GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
SEC Issues Report Concluding DAO Tokens, a Digital Asset, Were
Securities
234 points by uptown
https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-131
___________________________________________________________________
 
m777z - 1 hours ago
I'm not terribly happy with the decision, though I can't say I'm
surprised. I enjoy the drama of the Wild West that is Ethereum and
the rest of the cryptocurrency ecosystem. Minimal regulation
encourages innovation, while regulated markets can exist for people
who want stability and certain guarantees to prevent fraud (or at
least make it difficult).I wonder what would happen if financial
regulations became more "optional". I.e. the SEC exists to provide
guarantees if a given company wanted to get the SEC's seal of
approval but does not enforce most regulations on entities that
don't seek SEC approval (and thus investors would know such
entities are riskier). I suppose eventually a "too big to fail"
company would avoid regulation and consequently go under, and that
would be the end of that.
 
  DennisP - 1 hours ago
  It might not change the overall ecosystem that much. Many
  companies doing ICOs are already locating themselves in
  friendlier jurisdictions, and making some effort to block U.S.
  contributors.
 
    joosters - 34 minutes ago
    What efforts are these? All I've seen are checkboxes on their
    web site making the user tick a box confirming that they aren't
    a US citizen.Geo-blocking US IP addresses won't work either,
    because an ethereum contract can't refuse a transaction based
    upon its source IP address (it doesn't know it). So if an ICO
    publishes their ethereum contract address online (e.g. via a
    twitter post), they are implicitly advertising to US investors.
 
    isubkhankulov - 1 hours ago
    securities laws apply based on the investor's jurisdiction
 
    brucephillips - 1 hours ago
    I imagine blocking U.S. contributors would significantly affect
    the ecosystem.
 
      DennisP - 1 hours ago
      They're already doing it. It's near impossible to do it
      effectively, if the contributor is comfortable interacting
      directly with smart contracts, but they're doing things like
      geoblocking their websites, making you click a box saying
      you're not in the U.S., etc.
 
      zazpowered - 1 hours ago
      Most ICOs already try to block US contributors but it's
      usually only based on IP which can easily be gamed
 
        brucephillips - 1 hours ago
        Interesting.  Do you know why they were doing this?  Just
        in anticipation that the SEC would crack down?
 
          zazpowered - 1 hours ago
          Yeah it seems like people already knew it was a gray area
          so they did it as a precaution. I don't think this SEC
          notice changes very much.
 
      cloakandswagger - 1 hours ago
      Status prohibited US citizens from participating in their ICO
      and they still raised $100M.Anyone tech savvy enough to
      contribute money to an ICO is tech savvy enough to connect to
      a non-US VPN before doing it.
 
        Dylan16807 - 40 minutes ago
        Good luck fending off the SEC with an argument about VPNs
        when you have millions of dollars of US citizen investment
        in your coffers.
 
  Cshelton - 1 hours ago
  The regulations put in place by the SEC are not to help
  companies, but to protect U.S. citizens from being scammed all
  the time.Sure, the wild west is fun, but if you are in an
  economic ecosystem where a large percentage is comprised of
  scammers/fraudulent companies, then it will be detrimental to
  long term success.
 
    m777z - 1 hours ago
    Which is why most publicly-traded companies would get the SEC
    seal of approval in my hypothetical scenario--institutional
    investors (which I think own most of the U.S. stock market)
    would demand it.
 
    Jabanga - 1 hours ago
    >but to protect U.S. citizens from being scammed all the
    time.US citizens shouldn't be treated like children that need
    to protected from their own stupidity.
 
      s73ver - 1 hours ago
      And companies shouldn't feel emboldened to scam left and
      right.
 
        Jabanga - 1 hours ago
        Of course. Anyone that scams should be punished. That does
        not require introducing a license for engaging in some
        consensual activity, and prosecuting anyone that does this
        activity without the license. This fearful attitude that
        will sacrifice the liberty for the promise of security will
        leave you with neither.
 
      Asdfbla - 18 minutes ago
      Extreme libertarian views like yours have been rejected
      almost everywhere in the world. Maybe it's your opinion that
      allowing scammers to manipulate people is their basic right,
      but no one seems to share that sentiment.
 
      isubkhankulov - 1 hours ago
      history has proven this sentiment wrong
 
        Jabanga - 1 hours ago
        This is not a sentiment that can be proven wrong. It's a
        statement on basic rights.And history shows that attempts
        to control complex industries with cookie cutter rules
        imposed from on top create the most dysfunctional
        industries in the economy, namely finance, pharmaceuticals,
        and healthcare.
 
          jnwatson - 1 hours ago
          Much like vaccines, meat inspection, and building codes,
          we've forgotten what it's like without them.  We (Great
          Britain and USA) have been making securities regulations
          for 400 years.The important lesson of securities
          regulation is that it helps the "good" guys more than it
          hurts the bad guys.When I buy 100 shares of PZZA, I want
          to be reasonably confident that Papa Johns is cooking
          pizza and not the books.  That confidence, or trust in
          the system, reduces friction that helps both buyers and
          sellers of securities.
 
          Jabanga - 58 minutes ago
          A case for mandatory vaccination can be made, as it
          addresses public health threats, which are negative
          externalities. Meat inspection cannot. You can choose to
          eat only government certified meat and not suffer any ill
          effects from non-certified meat being available on the
          market.Just because you want products certified by a
          government body to be safe doesn't mean you have a right
          to force others to live according to your standards.
 
          throwaway2048 - 30 minutes ago
          There is a massive negative externality for allowing
          scammers to run free in a situation where the upfront
          ability to assess fitness-of-goods is lacking.https://en.
          wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Market_for_Lemonsthe money quote
          being    The cost of dishonesty, therefore, lies not only
          in      the amount by which the purchaser is cheated; the
          cost also must include the loss incurred from
          driving legitimate business out of existence.
 
          dragonwriter - 50 minutes ago
          > A case for mandatory vaccination can be made, as it
          addresses public health threats, which are negative
          externalities. Meat inspection cannot.Meat inspection
          deals with a different failure of ideal markets than
          direct externalities, to wit, information asymmetry.
          However,the market inefficiency produced by information
          assymetry itself has negative externalities, so it's not
          unrelated.
 
