GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-24) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Verizon Throttles Netflix Subscribers in Test It Doesn't Inform
Customers About
405 points by sharkweek
https://www.techdirt.com/blog/netneutrality/articles/20170722/03...
170722/03252237838/verizon-throttles-netflix-subscribers-test-it-doesnt-inform-customers-about.shtml
___________________________________________________________________
 
menzoic - 6 hours ago
"Test"
 
[deleted]
 
dsmithatx - 5 hours ago
They throttled users to 10Mbps to Netflix.  The article states this
shouldn't be an issue streaming a show at x resolution.  I have 5
people and four TV's in my family.  It is common to have 4
different shows going on Netflix.  We all have different schedules
and can't always watch the new OITNB on the same day.If I'm paying
Netflix and paying Verizon for 40+ Mbps wouldn't this impact us?
Shouldn't I be able to watch four shows at once if I pay my bill on
time?
 
  ben174 - 3 hours ago
  This is Verizon Wireless.
 
supercanuck - 6 hours ago
And Netflix is blocking VPN's. The original reason was it didn't
have licenses for certain regions, but then what of original
content?I'm tired of being used as a pawn in this bullshit game.
 
  Bjartr - 6 hours ago
  Just because they created the content doesn't mean they have
  ownership of all IP involved. Music especially can be a PITA, see
  the videogame Alan Wake being unsellable because the licensing
  for the music used in the game ran out.
 
    mrkrabo - 2 hours ago
    San Andreas in Steam has received several "updates" that just
    removed songs from the radio. :(
 
    shmerl - 1 hours ago
    It doesn't mean they should block VPNs since it's effectively a
    discriminatory (bordering on xenophobic) practice, same as
    rejecting foreigners in a physical store.
 
      vertex-four - 1 hours ago
      Unfortunately they've likely been forced into it by their
      content providers.
 
        shmerl - 7 minutes ago
        I think more likely by local distributors, who have too
        much leverage on said content providers. Local distribution
        is often at odds with global Internet one.
 
    cobythedog - 4 hours ago
    That's very true. I can't stream one of my favorite shows,
    Northern Exposure, because of the music licensing. They even
    had to change some music in order to release the DVDs.
    http://actsofvolition.com/2005/03/musiclicensing/
 
      thanksgiving - 2 hours ago
      I immediately thought of Married... with Childrenhttps://en.w
      ikipedia.org/wiki/Married..._with_Children> Its theme song is
      "Love and Marriage" by Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen,
      performed by Frank Sinatra from the 1955 television
      production Our Town....> The Sony DVD box sets from season 3
      onward do not feature the original "Love and Marriage" theme
      song in the opening sequence. This was done because Sony was
      unable to obtain the licensing rights to the song for later
      sets. Despite this, the end credits on the DVDs for season 3
      still include a credit for "Love and Marriage."
 
        rhizome - 2 hours ago
        "WKRP In Cincinnati" is the archetype for this problem.
 
          tracker1 - 1 hours ago
          "The Wonder Years" is another one...
 
          CWuestefeld - 1 hours ago
          And yet another demonstration of how recordings of
          questionable provenance are superior in many ways to the
          properly authorized ones.
 
      mattmanser - 1 hours ago
      The music was a great part of the show too! It was definitely
      missing something when I rewatched it.
 
    aczerepinski - 2 hours ago
    I used to do work re-writing music for tv shows when they went
    to syndication in other countries. I did it in hopes that it
    would lead to bigger gigs but that was naive/silly in
    hindsight. It's probably been 10 years since I did one of those
    gigs, but I'm sure others are out there still doing it for
    music, movies and games.
 
    rmc - 3 hours ago
    I have heard this was a problem for Top Gear. They'd include a
    music clip like The A Team jingle in a clip because the BBC
    would have a licence to broadcast that. And when they want to
    show that episode outside the UK, they need to patch the show
    to use different music instead that they have a licence to.
 
      semi-extrinsic - 3 hours ago
      House MD has a completely different intro theme outside the
      US, because they didn't get a worldwide license of Massive
      Attack's "Teardrop".
 
  [deleted]
 
  pasbesoin - 4 hours ago
  I'm moving towards pulling the plug in terms of my money -- my
  subscription -- going to pay for such behavior.  I've come to
  believe it's being used more against me (locking things down,
  walled gardens, artificial limits to access, culture, knowledge,
  and creation -- building on what's come before), than it is being
  used to my benefit (e.g. here, entertainment -- which with the
  ever increasingly balkanized for-pay libraries, is becoming more
  limited and more expensive).So, like stopping paying AT&T to
  essentially lobby against better connectivity in my neighborhood,
  it's time for my financial support -- playing "by the rules" --
  to these big IP rent-seekers, to stop.P.S.  I'm the guy who
  actually buys CD's after a show.  Will cough up bucks for
  funding.  I'm not opposed to paying for what I get, in reasonable
  -- even generous -- measure.  However, I no longer feel that's
  what's going on, here.
 
  ams6110 - 2 hours ago
  > I'm tired of being used as a pawn in this bullshit game.So
  cancel your Netflix.
 
    uncled1023 - 2 hours ago
    How would canceling Netflix affect Verizon?
 
  jrs95 - 6 hours ago
  Makes me wonder if continued escalation might push more people
  back towards Blu-Rays. Personally, I prefer just purchasing
  content anyways. Then if Netflix or whoever has to pull it, I
  still have it.
 
    veridies - 6 hours ago
    I actually just subscribe to Netflix' DVD service. I get films
    in much higher quality delivered every other day, and I use
    MakeMKV to copy them onto my computer for when I want to watch
    them.Films I can't get there, I just pirate. I'm not interested
    in installing DRM platforms on my computer to be able to watch
    very heavily compressed videos if they haven't been yanked
    offline yet.
 
      kbenson - 1 hours ago
      > I actually just subscribe to Netflix' DVD service. I get
      films in much higher quality delivered every other dayThat
      probably doesn't help with things that aren't on DVD/Blu-Ray,
      such as some of their original content.  I don't think you
      can get Stranger Things in that format yet.> I'm not
      interested in installing DRM platforms on my computerI
      believe the majority of people don't watch Netflix on their
      computer, but instead on set-top devices connected to their
      TV's That may also include hybrid solutions like Chromecast,
      where something may be installed on a local computer (likely
      a phone) as well, but those generally already have DRM
      platforms installed...
 
