GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-24) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
OpenMoko: 10 Years After
139 points by Kostic
http://www.vanille.de/openmoko-10-years-after-mickeys-story/
ngopher.com
___________________________________________________________________
 
rosser - 6 hours ago
I still have my Freerunner in a box somewhere. So much promise...I
keep wondering if there's something I could do with it. At this
point, though, it's probably more a historical footnote than
anything.
 
DanBC - 6 hours ago
Here's a small discussion from 10 years ago:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14388
 
  [deleted]
 
acidtrucks - 3 hours ago
I've always wanted to run openmoko.  If I could run it on modern
phones and replace android, I totally would.
 
msla - 6 hours ago
Since the main page is a bit slow, here's a
mirror:https://archive.is/8wYHe
 
sargun - 3 hours ago
OpenMoko holds a special place in my heart. It was the first
project that I contributed to in any meaningful fashion. I wrote a
couple patches to the Python implementation of FSO. It taught me a
ton about how GSM, embedded devices, and power saving worked. I
used it as an IoT device, long before IoT was a common thing.Not
many people know this, but OpenMoko was largely rolled by Dash
Navigation -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Openmoko#Dash_Express.
This gave Sean and Co. the cash and ability to develop the
OpenMoko, but unfortunately, Dash failed, because as a CNAV device,
it was too little, too late as compared to the ultra-converged cell
phone. I wish that they would have found other entities to back the
project, but the market just wasn't there yet.
 
lamby - 4 hours ago
Ah, nostalgia. I remember attending a big OpenMoko announcement as
FOSDEM. Naturally, it being FOSDEM, it was allocated a tiny room
which was completely and utterly packed. g
 
phaedrus - 4 hours ago
I bought a Neo Freerunner when it came out.  I tried make it my
daily phone, and invested a lot of time hacking on it - in the end
a wasted effort.  There were show-stopper bugs and face-palm-worthy
design missteps at every level of the stack.Its developer community
was fragmented among a half-dozen different distros from birth;
Openmoko themselves forked their own distro so that even if you
wanted to run the "official" one, you had two incompatible choices
- and neither the two "official" distros, nor any of the user-
developed ones, supported all of the hardware + apps necessary to
actually use this thing as a phone.  (I.e. one might have audio but
not support making calls; another might support making calls but no
audio volume; a third might lose all your contacts, etc.)  If we
could have taken the union of features from all these distros, it
could have had a great smartphone OS; that just goes to show what
gratuitous fragmentation cost us.As for hardware, we were screwed
from both sides by the hardware companies (flaky drivers) and
Openmoko's own circuit design.  Due to driver/card incompatibility,
I never found a high capacity SD card which would work completely
reliably in the phone; only the cramped 512MB SD card which came
with the phone worked reliably.  Mind you most of the time the
problem would show up after you spent a few hours compiling &
setting up Gentoo or whatever on a new 8GB SD card only to have the
3rd boot fail with a corrupted card.And in the circuit design side,
from the specific problems the phone's board had, I get the feeling
Openmoko's engineers were computer engineers but not very
knowledgeable in audio electronics.  They failed to properly
separate and route the audio ground, nor to give a good range of
audio volumes, and connections for the mixer chip were a mess.
Actually, electrical noise was a problem in other areas, as well;
accessing the SD card generated noise or RF leakage which would
cause the GPS unit to lose it's lock.  (So good luck loading a map
while navigating.)  Interference in bandwidth (albeit just in
contention for buses, not actually noise) was also responsible for
the limitation of not being able to use the SD card and talk to the
video processor at full rate at the same time - so playing video
from the card was not workable, either.I had some fun with the
device, learned a little bit, and ultimately rebuilt it into a
larger case with a larger battery and an amplifier for the
earpiece.  However, I would have been better served if I had done
all these things on a development board, rather than being tricked
into buying a prototype development board shaped like a phone.  The
experience led to me "missing the boat" on getting into mobile
development; it took a long time for me to get another smartphone,
because I had blown my money and my efforts on the freerunner.  For
the next couple years whenever I would consider getting another
smartphone my then-wife (now ex) would counter "yeah that's what
you said when you wanted to buy the freerunner - and you have that
and you don't even use it!"
 