      Cshelton - 1 hours ago
      Very smart people are scammed and conned all the time.
 
        Jabanga - 1 hours ago
        Of course. We don't restrict the rights of the entire
        population to engage in voluntary interactions to preempt
        crime. We punish actual criminals to deter other would-be
        criminals, and leave everyone else to be free.We don't
        require a publishing license because someone might use
        their right to free speech to libel someone else. We punish
        the libeler.
 
  PhasmaFelis - 1 hours ago
  > I enjoy the drama of the Wild West that is Ethereum and the
  rest of the cryptocurrency ecosystem."Drama" is not really a
  desirable characteristic for most users of a market.
 
    m777z - 1 hours ago
    Indeed, and yet the market cap of these cryptocurrencies has
    grown much faster than that of almost any company you could
    name over the last few years. (Yes, I know that's an apples-to-
    oranges comparison, but apparently a lot of people, myself not
    included, are willing to take the risk.)
 
    ddoolin - 1 hours ago
    I would say there's plenty of drama in already-regulated
    markets, wouldn't you? I think the OP simply meant this
    particular flavor of drama.
 
  s73ver - 1 hours ago
  Then almost no company would seek that "seal of approval", the
  regulations would be worthless, and just about every US Citizen
  would be worse off.
 
  matt4077 - 55 minutes ago
  I believe there are different tiers to some securities
  regulations, right? I seem to remember some sort of "professional
  investor" status you can apply for, that lets you participate in
  certain private offerings. And I believe the different
  marketplaces (NYSE, NASDAQ, etc) also differ in the requirements,
  although I guess these would come on top of common regulations
  required by the SEC.A fundamental problem with different tiers of
  regulation is that people tend to misjudge their competence. Look
  at the list of Madoff victims, or that congressman who got a
  bunch of his colleagues to buy his Australian healthcare micro-
  cap. And while it may feel almost like justice when a congressman
  fails in such a public and spectacular way, for everyone who
  deserves it, there will be thousands of people fleeced by corrupt
  "investment advisors" pushing scams onto unsuspecting
  victims.It's easy to say it's these people's fault, and
  "Americans shouldn't be treated like children". But that sort of
  just-punishment-for-stupidity rhetoric implies, under the most
  gracious interpretation, that people people are capable of
  learning, and that such scams would therefore only be a transient
  phenomenon. History shows pretty well that this is not the case:
  new stupid people are born every day.The less charitable
  interpretation is that there's just nothing wrong with exploiting
  peoples' stupidity to take their money. In that case, I wonder
  why this logic doesn't apply to physical capability as well: we
  don't need police, a real American can defend his property on his
  own. And if he's too old, or weak, or not organised enough to
  always have at least as many defenders around him than there are
  attackers, then he deserves a good beating...People tend to not
  enjoy living under such conditions, so they start outsourcing
  their protection, both physically and financially. It gives them
  peace of mind, and it's also extremely efficient in terms of
  economics: "Hey, why don't we get together, hire someone who
  specialises in understanding investment risk, and tells us if
  this company's CEO is actually a convicted felon who has already
  bought the one-way ticket to Bolivia."...and after a few rounds
  of professionalizing this concept, you end up with the
  SEC.There's also a fundamental misunderstanding of the term
  "risk" at play in these debates:There's the usual "risk" of
  investments that, in a functioning market, should be almost
  linearly (anti-)correlated with the potential reward. This is the
  risk that's meant in all those formulas.The risk of the Wild West
  is that you're falling for a scammer. This is a risk that behaves
  rather differently than the other risk.The first, good, reward-
  promising risk is what one might call the uncertainty of things
  you cannot (practically) know without trying: will people enjoy
  this movie, will these scientists come up with a drug that works.
  You can make educated guesses, and the market serves to
  incentives people to guess well, and therefore allocates money to
  the most worthy causes available. Importantly, regulations try to
  make all relevant information available to everyone, and the idea
  is that all that's left to do is having good intuition, and you
  may be better at that than all the investment banks combined.The
  second risk, that of falling for a sweet-buzzwording scammer, is
  a risk that only exists because you don't know all the relevant
  information. But that information exists, and others have it. In
  such a market, you're almost sure to lose your money, because it
  is possible to eliminate such risk if you have enough money to
  invest: Others, who have more resources than you, may just send
  somebody to the company's address and discover that the CEO has a
  face tattoo of a Swastika and has his grandmother generate random
  numbers by flipping coins.
 
  aqsheehy - 2 minutes ago
  It also encourages scams, and based on the ethereum world there's
  more scams than innovation
 
  xorcist - 1 hours ago
  There is no (useful) innovation in the ICO space. I would even
  want to argue that is makes a lot of innovation hard or
  impossible.
 
    Rmilb - 4 minutes ago
    What about dominant assurance contracts for funding public
    goods?
 
ilaksh - 1 hours ago
The SEC should show that it protects everyone's rights and not just
large firms with piles of cash to pay to them and to pay expensive
lawyers.  Otherwise we have to assume that this is largely about
trying to tax things.The way they can do this is by making a real
effort to update their technical, documentation, and regulatory
programs.Is there a straightforward way to do an Edgar filing that
doesn't require a bunch of training?  Is there a web page that
clearly lists the requirements for these types of securities in
plain English?How much do the company registrations and filings
actually cost?  What is the basis for these costs?  Because an ICO
can be created at no cost. Are the excessive fees due to a lack of
modernization or streamlining of the processes, or they simply
bribes that line officials' pockets and protect the incumbent firms
from poorly funded startups?In recent cases, how would fees and
filings have actually protected anyone?  Does the SEC have
technical staff or software capable of evaluating Ethereum
contracts for validity or safety?  If not, how does their
regulatory effort provide any benefit, except as an opportunity for
them to collect a type of tax and make it harder for startups to
compete with large firms where SEC officials have friends working?
 