      supercanuck - 6 hours ago
      That sounds like a lot of work just to plop my kid in front
      of Dora on the tablet so I can have an hour of sanity before
      dinner.
 
        scottLobster - 4 hours ago
        A lot of initial work maybe.  I rip all of my movies with
        MakeMKV to a Plex Media Server running on an old 2009
        desktop.  The setup can take a while, mostly picking
        through extras on the disk and naming them properly.  But
        the interface is just as slick as Netflix and they have an
        app for practically every device.  And if you don't care
        about the extras ripping the movies is essentially just
        pushing a button on MakeMKV.If you're looking for a weekend
        project and have a movie/TV collection I'd highly recommend
        it.  The base software is free and it runs on linux (and
        Windows/OSX).
 
        gm-conspiracy - 5 hours ago
        I've often heard that parenting requires a great deal of
        responsibility.
 
      givinguflac - 3 hours ago
      Honestly, that just seems like a waste of time to me.
      Regardless of "much" higher quality, at best you're getting
      480p from a DVD. I'll take acceptable quality 1080p over
      great quality 480p every day of the week. What's more, you're
      still pirating, so why not just download full quality BD rips
      if you're going to bother?
 
        fulafel - 2 hours ago
        Nitpick: SD DVD is be 576p at best.
 
        swsieber - 2 hours ago
        You can get BD through Netflix's DVD program.
 
        Rebelgecko - 2 hours ago
        Jeeze, I wish Netflix would stream in DVD quality for me.
        Their DRM hates my setup for whatever reason, so I'm stuck
        at a 1 or 2 mbps stream.
 
      ghaff - 1 hours ago
      Unfortunately, their back catalog is getting worse and worse.
      If it weren't for ripping what they do still have for later
      watching I probably would. But I've started thinking of just
      dropping their DVD service and putting the money toward
      purchases, paid streaming, and Redbox.
 
    wil421 - 6 hours ago
    If I wanted to buy the BluRays of all the series I've watched
    on Netflix it would be way too costly. Buying the release day
    cost for a new seasons BluRay is even more expensive than the
    14.99 or whatever I spend for HD Netflix.I rarely rewatch
    seasons after more than 5 years so streaming is usually the
    best/cost effective option.
 
      khedoros1 - 2 hours ago
      > If I wanted to buy the BluRays of all the series I've
      watched on Netflix it would be way too costly.Ditto, but
      almost everything I watch is one-and-done. The series that I
      like enough to watch more than once are few and far
      between...so I tend to buy those, whenever they come up in a
      particularly good sale. Among things I liked enough to buy,
      the longer it's been since I watched it last, the more likely
      I am to watch it in the near future. But the longer I wait,
      the more likely that some contract expires, and it disappears
      from streaming services.
 
      phinnaeus - 5 hours ago
      Plus the physical space cost of storing discs. Even if you
      remove them from their cases, which is definitely sub-
      optimal, they take up a decent amount of storage space.
 
        criddell - 3 hours ago
        Exactly. Buying digital copies on iTunes makes a lot more
        sense to me just for that reason.
 
          ocdtrekkie - 2 hours ago
          Digital copies on iTunes are priced somewhere near
          "highway robbery". Because of the lack of retail-style
          transactions, there's no price competition on digital
          copies. What's funny, it's usually cheaper to buy the
          Blu-ray/DVD/digital copy combo packs... even if you just
          want the digital copy.Recently I picked up a couple Blu-
          rays with digital copies for $3 at Fry's. Vudu had one of
          them on a huuuuuuuge sale this weekend, digital copy
          only, for $5. The iTunes price is $14.99. Again, I got
          that $15 iTunes price... for $3 as physical copy with a
          digital code. And if I wanted, I could sell the disc at a
          resale shop and get back a buck or two. Buying video on
          demand online right now makes no financial sense
          whatsoever.
 
          criddell - 2 hours ago
          >  Buying video on demand online right now makes no
          financial sense whatsoever.That's only if you place
          little or no value on convenience. I don't spend much
          money on video, so the occasional $10 or $20 purchase is
          bearable.I don't want a physical copy and I certainly
          don't want to go to Fry's. For me, iTunes / Google Play /
          Amazon Video all make more sense.I've actually thought
          about cancelling cable and buying everything on demand
          because I think I would save some money. We're paying
          more than $1000 / year for TV. That would pay for a lot
          of TV at $2-$3 per episode. We've never made the jump
          though because of live sports and the stupid blackout
          rules.
 
          khedoros1 - 43 minutes ago
          > That's only if you place little or no value on
          convenience.I place a fair amount of value on
          convenience, but I weight it differently than you do. Not
          having to worry about my player's internet connection is
          a big plus. Not caring where I bought the video from is
          also nice. I like that it's a fire-and-forget operation
          to convert the video into a format that works on
          virtually every piece of video-oriented electronics that
          I own.Bonuses: I get to choose which version of a
          particular video that I buy (there are often several
          available), often receive it in multiple formats, can
          loan it to a friend, and local media tends to have fewer
          compression artifacts than streamed media.Of course, all
          this only applies to things that I care enough to buy
          separately. I've got Netflix and Amazon. I've got a few
          hundred games through a combination of half a dozen
          services, and it's a pain figuring out which service I
          bought a particular game through, and all that. I'd
          rather go to my wallet of game DVDs and pull it out (and
          I do, for services like Humble Bundle and GOG, where I
          can download the games and put the installers on external
          media).
 
          ocdtrekkie - 1 hours ago
          I'd have to be pretty loaded to want to spend 500% the
          price for minor convenience. ;) Similar major discounts
          are available via Amazon Prime as well, if you can wait
          two days for it to arrive.
 
          criddell - 1 hours ago
          > I'd have to be pretty loaded to want to spend 500% the
          price for minor convenience.I bet you do it too. Ever
          order a pizza for delivery rather than make it yourself?
          Or buy a book rather than borrow it from the library?
 
