete outsider, I don't understand what's special about
  the "optometrist algorithm."  As described in the Nature article
  it's just hill climbing using humans as the evaluation
  function.Isn't it basically the same thing they were already
  doing but more granular?
 
    abefetterman - 2 hours ago
    Basically nobody was using automated gradient descent / etc
    because of the proclivity of these algorithms to get stuck on a
    boundary. The problem is the boundaries are not well defined.
    One example might be a catastrophic instability. If it gets
    triggered it has the potential to damage the machine. But the
    exact parameters in which the instability occurs are not well
    known. So with this algorithm you mix the best of both worlds:
    the human can guide away from the areas where we think
    instabilities are, the machine can do it's optimization thing.
    It's pretty simple overall but enables a big shift in how
    experiments are run.Edit to add: these instabilities often look
    just like better performance on a shot-to-shot basis, which
    makes the algos especially tricky. Using a human we could say
    "this parameter change is just feeding the instability" vs "oh
    this is interesting go here"
 
      hyperbovine - 2 hours ago
      To be clear: there are no gradients here (right?) This is
      just 0th order hill-climbing with a human assist.
 
        ouid - 2 hours ago
        how does one climb a hill with no gradient? [serious
        question]
 
          deepnotderp - 53 minutes ago
          Finite differences, you estimate the gradient.
 
          dmurray - 1 hours ago
          You can climb a hill without knowing the gradient, so
          long as you can compare two points in terms of height.
          You randomly move in some direction, then compare the new
          point to the old point, go to whichever of them is
          higher, and repeat.This sounds like what the
          experimenters are doing. Perhaps the GP was alluding to
          "first order hill climbing" as evaluating the gradient in
          every direction and climbing the steepest one, but the
          "0th order" version is also usually considered hill
          climbing and is better for some classes of problem.
 
          noobermin - 1 hours ago
          That is exactly what they're doing. See the section on
          Exploratory Technique, second to last paragraph. As I
          said above, the possible innovation here is they can
          change midstream the criteria one uses to decide what is
          a "better shot".
 
          ouid - 1 hours ago
          is it picking a new configuration at random, or does it
          still have to be "close" to the last configuration?
 
          dmurray - 38 minutes ago
          It still has to be close by some metric to be considered
          hill climbing. The article doesn't make it clear, but I
          suspect a lot of the insight in the algorithm is how the
          computer chooses two similar sets of inputs that differ
          in an "interesting" way.
 
          Govindae - 2 hours ago
          The naive way to do calculus. Use secants to approximate
          the tangent. I think it's called finite difference.
 
      noobermin - 1 hours ago
      I am still very skeptical that a human is really that good at
      avoiding the problem areas, although they might be marginally
      better. Plus, they don't seem to claim that anywhere in the
      paper, instead, they just rated shots as either "better"
      or"just as good", ie., a local evaluation which won't let you
      avoid such areas, which of course is a judgement that
      requires more knowledge than just the conditions in the
      neighborhood of the current reference.The only thing I think
      that can lead someone to your conclusion is they can judge
      based on a host of criteria, not just a pre-defined set of
      criteria--may be that's what you meant.  Of course,
      intuitively, changing your criteria midstream would lead to
      bias in your judgement, I'd think, but that may be the real
      innovation here, that is hard to do without a human judge in
      the mix.
 
        erikpukinskis - 9 minutes ago
        > I am still very skeptical that a human is really that
        good at avoiding the problem areasWhy? Humans have a much
        richer model than any computer does right now. We can draw
        on an effectively infinite set of possible models
        simultaneously. Experts in math and physics can narrow to a
        smaller but still huge array of sensical models. Existing
        AIs wouldn't even know where to start.The AI doesn't even
        have an intrinsic sense of space, seeing has how it lacks a
        body. It's a very fast worker that can get things done when
        you give it very specific instructions, but it has no real
        ability to understand what it is doing or why it would want
        to do something different.
 