  komali2 - 42 minutes ago
  I mean, this describes tax code and legislation in general. I'm
  hoping we can get text parsing models to the point that they can
  be utilized to simplify legal documents or even the entire US Tax
  Code. Like, Google Translate can translate Chinese to English
  decently, imagine if one day it could translate Legal Tax Code
  MumboJumbo to English as well? Or even cooler, if you could plug
  in your personal details (well, terrifying I guess) and it spits
  out all the loopholes you can exploit.EDIT: I guess services like
  H&R block tried to automate this, but I'm thinking less like "oh
  you donated x dollars, make sure to put that on your forms!" and
  more like "Hey, you live in x city, did you know if you move a
  mere x miles away you avoid city taxes for y, county taxes for z,
  and can put a moving bonus for moving n miles!" or even "You are
  x type of contractor, consider switching your status to y because
  you will get these real number tax benefits."
 
    djsumdog - 27 minutes ago
    The funny thing is, the IRS can already do this without any
    text parsing of legislation for domestic taxes. They have all
    the data and rule sets to completely automate the filing
    process.In Australia the government has official tax software.
    It pulls all your PAYG information and auto-fills most of what
    you need. In NZ, people don't file taxes at all. They login to
    the IRD website and their tax data is populated. You can accept
    what's presented or file for corrections.H&R Block and TurboTax
    actively lobby against the US IRS from creating the same type
    of filing system. Our entire banking system is 20 years behind
    the rest of the world:http://penguindreams.org/blog/the-
    american-banking-system-is...
 
      akira2501 - 6 minutes ago
      > They have all the data and rule sets to completely automate
      the filing process.My partner works in outside sales as an
      agent for a "Fortune 100" company,  and the IRS in no way has
      all the data to automate any part of her taxes.  From the way
      she's compensated,  to the reimbursements,  to the legitimate
      business expeses..  there's no way she'd get a good deal if
      she let the IRS guess at any of that.
 
        cbhl - 2 minutes ago
        Okay, but then there's the other XX% of Americans who only
        have W-2 income.
 
  josh2600 - 40 minutes ago
  Comments like this are ludicrous. Do you really think the SEC
  doesn't understand distributed ledgers or ethereum contracts?
  Second, do you think anyone has technical staff that are capable
  of writing safe contracts in Solidity (Parity wallet would
  suggest not...).In short, the idea that people must be
  incompetent because they're in the government is pretty
  ludicrous. The SEC is consistently one of the best technical
  organizations despite the fact everyone lobbies for them to have
  the fewest resources with which to do their job.If you think all
  ICOs pass the smell test, maybe you haven't been fleeced enough
  in your life to appreciate scams when you see them?Source: I run
  a crypto hedge fund and have spent a lot of time evaluating ICOs.
  Some of them are legitimate, philosophically sound ideas looking
  for funding and some of them are outright scams.
 
    brooklyntribe - 17 minutes ago
    Actually hung out with a JP Morgan Chase banker the other day.
    Big into crypto. He said the SEC had no clue what was going on.
    They leave at 5 PM, and head home to wife's and kids, and
    mortgages.While the "kids" are hacking, micro-dosing, and
    working 100 weeks. And they are all of 17.It's not in their
    world. A 55 year old banker is not hacking solidity contracts
    at 3 AM. No way.
 
      matthewmacleod - 12 minutes ago
      It's not in their world. A 55 year old banker is not hacking
      solidity contracts at 3 AM. No way.Fucking awesome. Nobody
      should be doing that.
 
      nkrisc - 12 minutes ago
      Given the source, I might take that with a grain of salt.
 
      LeifCarrotson - 10 minutes ago
      Being competent is not exclusive with leaving at 5pm, having
      a wife, kids, and a mortgage. Nor is being 17, micro-dosing
      on psychoactive drugs, working 100-hour weeks or hacking at
      3am.In fact, I would argue that the correlation swings in the
      opposite direction.
 
      scrumper - 10 minutes ago
      Because the 55 year old is too smart to! It's not like those
      "kids'" are doing anything good at 3am either; their work
      seems to be flaky and fraud-prone. See: the DAO hack and
      recent Ethereum smart contract thefts to name just a couple.
 
      consz - 8 minutes ago
      Why should one believe a 17 year old, working 100 hour weeks
      and micro-dosing (really, what does this have to do with
      anything?) knows or is more capable than a 55 year old?
 
      haldean - 7 minutes ago
      Ah, the classic SV "he or she has a real adult life, and thus
      cannot understand my h4xx0r skillz" chestnut.
 
    [deleted]
 
    FajitaNachos - 10 minutes ago
    Is your hedge fund registered with the SEC? What's the name of
    it? I've been thinking about crypto hedge funds lately and am
    genuinely curious.
 
      lstyls - 6 minutes ago
      From HN profile> General Partner, Crypto Lotus. >
      Cryptolotus.comFirst google result for "crypyolotus sec" is
      an apparent SEC filing: https://goo.gl/txKA3t
 
  KirinDave - 1 hours ago
  > Because an ICO can be created at no costExcept the cost to the
  participants who later have wasted money because the ICO contract
  was exploitable...At the current rate major losses are as
  perceptible as all successes. Maybe the industry needs some
  externally imposed speed bumps from SOME authority until folks
  can get their acts in gear?
 
    maneesh - 1 hours ago
    Can you show me the losses vs successes?
 
      KirinDave - 56 minutes ago
      I actually cannot name any successes, I looked for a few
      moments. I presume they exist.For those thinking I am glib
      and downvoting, I am asking: Do you know of any? I searched,
      asked some friends in etherium. I presume they must exist in
      some for as we're no longer early-days with Etherium.
 
    [deleted]
 
    Romanulus - 12 minutes ago
    ... and currency can be created at the cost of the future
    unborn generations.Your move, KirinDave.
 