  Spivak - 6 hours ago
  Because it's not worth the effort to allow VPNs, but only allow
  content that's available globally since they can't figure out
  where the traffic really originates?Honestly, if you're at the
  point where you're circumventing region locking to access
  Netflix, you should just pirate it. You're violating copyright
  either way.
 
    tgeorge - 5 hours ago
    I had to stop using Hurricane Electric for IPv6 tunneling
    because Netflix was blocking them.
 
      toast0 - 3 hours ago
      If you get a Roku box, it doesn't know how to do IPv6, so you
      can keep using HE ;)
 
    twinkletwinkle - 6 hours ago
    I think the commenter you replied to is saying "region locks"
    are as unfair / unnecessary as Verizon's business practices.
 
    veridies - 6 hours ago
    > Honestly, if you're at the point where you're circumventing
    region locking to access Netflix, you should just pirate it.
    You're violating copyright either way.Many people think it's an
    ethical requirement to pay artists for their work. So even if
    they're okay (arguably) violating the law, they might not be
    okay with just taking the art without paying at all.
 
      tomc1985 - 1 hours ago
      As if the system for compensating artists was in any way
      equitable for them. We're better off with piracy, at least
      noone is pretending to support them... right now the
      economics are just downright predatory.
 
      rdiddly - 3 hours ago
      Kinda funny how a VPN - a perfectly sensible
      defensive/precautionary strategy for any purpose -
      automatically equals something nefarious to these schmoes.  I
      use a VPN all the time, including for the most benign
      activities... I just leave it on all the time.  So it's
      always weird and I never quite seem to get used to it, when
      some site like Netflix (not that I use Netflix) singles my IP
      address out.  It always takes me a minute to realize, "Oh
      they think I'm like sup3r 31337 haxxx0r5 because of the VPN."
      So to protect their security and prove how trustworthy I am,
      I have to let down my security.  Where's the give & take?
      It's just weird.
 
        overcast - 3 hours ago
        Because more often then not, VPN is used to circumvent
        something they shouldn't be accessing. Just like torrents
        are essentially used to download pirated software. I bet
        you side with pirates, because they are only trying to
        "test" the software first.
 
          rdiddly - 3 hours ago
          Citation needed.  You're obviously part of the cohort
          that wants to jump to faulty conclusions about it.  And I
          "side" with me.
 
          rocqua - 2 hours ago
          If netflix found that the majority of VPN connections
          were to avoid region locking, would you agree that
          blocking VPNs to enforce region locking makes
          sense?Because to me, it makes sense.
 
          __jal - 2 hours ago
          > more often then not, VPN is used to circumvent
          something they shouldn't be accessingWho knew Cisco was
          selling enterprise-grade circumvention devices to the
          world's corporations? Somebody better notify the
          MPAA!More seriously, this type of thinking is pernicious.
          It demands "consumers" simply "consume" is easy-to-
          control ways, stay in their lanes and not be
          suspicious.There would be no internet if people did that.
          Don't get me wrong; if people want to be sheep, they can
          be. I will happily encrypt, tunnel, send weird packets
          and otherwise play on the net the way it was intended,
          and anyone with a problem with that can chose not to do
          business with me if they prefer more tractable clientele
          who will shut up and eat what they're fed.
 
          FireBeyond - 32 minutes ago
          You jest, but in fact, MPAA, RIAA, absolutely -have- in
          the past tried to mandate, lobby, require that enterprise
          devices do L7 inspection for exactly this reason. They
          have been more than happy to argue that their member's
          products should have explicit preventions in third party
          hardware and software (at the third partys expense, of
          course) to protect revenue.And on the flip side, certain
          firewall providers have marketed similar features to
          restrictive regimes such as China for the Great Firewall.
          And not just 'nudge nudge wink wink', but produced
          marketing material saying "This will help you prevent
          Falun Gong material being available, and help identify
          end users trying to access this material."
 
          Spivak - 2 hours ago
          And if you were on a corporate VPN you wouldn't get
          detected and blocked by Netflix.Let's not be disingenuous
          here: we're not talking about VPN the technology -- it's
          impossible to detect if someone's traffic has passed
          though a VPN. We're talking about public 'VPN Services'
          which are all but billed for circumventing region
          locking, ISP throttling, and piracy.Any kind of content
          provider would blacklist those endpoints in a second.
 
      psadauskas - 6 hours ago
      Then keep paying Netflix to stay in the lighter gray side of
      morality, and still torrent the shows of theirs you want to
      watch but can't.
 
        kuschku - 1 hours ago
        That?s exactly what I do.I pay for Netflix and Amazon
        Prime, and still pirate all the content.I?m on Linux, and
        they only provide 144p video for me, so pirating is easier
        for getting access to content I paid for.
 
        problems - 6 hours ago
        Does Netflix pay out if you don't watch the content?It also
        may make it more likely that Netflix will drop the content
        if it's not getting good enough numbers.
 
          aaron695 - 1 hours ago
          You'd have to imagine Netflix does more than viewing
          numbers since it's not ads that makes them money but
          subscribers to the overall service.If a show is getting
          press and social media talk then they probably value that
          higher since new subscribers is of very high value.
          Retention is a different problem and not as particular to
          one show.
 
          e40 - 5 hours ago
          I often wondered this.  I don't believe it does.  My
          guess is that royalties are paid on a per-use basis.
          Anyone know?
 
          jdmichal - 4 hours ago
          My complete guess:Netflix mass-negotiates content
          contracts with distributors for lump sums. The
          distributor then pays out one-time royalties from that
          lump sum.
 
          logfromblammo - 1 hours ago
          My guess is similar, except that the distributor never
          actually pays out royalties; instead using Hollywood-
          accounting to funnel the extra money away into the
          contract for some captive film-rights service company
          owned by contacts and cronies.
 
          bpodgursky - 5 hours ago
          I really doubt there is any per-view payout.  There would
          be no point in their constant content churn if they were
          able (or wanted to) negotiate per-view contracts.
 
          Fizzer - 4 hours ago
          The view numbers surely get used during contract
          negotiations, though.  When a movie's contract runs out
          and Netflix needs to figure out how much they're willing
          to bid to renew it, they'll look at the view numbers as
          one factor in determining how much they're willing to
          bid.So even if there isn't a per-view payout, I'm sure
          the view numbers do contribute to the studio getting more
          money.
 