  amelius - 1 hours ago
  Perhaps a stupid question, but why can't the whole experiment be
  run as a simulation?
 
    noobermin - 1 hours ago
    The system is fundamentally 6^N dimensional with N~10^23.
 
      sixdimensional - 50 minutes ago
      Yeah, 6^N dimensions are fun! ;)
 
    zaph0d_ - 57 minutes ago
    Even if this would be the dream of a lot of theoretical
    physicists to replace experiments with simulations, this must
    not happen! Ever! Even if every complex system in the world
    could be simulated in reasonable time it would still require
    experiments to verify or falsify the simulation results. A
    simulation is essentially just a calculation from a model
    someone came up with to describe a system. In order to check
    how good the model is one has to check it against experimental
    data. Just expanding the models without experimental
    verification will not necessarily result in a good theoretical
    description. It would be like writing software without testing
    the components and expecting it to work correctly when you're
    done. There was recently an article on HN where economists were
    described as the astrologers of our time [1] since they do not
    verify their mathematical models to an extent where they can
    predict economical systems. This is another example where more
    experimental data should be considered in order to falsify
    certain theories.Those are the reasons why string-theorist will
    not (and should not) get any Nobel price in the next decades.
    Since its predictions are hard to measure on those small scales
    there's no way of telling if the model is any good until it is
    compared against suitable experimental data.[1]
    https://aeon.co/essays/how-economists-rode-maths-to-become-o...
 
      scoofy - 26 minutes ago
      Agreed. My background is philosophy, and while i rarely get
      into the STEM arguments. This has everything to do with
      inductive learning vs deductive learning. Any simulation will
      be run with the premises already built in, but cutting edge
      science is always about learning what those premises are. If
      we knew what they were, it'd be trivial to set up the
      reactor. Here we need inductive experimentation to learn how
      to simulate it trivially.
 
      amelius - 22 minutes ago
      I believe this is more about solving an
      engineering/mathematics problem, than about fundamental
      physics and the scientific process.
 
yousefvi - 47 minutes ago
As a psychologist, this looks an awful lot like computerized
adaptive testing methods, only instead of estimating some parameter
vector about a person, you're estimating some parameter vector
about plasma.Even the title "optometrist algorithm" is telling,
because that paradigm is a basic model for how a lot of testing is
done, except that it's not the optometrist doing it, it's a
computer.
 
hailmike - 3 hours ago
I want to start placing "Google and " before stating my
accomplishments."Google and a nuclear fusion company have developed
a new algorithm"sounds way better than:"Nuclear fusion company has
developed a new algorithm using Google"They may not mean the same,
but in today's world faking it until you make it might pay off.
 
JohnJamesRambo - 4 hours ago
Google didn't enter the race.  They helped a company with some
calculations.
 
  dang - 3 hours ago
  Ok, we changed the title to the first sentence of the article,
  which basically says that.
 
    grayhatter - 3 hours ago
    thank you! I was very confused... twice...
 
dwaltrip - 3 hours ago
There was a talk about the state of nuclear fusion by some MIT
folks linked here on HN a few days ago. One of the biggest
takeaways was that many fusion efforts are very far away (3 to 6+
orders of magnitude) on the most important metric, Q, which is
energy_out / energy_in. Additionally, much press and public
discussion completely fail to discuss this and other core factors
that actually matter for making fusion viable.I remember Tri-alpha
being listed on one of the slides near the bottom left of the plot,
4 or 5 orders of magnitude away from break even, where Q = 1
(someone please correct me if I'm remembering incorrectly).Is the
50% improvement described in the article meaningful, as that would
only be a fraction of an order of magnitude?I understand the
broader concept of combining experts and specialized software on
complex problems is a powerful idea -- I'm just wondering if this
specific result actually changes the game for Tri-alpha.
 