    [deleted]
 
  JumpCrisscross - 56 minutes ago
  > the SEC should show that it protects everyone's rightsOne sure-
  fire way to get the SEC to go absolutely ballistic is to hurt
  mom-and-pop investors. This is why the commission was founded [1]
  and why securities law maintains "accredited investor"
  thresholds, controversial as they are.> Is there a
  straightforward way to do an Edgar filing that doesn't require a
  bunch of training?Securities lawyers are a few thousand dollars
  well spent. That said, the SEC has online self-help resources [2]
  and an online filing portal [3].> How much do the company
  registrations and filings actually cost?It depends on how much
  you raise. Right now it's 0.01159% [4].> an ICO can be created at
  no costUntil shit hits the fan. Then everyone needs to hire a
  lawyer. An SEC complaint, on the other hand, triggers
  investigations and potentially enforcement actions paid for by
  the filing fees, amongst other things. It's a public good that
  helps keep companies honest.> how would fees and filings have
  actually protected anyone?The SEC is constantly litigating [5],
  launching proceedings [6] and helping resolve failed companies
  [7] on behalf of investors. Audit requirements stop lots of crap
  before they get too serious, too.> Does the SEC have technical
  staff or software capable of evaluating Ethereum contracts for
  validity or safety?The SEC doesn't evaluate filings for fitness,
  just completeness. Its mantra is disclosure and transparency.
  That lets investors come up with their own informed conclusions.
  Especially small ones who can't afford corporate lawyers to pull
  managers' teeth.[1] http://www.columbia.edu/~hcs14/SEC.htm[2]
  https://www.sec.gov/info/edgar/guidance[3] https://www.filermanag
  ement.edgarfiling.sec.gov/Welcome/EDGA...[4]
  https://www.sec.gov/ofm/Article/feeamt.html[5]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/litreleases.shtml[6]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin.shtml[7]
  https://www.sec.gov/divisions/enforce/receiverships.htm
 
    smokeyj - 8 minutes ago
    Why shouldn't mom-and-pop get the choice to invest in SEC
    regulated companies? If you like what the SEC has to offer, you
    can keep it. Taking away that choice seems paternalistic at
    best, corrupt at worst.
 
JohnJamesRambo - 1 hours ago
This is wonderful news.  The ICO world was a disgusting mess of
ignorance and pyramid schemes.
 
bitmapbrother - 1 hours ago
I was watching a YouTube video of a popular Ethereum blogger and he
mentioned that one of his acquaintances was charged with tax
evasion for not reporting his cryptocurrency income. This person
thought he could just pay what he owed and be done with it.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work like that. Once they catch you for
tax evasion you'll pay whatever you owe in addition to facing tax
evasion charges.
 
[deleted]
 
hellbanner - 1 hours ago
In another thread commenters speculated that ICO hacks were coming
from inside jobs.. does this new SEC report change how the
government would handle that? Is fraud of securities different from
fraud over imaginary coins now?
 
  isubkhankulov - 1 hours ago
  securities are property and property theft is a crime. even
  before this ruling, coins were treated as property.
 
  vkou - 1 hours ago
  Fraud is fraud, regardless of whether or not you're stealing
  securities, magical internet money, or baseball cards.
 
    [deleted]
 
    ceejayoz - 1 hours ago
    Certain types of fraud are still likely to garner more
    attention, particularly when there's a dedicated law
    enforcement organization tasked with it.
 
[deleted]
 
williamle8300 - 22 minutes ago
You can't change the thirst for freedom inborne in every man via
laws. This will only make cryptocurrency slip more easily through
their fingers and galvanize efforts to avoid oversight.
 
discombobulate - 1 hours ago
Removed. I'm not from the US.
 
  vasilipupkin - 1 hours ago
  I am not sure how that exempts anyone from anything.  If you, as
  a Swiss company, issue tokens that are securities according to
  country X and sell them to citizens of country X without going
  through a securities offering, you are violating that country's
  securities laws and the fact that you are based in Switzerland I
  don't think is relevant
 
    [deleted]
 
    [deleted]
 
prgmatic - 12 minutes ago
What does this mean if you've bought or sold cryptocurrency within
2017?
 
EGreg - 1 hours ago
This is a serious question to the lawyers on HN. In your non-advice
way, can you tell us your opinion on the following?So given that
now we have a serious precedent for considering all ICOs aa
securities, what are the steps a company needs to take to make sure
their ICO is legal under US LAW??1. Does it need to register the
ICO somehow? If so, how exactly are the securities
registered?2.!What regulations apply now? Do the 1933 blue sky laws
apply and Regulation D and the usual exceptions - including JOBS
act crowdfunding provisions - apply?3. Can anyone buy the ICO or
does the company now need a private placement memorandum?4. And
even so, isn't the secondary market for the tokens constitute
"transferring" of securities? What does a company need to make sure
all that is legal, short of fulfilling all the reporting
requirements of a Public company?Basically what happens now to all
the ICOs done so far by companies like Brave? What are they going
to do?Look at the title of this article and tell me - is it
accurate?https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurashin/2017/05/18/want-to-
ho...
 
joeyspn - 2 hours ago
BOOM! the game just changed...> In light of the facts and
circumstances, the agency has decided not to bring charges in this
instance, or make findings of violations in the Report, but rather
to caution the industry and market participants: the federal
securities laws apply to those who offer and sell securities in the
United States, regardless whether the issuing entity is a
traditional company or a decentralized autonomous organization,
regardless whether those securities are purchased using U.S.
dollars or virtual currencies, and regardless whether they are
distributed in certificated form or through distributed ledger
technology.
 
  smokeyj - 1 hours ago
  This literally changes nothing. Regulated companies already knew
  what the findings would be. Unregulated companies still don't
  care.
 
    brucephillips - 1 hours ago
    What is an "unregulated company"?
 
      pishpash - 1 hours ago
      There are unregulated exchanges, usually small.
 
      empath75 - 1 hours ago
      Criminal enterprises.
 
        brucephillips - 1 hours ago
        Which are still regulated.  They just flout the
        regulations.
 