  vanous - 1 hours ago
  Thank you for the summary, it perfectly pictures my experience
  too. I had spent do much time and effort (did the audio cap fix,
  baseband update and few more)... So much that even now phone
  calls with my brother (also freerunner ex-user) still start with
  "do you have an echo".I used freerunner for quite some time as
  secondary phone, developed an app or two in python/enlightenment
  (efl), wrote much of the SHR wiki manual and ended up not even
  considering Firefox phone or Ubuntu phone at all...
 
nickpsecurity - 3 hours ago
Has anyone tried to approach the Shenzhen companies doing quality
knockoffs of iPhones and Galaxies about doing a FOSS phone with
OpenMoko features? I mean, they clearly can build one. Question is
whether they would for a reasonable amount of money.
 
odammit - 2 hours ago
I bought one of these way back when. It was the model with the hole
in it for hooking to a lanyard or something else absurd...It was so
dumb and jittery I microwaved it a little and then swatted it off
my roof with a tennis racket.Was fun, would destroy again 10/10
 
eagsalazar2 - 6 hours ago
This is a project I followed pretty closely at the time and I
always felt it was doomed.  There were probably 100 reasons it
failed that I wasn't aware of but it seemed at the time like people
really wanted the open software and platform but OpenMoki got
religious about hardware which no one really wanted or cared about.
Ultimately this was the route Android went and we see the
results.It is classic for FOSS wonks (I am one!) to forget that
most people don't care about the principles of FOSS, they just care
about the practical implications of FOSS which aren't always the
same thing.
 
  problems - 6 hours ago
  Yeah, Android put the effort into software and let manufacturers
  deal with the hardware.It's sad that their approach failed
  though, I'd really like a modern device with something like
  OsmocomBB available right about now...
 
  wolfgke - 6 hours ago
  I see a contradiction in your arguments:> it seemed at the time
  like people really wanted the open software and platformvs.> It
  is classic for FOSS wonks (I am one!) to forget that most people
  don't care about the principles of FOSS
 
    eagsalazar2 - 6 hours ago
    How is that a contradiction?  My point is that open software
    has large and immediate positive implications for end users but
    hardware does not.
 
      wolfgke - 5 hours ago
      If you really want an open software and platform (statement
      1) you care about the principles of FOSS (a contradiction to
      statement 2), since if you only want some specific side
      benefits that FOSS provides, there exist "better" (quotes
      because as an FOSS fan these are note better) options.
 
paulborza - 5 hours ago
I was one of the Google Summer of Code "interns" for OpenMoko back
in 2008. I was so excited to get the free OpenMoko device and
actually implemented gesture recognition and screen orientation for
the device part of the GSoC project. Here's a video of it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2S2rQUETwcBut let me tell you
about the device:1. You couldn't even make a phone call with it.
There was a hardware bug that stopped it from making phone calls.
It was basically a PDA...2. If the battery ever ran out, you
couldn't start the phone anymore. You had to have a spare Nokia
phone that you'd use to charge that battery. Thank god they were
using Nokia-compatible batteries. The gist was, never ever to let
the phone's battery reach 0%.3. The development of any UX
components was cumbersome. They always insisted in supporting GTK
and another platform which I forgot its name. They were such a
small team and yet they were building two projects which
essentially were doing the same thing. Why?!Those three were just a
few problems. The Freerunner was definitely not a user-friendly
phone.
 
  narag - 4 hours ago
  Somewhat related: I was a little interested in Firefox OS. When I
  tried to get a device I found that I should either be in a wait
  list for months, buy a "more or less compatible" phone (it might
  work or it might not) or get a ZTE (brand that I hadn't heard of
  until then) with lackluster features at a premium price, compared
  to a regular Samsung.Being an early adopter is not for everyone,
  for sure. But being the only adopter is definitely a PITA :)
 
  joshumax - 4 hours ago
  I had issues making calls on my Freerunner, sure, and it
  certainly wasn't very user friendly (even flashing replicant to
  it resulted in a very buggy daily driver) but I did enjoy the
  phone for what it was; a fun platform to hack around with and one
  of the first (and perhaps almost the only?) mobile device with
  hackability not only in mind, but centric to its design.I hope
  alternatives like the Neo900 make it off the ground, but I'm not
  holding my breath. Most people just don't seem to care about open
  hardware when they could be getting the latest, fastest SoC for
  their $varPhone. Maybe it makes me weird that I'd rather use an
  open device with a single ARM core at 800Mhz than a closed one
  that uses the Snapdragon 835...
 