  hyperbovine - 2 hours ago
  But hey, string ~20 consecutive 50% improvements together and
  you're at four orders of magnitude :-)
 
  a1371 - 2 hours ago
  I also watched that MIT talk and it was quite insightful;
  however, as I searched a bit more, I realized that the metrics
  involved in the presentation are only for achieving surplus in
  the generated energy from fusion.When it comes to industrializing
  the idea, the scope is far broader. For example, the speaker was
  saying that they can use the neutron streams as the result of
  fusion for creating tritium. In reality, capturing the neutrons
  is much more complex than that [1]. Some of those may deposit on
  the inner surface of the tokamak and have to be recovered by 99%
  to have breakeven. The nuclear waste is another concern in the
  opposite case.Given all these, you get a sense that why companies
  like General Fusion [2] get funded. He showed that General Fusion
  is very far away in his metrics. But the pinching technology the
  company is offering, allows for continuous use of the fusion in
  rapid bursts (like an automatic rifle). When I met them at the
  Globe conference, they were claiming that they will be ready for
  production within 5 years of achieving a surplus. I am not sure
  how fast the tokamak can get there.Source: 1.
  http://thebulletin.org/fusion-reactors-not-what-they%E2%80%9...
  2. http://generalfusion.com/
 
  trhway - 2 hours ago
  >One of the biggest takeaways was that many fusion efforts are
  very far away (3 to 6+ orders of magnitude) on the most important
  metric, Q, which is energy_out / energy_in.NIF got breakeven on
  energy_out_of_laser. Granted that just on the scale of 1-2% of
  initial energy. Well, it were old, non-semiconductor lasers.
  Laser diodes have 50% efficiency. They of course still need to be
  focused and pulse formed which will cause losses, yet it is much
  closer to the real breakeven. Unfortunately, no more NIF, or more
  precisely after closing the fusion work they did start building
  super powerful laser diode arrays for somebody else for some
  other purposes.Check out Sandia Z as well. Similar results, only
  with even  better energy delivery efficiency - the energy-to-Xray
  conversion there being like 15%. Again, nobody is in a rush to
  make good fusion. Political will ( translation - Congress-ionally
  approved funds) is just not there.
 
  le-mark - 2 hours ago
  I also watched that video, and was also a bit dismayed. It seemed
  to me that a lot of projects with the very low Q numbers weren't
  at the point of going for high Q numbers. The project I follow is
  Polywell[1], and my understanding is they've been working on
  confirming the physics of their approach (which involves 'wiffle
  ball' confinement) and so have not attempted pushing for break
  even energy production.The video was eye opening though, I had no
  idea that high temperature super conductors were set to
  revolutionize tokomaks. If the potential is there, it seems like
  the prudent thing to do would be to reset the ITER project, and
  redesign utilizing the current generation of high temperature
  super conductors. But I'm just an interested observer, what do I
  know?[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polywell
 
briankelly - 3 hours ago
From the actual journal article:> Two additional complications
arise because plasma fusion apparatuses are experimental and one-
of-a-kind. First, the goodness metric for plasma is not fully
established and objective: some amount of human judgement is
required to assess an experiment. Second, the boundaries of safe
operation are not fully understood: it would be easy for a fully-
automated optimisation algorithm to propose settings that would
damage the apparatus and set back progress by weeks or months.> To
increase the speed of learning and optimisation of plasma, we
developed the Optometrist Algorithm. Just as in a visit to an
optometrist, the algorithm offers a pair of choices to a human, and
asks which one is preferable. Given the choice, the algorithm
proceeds to offer another choice. While an optometrist asks a
patient to choose between lens prescriptions based on clarity, our
algorithm asks a human expert to choose between plasma settings
based on experimental outcomes. The Optometrist Algorithm attempts
to optimise a hidden utility model that the human experts may not
be able to express explicitly.I haven't read the full article nor
do I understand the problem space, but the novelty seems overstated
based on this. Maybe they can eventually collect metadata to
automate the human intuition.Edit: here's their formal description
of it: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06645-7/figures/2
 
  pm90 - 3 hours ago
  I mean, if it has not been done before, it doesn't look like
  they're overstating the novelty. Most algorithms look "obvious"
  in hindsight :).
 
    euyyn - 2 hours ago
    It's a well-known technique in the out-of-fashion world of
    knowledge-based systems: To create an expert system, your
    experts often won't be able to articulate their utility
    function, so you extract it by presenting them A/B choices.
 
  efm - 1 hours ago
  Hot or not, but for dynamical systems optimization.
 