    binarymax - 1 hours ago
    This changes lots of things.  You can't just open an
    DAO/ETH/BTC exchange, you need to be compliant with securities
    law and regulation.  Those who operate as an exchange now but
    do not file the proper paperwork (which is expensive) should
    expect audits, fines, and shutdown.
 
      brucephillips - 1 hours ago
      I don't think the findings unequivocally imply that ETH and
      BTC are securities.  Or am I missing something?
 
        wmf - 7 minutes ago
        AFAIK the SEC considers BTC a commodity but that doesn't
        mean it's unregulated. CFTC, IRS, FinCEN, and state
        regulations impose all kinds of restrictions on
        cryptocurrency that almost no companies are following.
 
        tannhauser23 - 56 minutes ago
        It's saying that companies raising money through ICOs are
        issuing securities in form of ownership tokens in their
        companies.
 
          brucephillips - 40 minutes ago
          No, it's specifically referencing "DAO" tokens, which are
          a subset of tokens sold through ICOs.
 
      oneplane - 1 hours ago
      No, they don't. That organisation only works in the USA, they
      can't do anything for 'the world'.Let me clarify this: Just
      because the US SEC wants something doesn't make it happen on
      the internet. They can do things with governments and
      companies, and that's about it.If some random hacker in
      Ukraine decides to use a ETH or BTC or smart contract or
      create a new coin, the SEC isn't going to be able to
      influence that. There is no point of control there.
 
        krschultz - 1 hours ago
        Good luck building the "economy of the future" without the
        US banking system. There is a reason banking sanctions are
        the US's most powerful non-military diplomatic tool.
 
    JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
    > Unregulated companies still don't careIf a company makes a
    mistake, the SEC first goes after the company. "Unregulated
    company" sounds like "no company" [1]. In that case, the SEC
    goes straight after the individuals involved.[1] Do you mean
    unregulated or unregistered? Unregulated means sole
    proprietorship. Unregistered could be an LLC or corporation
    that just never filed anything with the SEC.
 
    amluto - 1 hours ago
    What is an "unregulated company"?  A bunch of geeks in a US
    basement could get prosecuted.  A bunch of geeks in a non-US
    basement illegally selling unregistered securities to US
    persons might, too.  And, if they did it personally instead of
    through a limited liability company of some sort, and they are
    found liable for their investors' losses, that will be a
    personal liability.
 
  Animats - 1 hours ago
  Yes. The SEC is indicating that they're not going to apply this
  retroactively. Any upcoming Initial Coin Offering to US persons,
  though, is in trouble. Like all the ones listed here.[1][1]
  https://www.icoalert.com/
 
    modeless - 1 hours ago
    I would not count on them not applying this retroactively. The
    DAO is safe (along with Bitcoin and Ethereum themselves) but
    everyone else is not. I've heard interviews with some ICO
    people and it's clear that they know what they're doing is
    legally questionable. They're doing it anyway because of the
    obscene amount of money on the table. The SEC will not look
    kindly on these people.
 
      hudon - 6 minutes ago
      Are we sure Ethereum is safe? Bitcoin never did a premined
      token sale but the Ethereum Foundation did, so it looks much
      more like theDAO than Bitcoin does.
 
    vasilipupkin - 1 hours ago
    it's not just US persons.  Germany has securities laws, France
    has securities laws, etc. I mean that German equivalent of SEC
    can go after those selling securities to Germans without
    following German securities laws
 
      EGreg - 1 hours ago
      Serious question: Do you know any countries AT ALL that have
      no securities commission, or one that doesn't strictly
      regulate sale of securities, while at the same time the
      country allows formation of a company?Being that token sales
      are international, it would seem there is absolutely nothing
      illegal about opening a company in that country and offering
      securities. Even if the owners of the company are US
      citizens. Then you have the company pay YOUR company as its
      main supplier, as opposed to its parent.Is anyone on HN
      familiar with such a country?
 
        joeyspn - 1 hours ago
        > or one that doesn't strictly regulate sale of
        securitiesThere's a reason why some crypto-companies (and
        not crypto actually) are based in the Cayman Islands
        (BitMEX), British Virgin Islands (Bitfinex), etc... but
        Crypto Valley in Switzerland is gaining momentum as the
        leader.https://cryptovalley.swiss/BTW, Fred Wilson wrote an
        interesting piece about this
        recently:http://avc.com/2017/07/jurisdictional-competition/
 
          EGreg - 1 hours ago
          But can't their securities commission also pass such a
          resolution?
 
          vasilipupkin - 1 hours ago
          No, the issue is that it doesn't matter where you are
          based, if you offer securities to US persons, you have to
          abide by US securities laws.  If you offer securities to
          Germans, you have to abide by German laws.
 
          EGreg - 1 hours ago
          I an not sure that is binding on the company. Can you
          find a source for it in US securities law or SEC memo?
 
          vasilipupkin - 49 minutes ago
          https://www.sec.gov/about/offices/oia/oia_crossborder.sht
          ml
 
        Animats - 1 hours ago
        Israel does not regulate sales of securities to non-
        Israelis. This resulted in a huge binary option scam
        industry based out of Tel Aviv.[1] It got so big that it
        was 40% of Israel's financial sector.  It became a
        political embarrassment for Israel. "Because this industry
        gives Israel such a bad name and inflames anti-Semitism, we
        must uproot the phenomenon." - Israel's top securities
        regulator. A law change is coming, and most of the binary
        options operators have already fled elsewhere.  Cyprus and
        Bulgaria are popular.[1] http://www.timesofisrael.com/topic
        /binary-options/
 
          EGreg - 1 hours ago
          Can you elaborate on the details of these laws?For
          example can Israel's Securities Authority retroactively
          go after companies by classifying ICOs as securities? Or
          in this case, ALL securities can still currently be sold
          by Israeli companies to foreigners?Also, what are the
          rules for Cyprus and Bulgaria? Where do you get the
          information about their popularity and their applicable
          securities laws?
 
          Animats - 40 minutes ago
          No, but if you want, I can refer you to a good securities
          lawyer at Wilson Sonsini.
 