    narag - 4 hours ago
    Maybe it makes me weird that I'd rather use an open device with
    a single ARM core...IMHO, it's neither a question of being
    weird nor about the power of the phone. The problem is that
    choosing an architecture that isn't mass produced, you are
    doomed to disappear no matter what.I wouldn't care to use an
    underpowered phone, provided that it's cheap and widely
    available, being "cheap" an (important) part of "widely
    available". A hackable phone would generate interesting apps
    for a wide market. But you need that there are a lot of people
    that can buy it and has some problem accessing an Android and
    its apps.
 
  mattl - 4 hours ago
  I worked at the Free Software Foundation at the time. We were
  lucky to know someone at MIT with access to the tools to fix the
  tiny hardware bug by soldering something near the SD card slot
  IIRC.We also had multiple batteries and multiple beefy micro USB
  chargers (used later on our G1s) as well as external Nokia
  battery chargers around the place.I think I managed to take a
  call once. I could never send SMS, but I would play a lot of
  numptyphysics on the MBTA with the combination ballpoint
  pen/mechanical pencil/stylus I bought.Sean visited us in the
  office a couple of times beforehand. I remember showing him some
  of the HTML tricks Apple were doing for Mobile Safari with
  viewports and fullscreen things, I don't think anyone ever
  implemented them. This was pre-App Store too, I think.I remember
  being so wary that someone would steal my awesome new phone at
  first, but that quickly wore off and I went back to my Nokia flip
  phone until Google had developer G1s (ADP1) with a fancy
  backplate on them.
 
  emidln - 3 hours ago
  I had a FreeRunner that I used as a daily phone for a few months
  (until I got a TMobile G1). It most certainly could make phone
  calls. IIRC, I used a Qt-based environment that was basically a
  PDA + a dialer. It even had a webkit-based browser. I remember
  buying a Nokia wall charger so I could charge a second (and
  third) battery given that the OpenMoko consumed batteries
  quickly.My most memorable moment with the FreeRunner was when I
  finally received my G1. The screen on the G1 was so much
  brighter, the phone itself was far more responsive, and it had
  EDGE data service (my area didn't have 3G). I never bothered
  fixing the usb port that I broke because the G1 was so much
  better.
 
feborges - 3 hours ago
I remember John "Maddog" Hall speaking about it in Brazil. I was
just a kid at the time.
 
  mattl - 2 hours ago
  Yeah, Maddog had something he was running that was supporting
  them with Android.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koolu
 
Rjevski - 4 hours ago
As usual here's another victim of the free software problem - too
much emphasis on freedom and not enough on actual functionality.I
don't care how free your phone is, if it can't make phone calls I
don't want it, nor does anyone else.
 
uberneo - 1 hours ago
I still remember how happy i was holding the first Opensource Linux
phone in my hands back in 2008 . It was fun to compile a basic c
program using gcc . I remember my first hack of my life #1024
http://neofundas.blogspot.ie/2009/09/1024-hardware-fixdeep-s...
Also remember when at 6.30 AM in morning you have to type "ps -ef |
grep -i alarm" , find the process id and then kill -9 id  to stop
the alarm and that too using the stylus. Definitely these commands
will make sure that you will wake up 100% , a perfect alarm :)
 
wwweston - 6 hours ago
Doesn't close on a bright note:>However, the sad truth is that it
looks like there is no business case anymore for a truly open
platform based on custom-designed hardware, since people refuse to
spend extra money for tweakability, freedom, and security. Despite
us living in times where privacy is massively endangered. If anyone
out there thinks different and plans a project, please holler and
get me on board!
 
  notspanishflu - 6 hours ago
  I've hope projects like Halium, UBports, Plasma Mobile, etc end
  up bringing an open hardware project.
 