  Kenji - 3 hours ago
  In software jargon, this is called a "Wizard" (i.e. installer
  wizard, calibration wizard, etc. that guide you through a process
  that is more complicated by asking a series of simple questions)
  and is an idea that dates back decades.
 
    Sniffnoy - 2 hours ago
    If I'm understanding this right, I'm pretty sure this is not in
    fact just a wizard.  It's using people's answers to "which of
    these is better" to learn an objective function that can later
    be used for optimization.  A wizard is just presenting explicit
    choices.  Making one requires knowing all the possible paths
    and results in advance.  You could I suppose have an "implicit
    wizard", where every choice was in terms of "Which of these two
    examples do you prefer?" rather than explicitly stating what
    the user was choosing between, but that would ultimately just
    be a more confusing version of an explicit wizard -- it would
    still require you to program in all the possible paths and
    results in advance.  That's much less interesting than this.
 
  [deleted]
 
  tuco86 - 2 hours ago
  i also haven't read the full article. I wondered if it was worth
  reading before i clicked the link really. How did they determine
  it whould be faster than.. what? doing it without computers? And
  if it cuts down months worth of computation to just some hours,
  can i expect a working fusion reactor in the next 1-2 years
  instead of 10-30? How did this become HN #1?
 
quickben - 3 hours ago
Outside of the title being misleading, I'm sceptical. It's one
thing to have the hardware for research, and completely other to
have the expertise for the research.Google entered the self driving
cars research, and we have yet to see them driven around.This
heavily reminds me of Intel and their diversification, up until
recently, they were in IoT, makers market and what not. One solid
push from AMD and they jumped out of everything way too fast to
track.Google seems the same with the nuclear fusion. They have the
advertising money to throw around, but that just it, they are in
different segment, and from investing side I'm more inclined to
stay away from their stock then buy it.
 
  whatrusmoking - 3 hours ago
  huh? https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/10/15609844/waymo-google-
  sel...https://www.slashgear.com/waymo-launches-early-rider-beta-
  pr...They're easily 5 years ahead of the competition.
 
  bllguo - 3 hours ago
  like the other comment, I don't see how your example of self-
  driving proves anything.In fact the more I think about it the
  more I'm confused by your comment. What are you skeptical about?
  Google here has demonstrated their computational resources can be
  of great benefit to scientific causes such as nuclear fusion. If
  you're saying that you're skeptical Google can do nuclear fusion,
  I think you're missing the point.
 
  sremani - 3 hours ago
  I do not think that is the case, Alphabet is structured in a way
  to have diverse interests pursued. Sure, competition to Google
  search will compel them to retrench but not throw away other
  organizations hosted in Alphabet domain, unlike Intel.
 
  The_Sponge - 3 hours ago
  >Google entered the self driving cars research, and we have yet
  to see them driven around.You see their working prototypes flying
  around mountain view all the time. And, they've been transparent
  with their progress.People have been working on this since the
  80s.
 
    jsmthrowaway - 3 hours ago
    Considering ?the whine of the electric motor in Waymo?s 25mph
    prototype is mildly annoying when my window is open and they
    drive by several times an hour? is a real thing in my own life
    as a resident of Mountain View, it?s odd to see the assertion
    that they don?t drive around.And I live on a side street.
 