        Veratyr - 1 hours ago
        > Being that token sales are international, it would seem
        there is absolutely nothing illegal about opening a company
        in that country and offering securities. Even if the owners
        of the company are US citizens.Actually the US regulates
        companies that so much as offer securities to US citizens.
        Try getting an account with a forex broker that's based
        outside the US and you'll see what I mean. The CFTC doesn't
        limit itself to US companies.I haven't seen the same
        attempts being made on other kinds of securities but the
        framework is clearly there as the CFTC is using it.
 
  lossolo - 1 hours ago
  This changes nothing to most of the ICOs, most of them have
  information that they do not offer their tokens to US citizens.
 
    joosters - 43 minutes ago
    Are they obliged to check this, though? The only checks I've
    ever seen are making investors tick a box on a webpage to
    confirm that they aren't a US citizen. Is that good enough, or
    are these ICOs expected to do more thorough checking?Some ICOs
    have advertised their sales in the US, I wonder if the SEC will
    look on that as offering their tokens to US citizens, whatever
    the wording they put on their websites?
 
      clarky07 - 32 minutes ago
      Most that I've seen also don't allow US IP addresses.
 
m1k32h07 - 55 minutes ago
Why isn't etherium's price crashing right now?
https://ethereumprice.org/
 
  [deleted]
 
  matthewbauer - 46 minutes ago
  The sad thing is markets aren't rational at the end of the day.
 
[deleted]
 
robbiet480 - 2 hours ago
This appears to only applies to ICOs that offer something that is
like a security, such as the DAO, not voucher based ICOs like
Primalbase or StorjEDIT: Added appears to since IANAL
 
  Animats - 1 hours ago
  Assuming that would be unwise. In general, US securities laws
  cover anything that looks or works something like a security.
  There have been clever attempts to get around this before. They
  didn't work.[1][1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEC_v._W._J._Howey_Co.
 
    darawk - 1 hours ago
    You're right, but in the case of things like Storj and Sia, for
    instance, the ICO token is used to pay for the services offered
    by the network. What it really is, is a tradable pre-sale. It's
    as if you could trade the perks offered by a Kickstarter. I'm
    not sure if that would make it exempt or not, but it is an
    interesting legal question.
 
      xorcist - 1 hours ago
      How much paid use does Stork or Sia have? Very few, if any,
      have bought into these tokens to use the underlying service.
      It's mostly "expectations of future profit", especially
      considering many of these tokens is described as having no
      use. The idea seems to be that useless tokens can not be
      considered securities, which seems as likely as a cop must
      answer truthfully if he is a cop.
 
        mahyarm - 58 minutes ago
        Tickets to concerts, airpods, condos in london and tulips
        are subject to scalping and trading over MSRP. So even
        though people are trading service vouchers or physical
        objects, they are not a security just because a market has
        developed over their trade, speculative or not.
 
        darawk - 53 minutes ago
        Ya, I would expect the SEC to take that position. But it
        seems like a subtle legal question, that has the potential
        to turn all kinds of clearly non-security products into
        'securities' in the eyes of the law. Does standing in line
        to buy iphones on the day of release so you can sell them
        on eBay constitute buying a security? What about Air
        Jordans? Etc...At some point, the definition broadens to
        any purchase with the expectation of profitable resale,
        which is quite broad indeed. I don't think any court would
        allow such a broad interpretation of the SEC's power.
 
      [deleted]
 
      wmf - 3 minutes ago
      the ICO token is used to pay for the services offered by the
      network.And the ICO token is also used (and sometimes
      explicitly advertised) for investment as well. Uh oh.
 
  brucephillips - 1 hours ago
  It does seem to be ambiguous.  If you read the qualifications in
  section III:
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/investreport/34-81207.pdf, they
  seem to apply to voucher tokens as well.  Especially "A
  reasonable expectation of profit".
 
    ThrustVectoring - 1 hours ago
    If Valve decided to fund the creation of Team Fortress 3 in
    part with exclusive pre-order hats, would that now violate
    securities law?
 
      brucephillips - 39 minutes ago
      Read the rest of the conversation before you comment.  It's
      already been answered why pre-orders aren't securities.
 
    josaka - 1 hours ago
    This seems like an important distinction, i.e., between an
    ownership token and a "voucher token," assuming the latter is a
    token that gives the holder the right to some service.  Curious
    how a groupon isn't a security if a voucher token is.
 
      Animats - 43 minutes ago
      The Howey test for "is it a security?"* an investment of
      money has been made,* in a common enterprise and* the
      investor  has  the  expectation  of profits,  which profits
      are  expected to arise solely, or substantially, from the
      efforts of the promoter or third party.[1]That pretty much
      covers all "make money fast" schemes.[1] https://www.american
      bar.org/content/dam/aba/publications/blt...
 
      brucephillips - 1 hours ago
      A groupon doesn't appreciate when the company succeeds.
 
        josaka - 1 hours ago
        Maybe a better example would be a concert ticket, beanie
        babies, or baseball cards.
 
  Kiro - 1 hours ago
  Care to elaborate? What's the difference?
 
    laser - 58 minutes ago
    IANAL, but a security is profit-sharing/right to $-related
    things, like stocks and bonds. Tokens that are used to make
    purchases within applications/networks are not securities, for
    example in the Storj example above, tokens are bought to
    purchase storage, and there's no implication of organization
    profit-sharing or appreciation of value, etc. While some people
    may speculate on the growth of the network and purchase such
    tokens, their purpose is to purchase storage capacity from the
    network.
 
      brucephillips - 34 minutes ago
      > and there's no implication of organization profit-sharing
      or appreciation of value, etc.There is.  These tokens are
      explicitly marketed on that basis.
 
mrmcd - 1 minutes ago
The amount of delusion and denial in this thread is kind of
hilarious. US securities laws aren't suspended because you
sprinkled a bunch of magic libertarian crypto dust on everything.
 
dmitrygr - 1 hours ago
Good. This should help bring some sanity and accountability. they
were both quite needed
 
  oneplane - 1 hours ago
  Why? Nobody is forcing crypto currenency on anyone. I get that
  registered companies might have some other deal with the
  govenment and with hacker organisations, but a free and open (and
  non-country-bound) system should really not be 'managed' by some
  random organisation in a random country.
 
    tptacek - 1 hours ago
    Is there some way we can just replace these kinds of threads
    with a link to some canonical thread about why the concept of
    security laws is fundamentally unjust or unwise? This
    discussion really has nothing to do with the topic at hand.
 
