GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-24) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Raneto - Markdown Knowledgebase Platform
105 points by iamdeedubs
http://raneto.com/
___________________________________________________________________
 
mcone - 5 hours ago
Previous discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7832991
 
olav - 1 hours ago
I wonder what makes this a _knowledge base_ as opposed to a flat
file CMS?A few months ago I left Evernote for my own implementation
because I felt that Evernote gave me too little expressive power:
No hierarchy, no typed relationships, no plugins. Basically, I was
looking for a combination of outliner and concept map, combined
with easy image handling. Plus, I wanted to easily add
_applications_ like an ebook library, journaling, timelines of
events, and generation of static websites and presentations.I am a
huge fan of simplicity and even toyed with PicoCMS by the same
author as Raneto. Ultimately though, at least for me, a combination
of a simple mysql database with markdown as content format gave me
the power I wanted for my personal knowledge base,
https://knowfox.com
 
drhayes9 - 4 hours ago
I've been starting to suffer from Markdown fatigue and
investigating tools that support RST or asciidoc. I wonder if this
system might support those tools in the future?
 
  pspeter3 - 3 hours ago
  Any reasons for the markdown fatigue?
 
    drhayes9 - 2 hours ago
    Most of Markdown is great for me and feels natural. Headings,
    bold, italics, lists -- those are all great.Examples that don't
    feel natural are image syntax, dropping down to HTML for
    unsupported features (pre-supposes output format), emphasis on
    presentation vs. semantics, the various flavors of writing
    tables, etc. How do I write an index? A table of contents? Any
    way to differentiate a footnote or an aside from a basic
    link?YAML front matter is a great ad hoc standard for including
    metadata about a document within the document. It would be
    great if the various flavors of Markdown standardized on that,
    too.
 
    WorldMaker - 2 hours ago
    Having used a lot of markdown and reStructuredText, I can see
    the arguments that the lack of common standards in markdown is
    a huge pain. There's still a lot of variety between markdown
    implementations and while Common Mark and open GFM standards
    are helping to a point, you still can't always count on a
    markdown engine to have things as basic as definition list
    support or HTML anchor support (linkable ids for sub-headings),
    and there are still some weird subtle implementation
    differences in those things.There's also a lot to be said about
    the way that reStructuredText provides standard plugin spaces
    in the markup. While it may look over verbose at first glance,
    it is a great thing when you start to pick up that a lot of
    reStructuredText is based on the same plugin markup and there's
    a consistent way to work with new plugins. Something like that
    could be hugely useful to Markdown, and probably could have
    stymied some of the complications in standardizing things like
    Common Mark and GFM had that consideration been baked in from
    early on.
 
    geraldbauer - 3 hours ago
    I've started work on an evolved markdown version called text
    with instructions (.texti) [1]. Anyways, what's broken in
    markdown?  The image links are ugly e.g. ![](fail.gif). Why not
    {{pic.gif}}? Almost everybody incl. Wikipedia markup is using =
    for headings e.g. =Heading 1=. Why not also in Markdown?
    Another good reason is that # is the "universal" comment marker
    in the unix world. If you mix and match yaml front matter /
    back matter (meta data) with comments - why not use the same
    comments? Did you know - there are no comments in markdown. And
    so on and so on.  It's time to fix (evolve) markdown.
    Cheers.[1] More at -> https://texti.github.io
 
  dsr_ - 3 hours ago
  You could use Pelican (getpelican.com) -- it's an SSG that
  supports Markdown and RST and asciidoc and is generally
  extensible.
 
    arfar - 1 hours ago
    Pelican is great for blogs. I don't know that I'd suggest it
    for a "Knowledgebase".
 
  type0 - 1 hours ago
  I wonder also, gitbook-cli supports both md and adoc. Asciidoctor
  is easier to write and you don't have to use its advanced
  features for it to become superior to Markdown.== What is easier
  to write?or// adoc comment== What is easier to
  write?![](md-foo.jpg)orimage:adoc-
  foo.jpg[link="http://foo.com"]== What is easier to write?1. first
  md - no auto numbering2. second md - no auto numbering3. third md
  - no auto numberingor. first adoc - auto numbering. second adoc -
  auto numbering. third adoc - auto numberingWhat is easier to
  write?[Get the PDF]({% raw %}{{ site.url }}{% endraw %}/assets
  /my-md-file.pdf)orlink:{ctx_path}/assets/my-adoc-file.pdf[Get the
  PDF]
 
  jldugger - 3 hours ago
  The readthedocs engine is RST friendly. Personally I prefer
  documentation that's easy to write and RST is not that.
 