EternalData - 3 hours ago
Google might try to become the conglomerate of all forward-facing
things but it is somewhat funny to see how through it all, it's
their advertising revenues that form the core of the business.
 
  sgt101 - 3 hours ago
  I think it's their compute capability and massive interaction
  with the concerns of humanity expressed via search; in the short
  term that's leveraged to create advertising revenue, in the
  longer term who knows?
 
  zitterbewegung - 3 hours ago
  This pattern happens more often than you think.Microsoft: They
  make an Operating System and Office Suite. From Microsoft
  Research they have labs on Quantum Computing, they have five
  Turing Award winners (One is Leslie Lamport) and he developed
  TLA+ while employed there.Facebook: A social network Funds a
  bunch of Deep Learning Research and NLP.Elon Musk: Helped create
  PayPal, now does electric cars and rockets, (Tesla,
  SpaceX)NVIDIA: Made graphics cards for video games. Now those
  same devices allow for deep learning.
 
    rgbrenner - 3 hours ago
    Odd to see microsoft in this list. They make money from a lot
    more than than just "an Operating System and Office Suite"
    (their #3 and #1 source of revenue respectively).What is odd
    about the #2 cloud computing company researching quantum
    computing?https://www.onmsft.com/wp-
    content/uploads/2016/08/msftproduc...And doesn't facebook use
    deep learning and NLP in their product? How is that similar to
    Google investing in self driving cars (for example)?
 
  beambot - 3 hours ago
  Why is that surprising?  Look at individuals... they work for
  money so that they can pursue their own ambitions.  It is rare to
  find an individual with the luxury of pursuing their own, exact
  ambitions to also earn money.Kudos for Google for using their
  vast funds to finance their ambitions rather than just hoarding
  it away.
 
  fishnchips - 3 hours ago
  Which is exactly what they're trying to change - both with
  "conventional" offerings like Android and Cloud, as well as with
  what they call "moonshots".
 
    [deleted]
 
  DanBC - 3 hours ago
  > it's their advertising revenues that form the core of the
  business.You'd think the advertising staff would get pretty good
  treatment at Google.Do they?
 
    euyyn - 2 hours ago
    Why wouldn't they? All Googlers get very very good treatment.
 
    dekhn - 1 hours ago
    when I worked in the ads part, it was not glamorous (as
    compared to search, or mobile, or social, or whatever the hot
    area was at the time) but I think we were treated well, and
    acknowledged for running a critical service that provided
    revenue that allowed other parts of the company to do research
    and development into new things.I can't speak for the entire
    advertising staff, of course.
 
MrQuincle - 3 hours ago
There are two directions within the energy world that I don't
completely get. One of them is hydrogen storage, the other nuclear
fusion.From what I always understood is that the high-energy
neutrons produced by the fusion reaction irradiate the surrounding
structure and that there is still considerable nuclear waste
(although lifetimes are better than with nuclear fission). Do the
scientists not care or is this outdated info?
 
  openasocket - 3 hours ago
  You're thinking of
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_activationYou need to use
  materials that stand up well to neutron bombardment. Many
  materials upon neutron capture have a half life measured in
  seconds, which isn't a big deal. As nuclear waste disposal goes,
  this really isn't a concern.
 
  pm90 - 3 hours ago
  The comparison is not b/w fusion and a hypothetical waste free
  source of energy. Its b/w fusion and fission. The waste products
  of fission are much more dangerous, expensive to handle and we
  still haven't found foolproof, effective ways of disposing
  them.OTOH, danger from irradiated materials (whatever that is,
  this is the first time I'm hearing this TBH) doesn't seem very
  pressing. I highly doubt any of the irradiated stuff would have a
  half life of millions of years.
 
    wbl - 2 hours ago
    Half life is inversely proportional to radiation intensity. The
    big issue with fission waste products are the nucleotides
    radioactive enough to kill and long lived enough to be
    annoying, not the nasty ones that go away in a few decades or
    the almost inert ones.
 
      xrange - 2 hours ago
      Might as well put a Wikipedia link here about the fission
      product isotopes and their half lives:https://en.wikipedia.or
      g/wiki/Nuclear_fission_product#Radioa...
 