      SolarNet - 1 hours ago
      Because not everyone agrees with you?
 
        tptacek - 1 hours ago
        That's an answer to someone's question, but a non-sequitur
        answer to mine.
 
          SolarNet - 1 hours ago
          > with a link to some canonical thread about why the
          concept of security laws is fundamentally unjust or
          unwiseBecause not everyone agrees with that position.
 
          tedunangst - 20 minutes ago
          I suspect tptacek is aware that not everyone thinks
          security laws are fundamentally unjust.
 
          tptacek - 1 hours ago
          You're still not there yet. Replace "canonical thread
          about" with "link to a debate about".
 
        kasey_junk - 1 hours ago
        He's suggesting that arguing whether SEC law being
        just/constitutional/what have you.  Regardless of your
        position, is largely off topic for these posts.It would be
        better to just link to the argument somewhere else than
        derailing this one.
 
          SolarNet - 1 hours ago
          Except he implied that the link should have a significant
          bias. Also there is a collapse button.
 
          tptacek - 1 hours ago
          It should auto-collapse threads like the one upthread
          about whether the SEC is fundamentally unjust.
 
    SolarNet - 1 hours ago
    The SEC exists to prevent fraud. It's about people having a
    choice between truthful investments. These companies are
    allowed to operate as they claim they are with relatively
    little oversight. What the SEC regulates is a company claiming
    they will use investment to do X and then the company does Y or
    keeps it for themselves. Which is also known as fraud. Like the
    DEA (an example of something unjust), Secret Service, and ATF,
    the SEC is a specialized branch of law enforcement.What these
    personal choice fundamentalists forget is that lying is wrong.
    And when you lie about what you are going to do with someone's
    money, that's a form of theft, e.g. fraud.
 
    [deleted]
 
    dmitrygr - 1 hours ago
    Same reason SEC exists. Because many people are easy to
    manipulate, and plenty of malicious people out there will
    convince (not force) them to invest in their ICO, etc.
 
      darawk - 1 hours ago
      Trying to protect everyone all the time from everything
      quashes innovation. I've lost money in ICOs. I lost money in
      the DAO, too. I'd lose that money 10x over again to prevent
      the SEC from squashing this nascent space like this.
 
      Jabanga - 1 hours ago
      Then we should limit who people can vote for, since voters
      are so easy to manipulate into voting against their own
      interests. The basic principles of liberal democracy assume
      that a person has an absolute right to make decisions for
      their own life. These kinds of restrictions are
      unconscionable restrictions on the right of free people to
      their personal autonomy.
 
        cheetos - 1 hours ago
        There is simply a massive difference between the theory of
        democracy and its actual implementation. Your personal
        autonomy is restricted by the government, massively,
        period, generally for everyone's own good. They decide what
        and how much medicine you can put in your body. Whether you
        can gamble, and where, and on what, and how much. What
        drugs you can take. What speed you can drive. Whether you
        must go to school or not based on your age. Which food you
        can buy at the supermarket. What you are allowed to see on
        television. Where and when you may protest. What behavior
        is allowed in public and what is not. What speech is
        considered 'free' and what isn't. What machines you may
        operate and under what circumstances. Which financial
        transactions you may or may not participate in and the
        terms of those transactions. The type of home you build and
        it's specifications. Which countries you may or may not
        enter and under which circumstances. Whether you are
        allowed to work or not. It's just the way things are.
 
          Jabanga - 1 hours ago
          >Your personal autonomy is restricted by the government,
          massively, period, generally for everyone's own good.
          They decide what and how much medicine you can put in
          your body. Whether you can gamble, and where, and on
          what, and how much. What drugs you can take. What speed
          you can drive. Whether you must go to school or not based
          on your age. Which food you can buy at the
          supermarket.These restrictions violate people's basic
          rights and are to the material detriment of society at
          large. The more of a regulatory burden is placed on an
          industry, the more dysfunctional, bureaucratic and
          nepotistic it is.
 
          jpetso - 15 minutes ago
          Basic rights are defined by various charters,
          constitutions, international agreements, and that's about
          it. If you find that one of those restrictions
          contradicts the ones applicable to your country and legal
          system, you have a good shot at changing it. (Point in
          case: gay marriage, and other Supreme Court rulings.)As
          for all other rights, those are determined by the
          government that is democratically voted in. If most
          people, via their elected representatives, decide that
          you shouldn't be allowed to speed, or smoke crack, and
          it's not constitutionally guaranteed, then it's not a
          basic right and it's not your right at all. Maybe moral
          right, but that depends on highly subjective morals and
          might therefore still get you into legal trouble.Best
          course of action is probably to find a country with a
          legal framework that matches your morals. If there's no
          such country, perhaps the time for these ideas hasn't
          come and you want to lobby for them to be recognized as
          basic rights, since right now they're obviously not.
 
          cheetos - 1 hours ago
          I truly hope that human drivers' "right" to drive at
          whatever speed they want is forever trampled by
          regulatory burden.
 
          Jabanga - 54 minutes ago
          You do not have a right to speed on public property
          because others share ownership in it, and thus have a
          legitimate right to contribute to the rules that govern
          its use. If you owned your own private track, you would
          have such a right.
 
          brett40324 - 1 minutes ago
          I second "thats just the way things are".
 
        vkou - 1 hours ago
        We aren't allowed to murder people either, but for some
        reason, most of us don't consider that to be the antithesis
        of liberal democracy.
 