    drhayes9 - 3 hours ago
    I admit, I haven't tried to write a lot of RST or asciidoc
    beyond playing around with it. And it's a good point -- docs
    that are hard to write don't get written.
 
  mcone - 3 hours ago
  Asciidoctor has a plugin for Jekyll you might be interested in:
  https://github.com/asciidoctor/jekyll-asciidoc
 
bastijn - 2 hours ago
My favorite for now stays mkdocs (http://www.mkdocs.org/). For
relative small ones with the material theme
(http://squidfunk.github.io/mkdocs-material/) and bigger ones
(because of top bar) with bootswatch theme (http://mkdocs.github.io
/mkdocs-bootswatch/). It works the same, just builds a site from
your MD files but creates a static site which can be hosted
anywhere (e.g. github/gitlab pages via auto CI). Editing and
creating your own theme is also easy and documented.Installation is
easiest I found for docs sites (pip install mkdocs) and it's
blazingly fast. Comes with good themes and proper responsive design
(saw some issues in Raneto on my ios). Has proper live reloading
and build in serve functionality.For large projects (enterprise
size) we have made our own version based on what I learned from the
Polymer docs (https://github.com/Polymer/doc) but removed the GAE
requirement. Also, we are considering if using SO Enterprise is a
good solution. Personally I'm in favor for in house docs and
knowledge sharing for that. It's so flexible and people are already
used to it. But that is a different ball park considering the OP.To
end with a positive note. Raneto seems to support much of the same
as mkdocs or any of its alternatives. It looks good and whilst
static site is something I want I understand it is not a deal
breaker for all. In addition, Raneto mentions authentication is
built in which is a nice thing if I want to host for internal stuff
on a public domain so external customers can also use it without
requiring a VPN account. Overall, nice work! Not for today, but I
have bookmarked it.
 
  squidfunk - 52 minutes ago
  I'm the author of the Material theme which actually has a top
  bar, a feature called tabs, see http://squidfunk.github.io
  /mkdocs-material/getting-started/#...
 
EddieRingle - 4 hours ago
Why something like this instead of?for instance?a wiki?
 
  bastijn - 2 hours ago
  It is a much heavier setup and wikis have been out of favor past
  years. As of such their theming and configuration is not up to
  par when compared to the new kids on the block. In my company
  (multinational) even IT is phasing out its support, which usually
  means it's really dying ;).
 
  patrickdavey - 3 hours ago
  Yup, was thinking the same. Vimwiki in markdown format and can
  render the entire wiki to html.
 
  FutureSpec - 3 hours ago
  A wiki would require a backing database and server process (I
  think). This platform is flat files.
 
    toomim - 3 hours ago
    This requires a server process.
 
    Spivak - 3 hours ago
    Dokuwiki is flat files only.
 
drew-y - 6 hours ago
Looks great! One thing that would be nice would be the ability for
Raneto to act as a static Docs generator. Looks like you have to
use nodejs as the server as it stands. I'd like to be able to use a
simple static http-server.
 
  rfrank - 3 hours ago
  Hugo with a theme like docdock is pretty neat (http://gohugo.io/
  & http://docdock.netlify.com/)
 
    bedros - 3 hours ago
    how would you add a new post (for a blog) edit a file, and
    upload it to the site?
 
      reificator - 2 hours ago
      What works for me with Hugo (because I'm already using these
      tools all day anyway) is to keep the site in a Github
      repository.Then when I make a change it triggers TravisCI to
      do a full site rebuild. (Takes longer to install Hugo than to
      actually run it)Then once it's built, Travis has built in
      support for uploading to S3, and away we go.Doesn't work for
      everyone, but it's really smooth and simple for me, I can
      even just go to Github, create a new page, and save it right
      there from the site.  Which means I can edit from any device
      I want.
 
  adammenges - 5 hours ago
  Yeah that be a great addition
 
  aizatto - 4 hours ago
  I've been using Phenomic https://phenomic.io for my personal site
  https://www.aizatto.com
 
    carussell - 3 hours ago
    It looks like something that could be handled just as well
    using Heckle by Marijn Haverbeke.  It reads content and layouts
    from a Jekyll-like directory structure.  Naturally, it uses
    CodeMirror for syntax
    highlighting.http://marijnhaverbeke.nl/blog/heckle.html
 
    michaelmior - 3 hours ago
    There are loads of options for static site generators (here[0]
    is a good list of ~200), but it doesn't solve all problems. One
    question, for example, is how to get search functionality.[0]
    https://www.staticgen.com/