      [deleted]
 
      amelius - 1 hours ago
      > Many people think it's an ethical requirement to pay
      artists for their work.I don't think that way. Everybody
      deserves a reasonable income, but what these "artists" make
      is totally insane. The only reason I watch their movies is
      because with the help of their fans, they have created an
      artificial monopoly around their persona and I am basically
      forced to watch them. In a free market with intelligent
      consumers, these people would not make this much.
 
        cynicalkane - 46 minutes ago
        Man, if you think TV and movies is the path to
        wealth...Most productions that people watch have somewhere
        between hundreds and tens of thousands of people working on
        them. Almost none of them are rich, including most of the
        producers, directors, and stars of your favorite shows--who
        are usually locked into contracts they signed before their
        shows got big, and shows almost never get big. The number
        of people who will get rich from a given TV show or movie
        is between zero and almost zero.99% of show business is
        folks trying to get by, same as anywhere else. Most people
        in show business could earn more doing almost anything
        else. Almost all of them make less than some kid in Silicon
        Valley building Tinder for Dogs. Programmers at Netflix
        make far, far more than almost every artist and even many
        of the financiers, and few here would complain about
        that.Pay for your content.
 
          amelius - 24 minutes ago
          Movies and TV shows have become much more expensive than
          in the 80s, and yet I don't think they are much better.
          It's as if producers are throwing in money instead of
          creativity. I just can't support that to the extent that
          they expect me to.Also, we should all benefit from
          economies of scale, not just the film producers.
 
        logfromblammo - 1 hours ago
        I have seen enough MST3K to know that an actor that is
        skilled at the craft is worth quite a bit more than I had
        previously suspected.  You really don't know what you've
        got 'til it's gone.In a free market with intelligent
        consumers, these people would not make quite so much, but
        it would still be a significant amount.People that can
        uphold a willing suspension of disbelief are rare enough,
        but those who can invoke it are the ones truly deserving of
        that reasonable income.  Those folks aren't always the
        actors.  Sometimes it's the writers, directors, or even the
        make-up or foley artists.  Those people that don't get face
        time in front of the public might not always get the
        recognition they deserve, and they're the ones we really
        want to be paid for their art.  But there are a lot of
        people shaving money off the wad before it gets to them, so
        putting too much cash in their hands is a small price to
        pay so that those who deserve it can actually make a
        living.
 
        matt4077 - 1 hours ago
        They haven't "created an artificial monopoly around their
        persona". You've just created an artificial justification
        around your actions.You're also not "basically forced to
        watch them".HBO operates with a margin of 33% (1.7Billion
        income on 4.9 Billion of revenue). That's healthy, but it
        isn't "totally insane". There isn't much room to spare
        before they'd have to sacrifice quality. That'd be quite
        sad, considering the last decade is generally regarded as a
        golden age of TV.
 
          amelius - 10 minutes ago
          > You're also not "basically forced to watch them".What
          other method do you suggest for me to stay up to date on
          pop culture, considering I do not want to support it?
 
        dgacmu - 30 minutes ago
        > The only reason I watch their movies is because with the
        help of their fans, they have created an artificial
        monopoly around their persona and I am basically forced to
        watch them.I think I've seen that scene... Clockwork
        Orange, right?  http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccMa
        nager/clips/clock...Perhaps... perhaps you might choose a
        different phrasing than "forced to watch"?
 
      rhino369 - 1 hours ago
      By VPNing into content, you aren't really paying artists. You
      pay Netflix, but Netflix doesn't license the content. So
      really you are just paying Netflix for stuff you are
      effectively pirating. Skip the middle man.It's like buying
      stolen art.
 
        FireBeyond - 38 minutes ago
        You still have to pay for an account. Which is used to pay
        licensing fees.The difference is "This dollar came from a
        user in the US", versus "This dollar came from a user in
        Eastern Europe (or wherever Netflix isn't
        available)".Netflix is still licensing the content, just
        not for your (real) jurisdiction.To imply that it's better,
        then, to just outright pirate the content is... confusing.
 
    problems - 5 hours ago
    > Because it's not worth the effort to allow VPNs, but only
    allow content that's available globally since they can't figure
    out where the traffic really originates?You don't really need
    to, you just need to say "VPN IP? Okay, you get our own global
    content only."They're already doing the VPN IP test.
 
  gumby - 2 hours ago
  > And Netflix is blocking VPN's. The original reason was it
  didn't have licenses for certain regions, but then what of
  original content?This is a good point, but note that a bunch of
  the special "Netflix" content is actually licensed from another
  country.  Also some of "their" content is stuff funded in concert
  with others, who will have retained certain restrictions (bogusly
  called "rights" in legalese)So the total amount of material
  Netflix owns free and clear probably isn't big enough for them to
  bother with special-casing.  If it were it would be in their
  interest to do so as a way of putting pressure on others.
 
coverband - 5 hours ago
If the test is "At what point will customers notice and start
complaining?", it makes sense... :)
 
kyle-rb - 3 hours ago
It was really a great move on Netflix's part to make their own
speedtest site, allowing their customers to audit their providers
specifically on their Netflix connection.
 
  Buttons840 - 54 minutes ago
  Why don't we have smart routers doing this? I wish my router
  could tell me "the fastest connection I have observed this month
  is 10mbps". Basically doing a non stop speed test. Im sure I
  could set it up myself, but I'd like an easy to use package.
 
  okreallywtf - 2 hours ago
  https://fast.com/
 
brainfire - 6 hours ago
Note this is Verizon Wireless, the cell service company - not
Verizon Fios, the home ISP company. They are both under Verizon
Communications, but as far as I can tell this "test" only affected
wireless customers.
 
  empath75 - 6 hours ago
  Yeah, I have gigabit fios and I was getting like 250mbps on that
  test (I have a 300mpbs wifi connection to the router)
 
  thebiglebrewski - 6 hours ago
  I have gigabit Fios and my Netflix connection is always throttled
  down to 150 Mbps. I wish there was something I could do about it
  because I actually do watch 4K content.But really...it's still
  pretty good so I don't care enough? This is probably why they do
  it.
 
    bb611 - 1 hours ago
    Netflix's recommended connection speed for 4k is 25 Mb/s.So
    what exactly does "do something about it" mean in this
    circumstance? Is your download rate actually saturating your
    throttled connection?
 