  Symmetry - 2 hours ago
  The neutrons coming from the fusion reactor do have the potential
  to make the surrounding material radioactive.  But that depends
  on exactly what the surrounding material is, some elements will
  become dangerous when exposed to neutrons and some won't.  An
  important part of designing a fusion powerplant, and one of the
  reasons it is difficult, is that you have to make sure that the
  materials you use can safely handle the neutrons coming from the
  fusion reaction without transmuting into dangerously radioactive
  forms.This is in contrast to a fission reactor where the fuel
  itself turns into dangerously radioactive elements when exposed
  to neutrons.EDIT:  The exception is that fusion powerplant
  designers will want to surround the reactor with lithium in the
  hopes that it will absorb a neutron and turn into tritium.  The
  tritium is then carefully gathered because it forms the the fuel
  for the reactor and it's hard to get except in a nuclear reactor.
 
  DennisP - 2 hours ago
  I saw a presentation by the head of MIT's fusion department, in
  which he said that the waste would only need to be contained for
  several decades. It's very different from fission, where the fuel
  itself produces long-lived high level waste.With the reactor
  discussed in this article, the situation is even better, because
  it would use boron fusion. That reaction doesn't produce neutron
  radiation at all. There'd just be a tiny amount from side
  reactions.
 
siscia - 3 hours ago
I do have a naive question.Suppose a big breakthrough comes out of
a private company, and such innovation is necessary to use nuclear
fusion.The company will be free to do whatever it pleases with the
technology or it will somehow "force" to let other use, maybe
behind the payment of some royalties.
 
  crusso - 2 hours ago
  If they have a patentable breakthrough, they would be able to
  restrict use of their discovery for the duration of their patent.
 
  jccooper - 2 hours ago
  Patent law generally recognizes the option of the state to
  enforce compulsory licensing, though it's rarely exercised.
  Eminent domain may also be used to take patents.The modern
  approach seems to be to just let people find a way around the
  patent, or simply ignore and litigate.
 
  ekun - 1 hours ago
  It probably also depends on funding they have received from
  places like the Department of Energy and contracts they have
  signed for their research being publicly available, but if Paul
  Allen is the funding and not the government maybe it's all
  private. My own naivety would say billionaires investing in clean
  technology would share it with the world, but who knows?
 
  dekhn - 1 hours ago
  yep.  They could keep it a trade secret (no patent), patent it
  and not license it, or patent it and license it so others could
  use it under some terms.This only matters for the life of the
  patent, and is consistent with the intent of patents.
 
[deleted]
 
DrNuke - 3 hours ago
Diversification of the business, me thinks.., nuclear is so big
(but slow) that a penny invested today may become a tenner
tomorrow, just in case.
 
mtgx - 3 hours ago
I think their universal quantum computer (to be announced later
this year) could accelerate fusion research even more, as I imagine
it could more accurately simulate the atom reactions and
experiments on it. Practical quantum computers may just be what we
were missing to finally be able build working fusion reactors.The
millions of possible "solutions" and algorithms for working fusion
reactors may be what has made fusion research so expensive and
fusion reactors seem so far away. Quantum computers may be able to
cut right through that hard problem, although we may have to wait a
bit more until quantum computers are useful enough to make an
impact on fusion research. I don't know if that's reaching 1,000
qubits or 1 million qubits.
 
  _FKS_ - 1 hours ago
  Even if you had the computing power AND if you were simulating
  your fusion reactor's plasma in realtime, while it's running AND
  you know/can predict the plasma instabilities in realtime (under
  a few ms), you still need a way to "counter" those instabilites
  in the said plasma. And you need to counter fast, before the
  instability "poisons" the entire plasma, something that should
  happen within a few ms. If you don't, your entire experiment
  stops, and it takes a while to get it back (minutes). So it's not
  only about the computing power.