    vedanta - 5 hours ago
    Yeah, it seems like mobile oses are about as common as Linux
    distros in 1995. Sailfish, Maru, lineage, among the two you
    mention. If you have a nexus 5 or one plus one, you're in
    luck.I recently tried lineage, ubports and plasma, and though I
    liked ubports, lineage was a breath of fresh air. Selinux,
    opengapps, regular privacy notifications, twrp, and privacy and
    security seem to have not taken a back seat in general. Sign me
    up.If there hadn't been contracts 10yrs ago, I probably would
    have gotten an openmoko. Wanted one badly. If lineage, ubports,
    and plasma among others can keep developing alternatives to
    stock android, no reason to see why at least some or all
    hardware doesn't follow. It's taken AMD the better part of 10
    years to have open source drivers that are as good as their
    closed source drivers on almost all of their GPUs if I'm not
    mistaken.
 
      striking - 5 hours ago
      > If you have a nexus 5 or one plus one, you're in luck.Which
      raises the question: if you want a phone that can run a FOSS
      mobile OS, what do you choose today? Nexus 5 and OPO were
      great a few years back (I bought the latter) but there is a
      need in the marketplace for (read: I need) an updated product
      that can run such a mobile OS.
 
        notspanishflu - 5 hours ago
        Your best bet is to keep an eye on what Halium Project[+]
        choose as its reference phones.[+] https://halium.org/
 
  digi_owl - 5 hours ago
  I think it may be a bit premature.Just look at what people are
  doing with RPis and various radio boards.There was one such
  project posted on HN recently that had a RPi Zero W hooked up to
  a touch screen and a mobile radio. All battery powered.In a sense
  the Openmoko was too early and too bespoke. Thus driving the cost
  of entry for would be tinkerers through the roof.
 
    potatolicious - 4 hours ago
    I think it goes to the other poster's point: "You won't get
    users until you have something that /does something/"The RPi
    was ready to roll out of the gate - they had a working Linux
    distro from the get-go that actually worked. They also provided
    really simple instructions on how to get said Linux distro onto
    a SD card. You can boot the RPi and have it be useful within a
    matter of minutes.Openmoko simply never got near enough to
    working where the community felt like picking it up and running
    with it.I don't think Openmoko was premature - it was
    incomplete. You're not going to get much participation from the
    community if doing anything useful on your platform first
    involves fixing/finishing the platform.
 
  lallysingh - 5 hours ago
  No, that wasn't it.  I had the 2nd-gen openmoko phone.  It just
  didn't work.  You won't get users until you have something that
  /does something/.  I never even got a phone call made with it.
  The system didn't have enough of a working spine to make it worth
  investing time or energy into to get it further.If you want an
  open source project to work, it has to already work and then have
  easy places where people can start making changes.  Otherwise,
  they don't know how much work is needed to get anything done, and
  don't want to risk weeks of work for minimal, if any, results.
 
    carussell - 5 hours ago
    This is one of my most frequent criticisms about open source
    software.  jwz wrote about it almost 20 years ago.  (It can
    even apply to highly polished software like Android, or Signal,
    or Firefox today, that for one reason or another make things
    really difficult to work with?if you can work with them at
    all.)> People only really contribute when they get something
    out of it. When someone is first beginning to contribute, they
    especially need to see some kind of payback, some kind of
    positive reinforcement, right away. For example, if someone
    were running a web browser, then stopped, added a simple new
    command to the source, recompiled, and had that same web
    browser plus their addition, they would be motivated to do this
    again, and possibly to tackle even larger projects.> We never
    got there. We never distributed the source code to a working
    web browser, more importantly, to the web browser that people
    were actually using. We didn't release the source code to the
    most-previous-release of Netscape Navigator: instead, we
    released what we had at the time, which had a number of
    incomplete features, and lots and lots of bugs. And of course
    we weren't able to release any Java or crypto code at all.>
    What we released was a large pile of interesting code, but it
    didn't much resemble something you could actually use."nomo
    zilla: resignation and postmortem".  1999.
    https://www.jwz.org/gruntle/nomo.html
 
      sbierwagen - 5 hours ago
      Note that jwz redirects traffic coming from HN to an imgur
      photo of a testicle.To view this article, right click and
      choose "Open link in incognito window" or click
      https://anon.to/?https://www.jwz.org/gruntle/nomo.html
 