      thebiglebrewski - 1 hours ago
      Yeah you're probably right that it doesn't affect me, I guess
      I'm just pointing it out.
 
    vel0city - 1 hours ago
    Even if you're being throttled down to 150Mbit for Netflix
    streams, their 4K content is usually 15-20Mbit with their
    recommended throughput being 25Mbit. You can comfortably stream
    6 Netflix 4K streams even at 150Mbit.
 
nwatson - 39 minutes ago
I'm working from Copenhagen right now.  A valid-for-one-month 30GB
data + 600 unlimited minutes on Lebara SIM card is $15 (and that
includes free international calling to, e.g., USA or Brazil or
wherever), and I can re-up at any time.  I've been using SIM Card +
mobile hot-spot to access the internet, web, VPN, AWS, etc. from a
number of places.  Speed is very good.  I wish it were like this in
the US.Coverage in my home area of North Carolina (the Triad !=
Triangle) is quite good, Verizon is kind of expensive.  It's a lot
better than coverage I had living in the SF Bay Area -- whenever I
go there I still find so many dead zones.
 
Androider - 6 hours ago
I'd swear Verizon FIOS is throttling YouTube recently for me, the
quality is getting worse and worse. Constant buffering even at
720p. Forget 4K these days, which used to be perfectly fine a year
ago. With the current FCC I'm afraid it's just going to get worse.
 
  NathanKP - 6 hours ago
  In NYC Verizon has an issue where they haven't purchased enough
  bandwidth into NYC from the Youtube servers.I just turn on my VPN
  (VyperVPN) which has great bandwidth to the YouTube servers and I
  get crystal clear 4K streaming. It's kind of pathetic. I don't
  think they are deliberately throttling, its just that Verizon is
  being cheap and there is plenty of local bandwidth between
  VyperVPN's servers and my home, but not enough bandwidth between
  YouTube's servers and FIOS network in NYC.
 
    tw04 - 6 hours ago
    You've got that backwards.  Verizon is trying to extort Google
    by getting them to pay for interconnects and Google wants
    nothing to do with it.  It's the exact same thing that was
    going on with Comcast and Netflix.  It's complete and utter
    garbage that they continually double dip, and is the EXACT
    reason ISPs shouldn't be allowed to own ANY content.  It's a
    direct conflict of interest.
 
      mrkrabo - 6 hours ago
      Why shouldn't Verizon and Google split the bill?
 
        michaelmrose - 5 hours ago
        Google pays for their own network services.  Whomever
        google pays for network services pays pays if applicable to
        connect to Verizon's network.The sole and only thing they
        are being paid for on the ISP side of Verizon's operation
        is to quickly and reliably deliver the content people want
        to consume over the pipe people have paid to have
        installed.YouTube by hosting content people want to consume
        is driving demand for Verizon's services.Pretending that
        this is a cost is a bazaar inversion of reality.
 
          jessaustin - 2 hours ago
            s/bazaar/bizarre/
 
          criddell - 3 hours ago
          > Google pays for their own network services.Do they? Who
          do they pay? I thought that maybe one of the reasons
          Google got into the ISP business was to be a peer with
          the other big networks and not pay any peerage fees.Does
          Verizon pay for network services?
 
        mrighele - 5 hours ago
        Because Verizon's users are already footing the whole bill.
        If anything, the bill should be split between the end user
        and Google.
 
        jmuguy - 6 hours ago
        My understanding is that its not an issue of the cost to
        "upgrade" the interconnection infrastructure.  That cost is
        likely negligible.  What's happening is that VZ is refusing
        to do it, and allowing service to degrade, unless Google
        pays X.  So yeah, basically extortion.  Google has already
        paid for bandwidth, and this is traffic that VZ's paying
        customers are requesting.
 
          jerkstate - 5 hours ago
          let's do a little math..the router ports on both sides,
          let's say you are using 4 ports across 4 fully loaded
          nexus 9508 (let's call those $500k per incl. optics, so
          $2M / 384 x 4 ports / 36 months = $600/port/month x 4 =
          $2400/4-ports/month)Depending on how the connection
          between the two worked or was paid for, it could be
          $1000-$20000 for 2 pairs of fiber per month depending on
          distance. Let's take a middle of the road $10k average
          cost.So for 10Gbps peak redundant capacity, you are at
          $12,400 per month. Netflix 4k stream is about 16
          megabits, so you can fit 625 4k streams in $12,400 of
          cross-connect capacity. If you don't share costs, that's
          about $20 per user to support Netflix's business model
          that people seem to think it's Comcast's responsibility
          to pay. That's not even considering Comcast's last mile
          distribution cost or paying any salaries.Streaming video
          services soak up a lot of network resources and putting
          all of the cost on ISPs is going to increase your ISP's
          cost and price. How many low-income families do you think
          would lose broadband if it went from $50/mo to $100/mo?
 
          bradleyjg - 5 hours ago
          My ISP keeps on trying to get me to upgrade to "up to"
          100 Mbps service. What in the world do I need that kind
          of bandwidth for except to stream videos? Shouldn't they
          disclose that if I upgrade I can't actually use the
          bandwidth unless the video provider pays them too?
 
          Spivak - 2 hours ago
          That does seem to be a trivial point. You're not going to
          get 100Mbps unless the entire path between the endpoints
          can push that speed.You're getting a 100Mbps connection
          to the edge of their network and they have peering
          agreements, what else should they be doing?
 
          tw04 - 4 hours ago
          Those numbers aren't even close to accurate.  A fully
          loaded nexus 9508 (assuming the 10Gbe ports you listed)
          is ~300k LIST.  I'd be shocked if a company that orders
          as much as Verizon does would pay even half of that.As
          for the "distance" - they are sitting next to each other
          in a data-center.  The distance is likely measured in
          tens of feet and the cost is likely a fixed cost of a
          couple hundred dollars.  The optics on either end if they
          aren't close enough for twinax would add a couple more
          grand.It's also ridiculous to use 36 months as your
          payoff date, they are running equipment a heck of a lot
          longer than that.  The line cards and supervisor modules
          might get swapped out, but I'm willing to bet Verizon
          keeps their chassis level switches for 7-10 years on
          average.So now you're at about 4$ per user to support
          Netflix traffic.
 
          function_seven - 3 hours ago
          Now throw in some standard oversubscription math, and
          you're at 40? per user. 625 simultaneous streams can
          probably serve roughly 6,250 customers, given that half
          the customers don't use Netflix, and the half that do,
          use it at different times of the day.
 