          Jabanga - 1 hours ago
          The basic principle of liberal democracy is that we have
          an absolute right to personal autonomy unless we violate
          other people's equal right to the same.Making it illegal
          to offer a digital token for sale to other consenting
          adults, without approval from a central authority, is
          unconscionable.Before endorsing yet another law that
          restricts our right to engage in voluntary interactions,
          consider this: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archi
          ve/2016/06/enforci...
 
          chowells - 1 hours ago
          You interfere with my right to personal autonomy by
          bankrupting yourself throwing good money after bad in
          stupid investments, leaving yourself destitute and in
          need of additional public services.Or do you also intend
          to claim that the poor should be allowed to die on the
          streets as punishment for not being rich?
 
          Jabanga - 1 hours ago
          No one has a right to force you to support someone who
          made themselves destitute. You're using one infringement
          of personal autonomy to justify another.
 
          [deleted]
 
      subverter - 1 hours ago
      Should not the individual be held responsible for making a
      poor decision? Taking the stance that we should be protected
      from every possible bad thing that can happen is a recipe for
      economic disaster. Especially when the one offering such
      protection is the one that manipulates us the most.
 
  armenarmen - 1 hours ago
  There's no room for buyer beware? I mean c'mon. People
  participating in ICOs are still pretty sophisticated technically.
  Seems like we're regulating interactions between well informed
  consenting adults.
 
    xorcist - 1 hours ago
    Every one of these scams that have imploded, including the DAO
    itself, have had participants crying out for interventions.
    That should speak volumes about the amount of consent involved
    (and indeed the sophistication).
 
      maneesh - 54 minutes ago
      Citations? I know of maybe 5-10 coins that have been hacked
      or imploded in a fraudulent way due to the intrinsic nature
      of the coin, out of thousands created
 
    vkou - 1 hours ago
    How familiar are you with the history of securities laws? Do
    you know why they were drafted?Every con artist in history has
    claimed that their mark knew what they were getting into.
 
      armenarmen - 1 hours ago
      DAOs and the JOBS act for sure open up opportunities for
      crooks to do some "boiler-maker-esque" stuff. I cannot
      disagree with that. And I do not doubt that gullible people
      can be hoodwinked by bad people.  I would say that fraud and
      property theft can be handled on a case by case basis. That
      protecting hypothetical gullible crypto enthusiasts at the
      expense of the entire industry and putting up huge legal
      barriers to entry is the wrong move.
 
Cshelton - 1 hours ago
There was no doubt in my mind this was coming.Still waiting for
them to come down hard on a company as an example. In this article
it says they won't bring charges in this instance, meaning The DAO,
however; if you have taken part in an unregistered sale of
securities recently as a U.S. "company", you may want to seek legal
advice on how to proceed right away. Maybe a deal can be made with
the SEC for "ICO"'s that have occurred recently. Or you may be
advised to leave the U.S., which may be the best option.
 
  JumpCrisscross - 42 minutes ago
  > Or you may be advised to leave the U.S., which may be the best
  optionIf you were in the United States and/or sold securities to
  an American investor, the deed is done. Skipping town to avoid
  the SEC only serves to turn your potential civil liability into a
  foreign fugitive case.
 
kensai - 1 hours ago
Look at the beating the market gets right now (as of 13 minutes
after the news were posted).https://coinmarketcap.com
 
  lgierth - 1 hours ago
  It looks more like the various coins have been going down all day
  today?
 
  Cshelton - 1 hours ago
  To be fair, the market was down around that much today already.
  The SEC article has had little to no effect as of yet.I also
  don't see it having much effect at all as all of those tokens are
  traded in secondary markets.
 
    jandrese - 1 hours ago
    Or everybody who mattered already knew what was going to happen
    from their insider sources and were trading in advance of the
    announcement.
 
      Cshelton - 1 hours ago
      I would consider holders of most tokens to be "dumb money"...
      they did not have an inside source to the SEC release...
 
      JumpCrisscross - 11 minutes ago
      Insider trading applies to securities. Trading something on
      the inside knowledge that it is about to become a security,
      and thus come under the explicit purview of insider-trading
      rules, wins the Darwin Award for securities fraud.
 
    cjbprime - 1 hours ago
    Is selling an unregistered security on secondary markets more
    legal, or just less likely to be noticed?
 
  jhildings - 1 hours ago
  Not really, this has nothing to do with ICOs but Bitcoin fork
  drama and BCC
 
  artursapek - 1 hours ago
  Bitcoin and others are actually up if you look at a high
  resolution chart: https://cryptowat.ch/bitfinex/btcusd/1m
 
iMuzz - 1 hours ago
> The SEC's Report of Investigation found that tokens offered and
sold by a "virtual" organization known as "The DAO" were securities
and therefore subject to the federal securities laws. The Report
confirms that issuers of distributed ledger or blockchain
technology-based securities must register offers and sales of such
securities unless a valid exemption applies.> The agency has
decided not to bring charges in this instance, or make findings of
violations in the ReportSo they aren't going to bring charged to
the creators of The Dao. What about the other dApp's based in the
US that have already ICO'd (BAT, Augur etc.)? Also, if a company
successfully files/gets approved by the SEC, does that mean that
NASDAQ can now list tokens?AFAIK the SEC only cares about
securities sold in the U.S. I'd imagine this incentivizes a lot of
Token issuers to leave the U.S?
 
  Cshelton - 1 hours ago
  The SEC cares about U.S. citizens. If you marketed and/or sold to
  a U.S. investor, you are now under the SEC's jurisdiction.There
  are countries you can go to of course, but not many left. Grand
  Caymans... Switzerland is no longer a safe haven from U.S.
  jurisdiction either.
 
    [deleted]
 
    JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
    > The SEC cares about U.S. citizensResidents. Noncitizen
    American residents are protected by the SEC. Though even that
    is a leaky boundary [1].[1]
    http://clsbluesky.law.columbia.edu/2017/04/11/proskauer-
    rose...Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal
    advice. Do not take legal advice from my Internet comments.
 
  JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
  > AFAIK the SEC only cares about securities sold in the U.S.Or to
  American residents. The Treasury also claims jurisdiction over
  securities transactions done overseas using U.S. dollars.