        Rjevski - 4 hours ago
        Does he? I just clicked on the link and it was fine for me,
        no genitalia so far.Maybe he's got a whitelist for some
        specific articles he allows HN to view.Edit: never mind
        it's just my browser somehow stripping referer headers.
 
          sbierwagen - 3 hours ago
            $ curl -IA "foo" https://www.jwz.org/gruntle/nomo.html
          HTTP/1.1 200 OK      $ curl -IA "foo" --referer
          "news.ycombinator.com"
          https://www.jwz.org/gruntle/nomo.html   HTTP/1.1 302
          Found   Location: http://i.imgur.com/32R3qLv.png  Are you
          using an addon that strips referer headers?
 
          Rjevski - 3 hours ago
          Safari with uBlock Origin. It could just be Safari's
          default configuration that for some reason strips
          referers. In any case I'm glad it protects me from this
          sort of stuff especially at work. What a dick move from
          JWZ (no pun intended).
 
      fit2rule - 2 hours ago
      In my opinion, with a couple of phase 0 devices sitting in
      their fancy lock-tite boxes gathering dust - while the dev
      workbench is littered with current-target mobile devices far
      in advance - the only difference is that the hardware team
      behind OpenMoko ran out of gumption/funding/$$$.Hardware is
      much harder to do, the more you screw it up.Designs which
      don't work - i.e. basic power management - will cripple
      early-stage hardware development, and its one of the reasons
      hardware, is well .. hard.OpenMoko didn't screw up, open-
      source-wise, no sir.  I think you are mistaken in this
      claim.Where they screwed up is not getting the hardware
      really nailed, such that it warranted actual production in
      the 10's of 1000's of units.  It had to work, and you have to
      ship in the 5x'es before you gain any traction with a new
      hardware platform.OpenMoko was many things (I still have 3)
      .. but it wasn't a failure of open source software.  Without
      that stack, the thing wouldn't have even gotten off the
      ground.  It didn't reach orbit, because of that 5x traction
      ..
 
      sethrin - 1 hours ago
      I think that jwz enjoyed a reputation beyond his deserts. I
      don't find him particularly insightful. I also don't seem to
      take your point in mentioning this? Is this really an "open
      source" thing? Is it a bad thing, or merely an effect of a
      normal software development practice?
 
        carussell - 31 minutes ago
        Although I don't know what "a reputation beyond his deserts
        means", I do know that focusing on jwz is not relevant.
        Either the message is true, or it isn't.  Anything else is
        classic ad hominem and a digression from the point, you
        know?> Is this really an "open source" thing?Well, that the
        software be source be open to hack on is something that's
        pretty much a precondition to the situation where some
        random person finds themselves attempting to contribute to
        someone else's project.  If you know of a way that's
        possible with anything that isn't open source, then maybe
        give an example?  (If you interpreted my comment as one
        intended to be an argument against open source?and in favor
        of closed source, say?then you interpreted it
        incorrectly.)> Is it a bad thingA project that seeks
        contributors but exists in a state where contribution is
        more difficult than it could be is very much something I
        would call a bad thing.> normal software
        development"Normal"?  Maybe.  Yes, even.  But not an
        intrinsic side effect of trying to develop software or run
        a project.
 
scarhill - 2 hours ago
I also still have my Freerunner in a drawer somewhere. I bought the
phone early on and then ended up starting the android-on-freerunner
project[1], when Koolu, the company that had begun an Android port,
abandoned the project. I used the Cupcake version as a daily driver
for quite a while, but it was never anywhere near as stable as a
"real" phone.1 - https://gitlab.com/android-on-freerunner/android-
on-freerunn...
 
mikepurvis - 4 hours ago
I'm grateful to OpenMoko every time I fire up dfu-util to flash
something over USB.
 
k__ - 3 hours ago
I remember 2007, when I started my bachelors degree some senior
students had one and were so proud.Half a year later, nobody talked
about it anymore and it was iPhone all the way.
 
throw7 - 5 hours ago
I could be wrong, but my feeling at the time was there was a lack
of experience of a strong low-level hardware designer.  I remember
bug #1024... all I really wanted to use my freerunner daily was
making/receiving calls (you know basic phone stuff), something flip
phones at the time were absolutely rock-solid at.