          LukaAl - 4 hours ago
          Hold on a second. Your reasoning has some issues:1) The
          peering happens in Internet exchanges, there's no way a
          peering connection in an Internet Exchange costs 1000$,
          your range is simply ridiculous. Usually, it is fixed
          cost 1K or less depending on the locations of the
          router2) Yes, you have to pay for bandwidth between the
          Exchange and your users. But guess what? That's what your
          users are paying for.3) Not everyone stream movie in 4K
          at the same time. So you could optimize your bandwidth
          usage out of the exchanges. It is called
          "multiplexing".Yes, the rest of the chain could be
          expensive, but that's what your clients are paying for.
          Net neutrality is about transparency. I have no problem
          in understanding that my 40$ connection will perform
          differently than an 80$ one.  But you should compete in
          giving me the best service (where best is best for me,
          not universally) at the lowest price point in a way I
          could easily compare prices.The problem, with my
          statement, is that implies Broadband Internet is a
          commoditized service. And that is all the battle about
          Net Neutrality, ISP doesn't want to act like commodities,
          they don't want to be your P&G or your ConEd. They don't
          have the structure to compete and instead of changing for
          the new market structure, they are fighting back. What
          they are doing is rent seeking. Good for them, bad for
          the economy...
 
          jerkstate - 4 hours ago
          I acknowledge that the costs are ballpark and not exact,
          but I was responding to a post that called the costs
          "negligible" - I was simply trying to quantify a slice of
          the cost and demonstrate that it can be a significant
          fraction of your bill. Of course your bill ALSO pays for
          the last mile infrastructure and connectivity to the
          hundreds of thousands of other routes carried on the
          internet. But it's clarifying to see that the data
          interchange component, which people are calling
          "negligible" actually is a significant portion of the
          cost.My numbers have been called ridiculous by a couple
          of people now but they are based in personal experience,
          albeit a few years old, and nobody has posted any other
          cost breakdowns that demonstrate an understanding of the
          industry and the costs involved, just "those numbers seem
          really high!"The difference between bandwidth and power
          is that data is NOT a commodity like power is, power is
          fungible and can be drawn and combined from a number of
          sources to fulfill the demand, but the dilemma with ISP
          bandwidth is that in order to satisfy customers the ISP
          must ensure adequate bandwidth to each individual content
          provider, and this is a much harder problem.
 
          michaelmrose - 3 hours ago
          The problem is your numbers are terribly wrong in
          multiple ways. I don't think people have mentioned that
          not every subscriber is online simultaneously or that
          most are still watching 1080p.
 
          jerkstate - 2 hours ago
          Your argument is at least as wrong as mine, though, while
          you seek to reduce the numbers, you are not also seeking
          to increase the scope of the cost from JUST the hardware
          depreciation and monthly fiber cost of the interconnect
          to the actual cost of the interconnect. The point is,
          it's not even close to "negligible"
 
          FireBeyond - 3 minutes ago
          Not to mention if you're saturating a 10gbps connection,
          Netflix will throw as many OpenConnect appliances at you
          as you'd like. Yes, they're not "free" when you factor in
          racking, etc, but local bandwidth is cheaper than
          peering, even factoring in your valid comments here.
 
          FireBeyond - 4 minutes ago
          > that people seem to think it's Comcast's responsibility
          to payFunny, the upwards of $50 to $200 I pay Comcast per
          month should go somewhat to that.Besides, how many users
          are streaming 4K content, on what little 4K content
          Netflix has (I'm going to wager that we're looking at
          about 5% or less).At 5mbps for 1080p, peak, now we're at
          2,000 users, and $6/month.Is it really that onerous for
          most users of Comcast to expect that $6 of their say
          $60/mo cable bill goes to Netflix?I'm also not sure why
          you're populating 4 ports and then only talking about 1
          10Gbps connection, when in reality (though I'm no
          expert), that's probably 4 10Gbps connections. Accounting
          for the cost of 4 populated running ports and then only
          talking about the capacity of 1 of those ports when
          calculating cost/megabit seems misleading.
 
          michaelmrose - 5 hours ago
          Back in reality the huge ISP's provide network services
          at a huge premium and make a very substantial profit.  If
          we cared about providing affordable service to low income
          families we would let municipalities sell access to
          existing fiber networks not trying to prop up an industry
          providing bad service at monopoly prices.Your numbers are
          like historical fiction based on reality but not an
          accurate portrayal.  Do you work for verizon or comcast?
 
          jerkstate - 5 hours ago
          Right, and Netflix and Youtube are charities, give me a
          break with that argument.since you INSISTED, I have no
          personal interest in any ISPIf you're going to refute my
          numbers please provide your own.
 
          michaelmrose - 4 hours ago
          Source your numbers.  Most specifically that netflix
          which can provide the entirety of its service for 10 per
          subscriber actually costs providers $20 per subscriber.
 
          [deleted]
 
          mikeash - 5 hours ago
          That's not $20/user to support Netflix's business model,
          that's $20/user to support Comcast's customers' usage
          model.If you think this is unfair, then the answer is to
          get rid of bullshit "unlimited [but not really]"
          connections and charge people based on what they use.
          Stop making low-impact users subsidize people who stream
          HD movies 24/7.
 
          [deleted]
 
          shuntress - 4 hours ago
          >that's about $20 per user to support Netflix's business
          model that people seem to think it's Comcast's
          responsibility to pay.So what is my $80/mo Comcast
          Internet Service supposed to be buying me?
 
          LanceH - 3 hours ago
          Lobbying.Seriously, though, could someone do a traceroute
          and tells me who pays for each hop?
 
          wmf - 2 hours ago
          Basically you (the customer) pay for the last mile and
          Netflix is getting extorted into paying for the rest.
 
          Spivak - 2 hours ago
          Not just the last mile but the peering agreements that
          your last-mile ISP has with either a backbone provider
          and/or other networks.
 
          jerkstate - 2 hours ago
          Telecom and Internet lobbying aren't all that different: 
          https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/indusclient.php?id=B09&
          yea... https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/indusclient.php?
          id=B13&yea...Alphabet spends more on lobbying than
          Comcast.
 
          web007 - 4 hours ago
          It's not Comcast's responsibility to support someone
          else's business model.It's also not Netflix's
          responsibility to support Comcast's business model if
          they can't afford to provide bandwidth that customers
          desire and are allowed.It's Comcast's responsibility to
          support their advertised usage sufficiently. If they say
          that they support 100mbps then I should be able to get
          100mbps from wherever I like. They're going to have to
          pay for that uplink somewhere, whether it's Netflix or
          Google or Zayo or Level3 or whoever.
 
          jerkstate - 2 hours ago
          I agree, this is the crux of the argument. Broadband ISPs
          have been guilty of this for some time. Mobile players
          are generally getting a little more leeway by capping
          total transfer per month and not talking about rates as
          much. And T-mobile's "Binge On" product has been mostly
          hailed as pro-consumer, even though it does shape video
          down to SD bitrates and is a direct violation of the
          "paid prioritization" tenet of net neutrality as
          described in FCC's directive.
 
          FireBeyond - 1 minutes ago
          >  If they say that they support 100mbps then I should be
          able to get 100mbps from wherever I like.Precisely. Not
          "from wherever we've got a 'preferred' agreement or
          kickback only".
 
          Karunamon - 5 hours ago
          That's assuming that we're talking a connection streaming
          a video from Netflix's CDN to the customer's device. When
          in reality, Netflix offered to put a CDN cache box in
          Comcast's DC which would largely reduce the problem,
          Comcast turned them down.That, alone, tells me that this
          is not a congestion or a cost problem, it is a bull-
          headedness for the purpose of rent seeking problem.And as
          to the "last mile" costs, those are what Comcast
          subscribers are paying Comcast for. They act like this
          traffic is unsolicited noise, when in reality it's why
          they're being paid anything by anyone. I say don't charge
          people for x megabits down if you don't intend on them
          using it.
 
          jerkstate - 5 hours ago
          My understanding is that Comcast offered Netflix
          commercially reasonable terms for colo and cross-connect
          and Netflix opted for public interconnect via an
          exchange, which alleviated the bandwidth constraints
          caused by Cogent taking Netflix's money and then refusing
          to comply with their cost-sharing peering agreement with
          Comcast. Calling the Netflix CDN boxes "free" is totally
          misleading because Comcast would still need to pay for
          the router ports to carry the traffic internally, space &
          power, and management assistance. That deal works for a
          small ISP that pays for most of its bandwidth but not a
          large ISP that uses significant amounts of shared-cost
          peering. If Comcast is required to host those boxes "for
          free" what of every other CDN that they previously had
          agreements with?I agree that Comcast marketing "up to X
          megabits" is misleading and those chickens have come home
          to roost with people thinking that their last mile means
          they should get that speed to every point on the Internet
          24 hours a day. I have been negotiating commercial
          bandwidth agreements for years and even from a tier 1 you
          can't get that guarantee in a contract.
 
          Karunamon - 4 hours ago
          Calling the Netflix CDN boxes "free" is totally
          misleading because Comcast would still need to pay for
          the router ports to carry the traffic internally, space &
          power, and management assistance.Which is still less than
          the cost of doing a proper interconnect - they chose
          instead to let it degrade and play semantic games
          instead. It also puts the lie to their complaint that it
          was ever about congestion. The correct response to people
          requesting a lot of traffic from X is to ensure that
          traffic is delivered efficiently. That is why their
          customers pay them.
 
          mrkrabo - 6 hours ago
          That's what splitting the bill means.You don't pay "for
          the bandwidth", you pay for a link between two ISPs
          (Google and Verizon). The bill between then should be
          split, otherwise the traffic will have to pass through
          somewhere else, and that will cause congestion problems.
 
          jmuguy - 5 hours ago
          Google has most certainly paid for bandwidth/traffic from
          their end.  Whether that's to a CDN or some other
          arrangement, and there's likely already peering
          agreements in place.   In these cases what Verizon is
          doing is asking for money above and beyond what it
          actually costs to handle the interconnection.   They use
          declining service to their own customers as leverage.
          Its ridiculous, and even more worrying when you see ISPs
          and content providers merging as is the case with VZ
          buying Yahoo and AOL, Comcast and NBC merger, etc.
 
        mtgx - 4 hours ago
        Only Google and Verizon? Top 10 content providers? Top 50?
        top 100? Who would set the rankings? Should everyone split
        the bill with Verizon?
 
        raisedbyninjas - 6 hours ago
        In a way, they used to. Peering agreements between large
        networks allow unbilled traffic from either party with the
        understanding that both would be serving and consuming
        similar amounts of traffic. With the emergence of the
        network neutrality debate ISPs have claimed that peering
        agreements are not appropriate because content providers
        "send" more traffic than they receive. This of course
        ignores the fact that their customers are requesting the
        traffic and their whole business model is designed on
        asymetric traffic.
 
          function_seven - 3 hours ago
          > This of course ignores the fact that their customers
          are requesting the traffic and their whole business model
          is designed on asymetric traffic.Exactly. If the Internet
          worked on this model?where the recipient of the net
          imbalance was paid money for it?I'd get a check from
          Verizon each month instead of a bill!
 
          toast0 - 3 hours ago
          Peering disputes have always been when the party wanting
          to peer had an unbalanced traffic ratio, and the other
          party didn't want to peer (possibly for other reasons),
          and they started much earlier than the network neutrality
          debates.The recent changes are more around who is
          involved in the peering disputes. It used to be smaller
          ISPs trying to get peering with larger ISPs, such as
          Cogent trying to get peering with [name your favorite, or
          PSINet vs Cable and Wireless; and most often the ISP
          refusing to peer didn't have residential customers
          themselves. Now it's more often the content providers
          themselves trying to peer with the residential isps
          directly. A major factor here is the huge consolidation
          of residential ISPs, but also the consolidation of
          content providers.Consolidation of residential ISPs means
          each ISP is big enough to run their own backbone, and as
          a result they can credibly have strict peering
          requirements. Smaller, regional ISPs will tend to want to
          peer, because otherwise the traffic will come through on
          paid transit connections. Large ISPs may not care;
          because of their size, they may not be paying anyone for
          transit, and because of the common asymmetric nature of
          residential connections, there's not likely to be many
          networks where the large ISP is on the wrong side of the
          ratio.If I were one of these content providers, I would
          spend a lot more time messing with the large ISPs. Figure
          out how to make the traffic cost them money, so they'll
          want to peer. Provide transit to data backup services to
          try to make the ratios less unbalanced. Run campaigns
          suggesting that residential ISPs should be paying their
          customers, given that the traffic is unbalanced. Etc.
 
          thanksgiving - 2 hours ago
          > Peering disputes have always been when the party
          wanting to peer had an unbalanced traffic ratio, and the
          other party didn't want to peer (possibly for other
          reasons), and they started much earlier than the network
          neutrality debates. The recent changes are more around
          who is involved in the peering disputes. It used to be
          smaller ISPs trying to get peering with larger ISPs, such
          as Cogent trying to get peering with [name your favorite,
          or PSINet vs Cable and Wireless; and most often the ISP
          refusing to peer didn't have residential customers
          themselves. Now it's more often the content providers
          themselves trying to peer with the residential isps
          directly. A major factor here is the huge consolidation
          of residential ISPs, but also the consolidation of
          content providers.> Consolidation of residential ISPs
          means each ISP is big enough to run their own backbone,
          and as a result they can credibly have strict peering
          requirements. Smaller, regional ISPs will tend to want to
          peer, because otherwise the traffic will come through on
          paid transit connections. Large ISPs may not care;
          because of their size, they may not be paying anyone for
          transit, and because of the common asymmetric nature of
          residential connections, there's not likely to be many
          networks where the large ISP is on the wrong side of the
          ratio.> If I were one of these content providers, I would
          spend a lot more time messing with the large ISPs. Figure
          out how to make the traffic cost them money, so they'll
          want to peer. Provide transit to data backup services to
          try to make the ratios less unbalanced. Run campaigns
          suggesting that residential ISPs should be paying their
          customers, given that the traffic is unbalanced. Etc.I
          can upload all my files to Google Drive and all my photos
          and videos to Google Photos if you think it helps the
          ratio...
 
          jessaustin - 2 hours ago
          I've long thought the Netflix app should simply upload
          random noise, to "balance out" the tremendous
          download/upload difference with which some poor ISPs
          struggle so.
 
      Androider - 6 hours ago
      Google should instead throw a couple more billions at the
      SpaceX mesh Internet satellite project, bypassing these
      asshats completely once and for all. I'd switch in a
      heartbeat, even if it was a bit more expensive.
 
        Orangeair - 3 hours ago
        Satellite is nice, but it's not a solution for every use
        case. Specifically, it's not great for anything that
        requires low latency (like gaming).
 
          Androider - 2 hours ago
          The proposed SpaceX satellite network is in low earth
          orbit unlike traditional satellite Internet, so it should
          provide decent latencies (25ms vs
          600+ms):https://arstechnica.com/information-
          technology/2016/11/space...
 
        jerkstate - 6 hours ago
        surely once google runs the pipes they'll be incentivized
        to pay for netflix's traffic on both sides, or maybe we'll
        just be back to square 1..
 
          tw04 - 4 hours ago
          Unlikely.  Even if Google were to go hard into the video
          space (unlikely but not impossible), they still wouldn't
          benefit from throttling/capping.  It would just give
          users a reason to go back to their original providers.
          Furthermore we've already seen the governmental backlash
          when facebook tried similar in developing nations.*I
          should clarify when I say "the video space" I mean
          original AAA content like Netflix is doing.  I could be
          underestimating them but that's a LONG way from their
          market sweet spot.
 
        matt4077 - 58 minutes ago
        If only there were a legal solution for such problems,
        something that any sane person would consider obvious. We
        could solve it by tomorrow 6pm, without a single satellite
        launch.
 
      AndrewKemendo - 1 hours ago
      Verizon is trying to extort Google by getting them to pay for
      interconnects and Google wants nothing to do with it.I don't
      think that's right.At its most basic, an interconnection
      agreement says ?You carry some traffic for me, in return for
      which I?ll do something?either carry traffic for you, or pay
      you, or some combination of the two.?With Netflix and Google,
      both were basically saying, "we're not going to pay you
      (Comcast/Verizon) for access to your network, because we're
      important enough that we shouldn't have to." They don't have
      their own ISP networks to exchange traffic at the same rate,
      all they have is their services, so they don't have anything
      to offer the ISP in return.So it's disingenuous to say that
      service providers (Google, Netflix), are extorting anyone.
      They don't see themselves as ISPs, but they are setting up
      their own interconnects to provide faster access to
      customers, so they assume they are exempt from what were
      traditionally informal interconnect rules.[1]http://www.inter
      isle.net/sub/ISP%20Interconnection.pdf
 
        FireBeyond - 12 minutes ago
        And yet ISPs happily provide vastly asymmetric pipes to the
        end user, ergo they're _physically incapable_ of playing
        the peering game in fair sense of the word either.But they
        still want to enforce those "agreements"... when it suits
        them.
 
        kuschku - 1 hours ago
        This is breaking a major concept of the internet. You pay
        for peering ports, not for bandwidth.
 
          kbenson - 1 hours ago
          That's somewhat simplistic.  Peering that's somewhat one-
          sided can have fees built into one side.  Still, getting
          a large chunk of your content quicker and without
          overloading your other peers or upstreams means that
          Netflix and the like should have the power here, and if
          they desired could charge for this better access (it is
          one-sided, as mentioned before).  It's totally backwards
          that Comcast/Verizon would be throttling them instead,
          and is only possible because they don't really compete in
          a fully open market.
 
        kbenson - 1 hours ago
        > So it's disingenuous to say that service providers
        (Google, Netflix), are extorting anyone.I don't think
        anyone was saying that.> With Netflix and Google, both were
        basically saying, "we're not going to pay you
        (Comcast/Verizon) for access to your network, because we're
        important enough that we shouldn't have to." They don't
        have their own ISP networks to exchange traffic at the same
        rate, all they have is their services, so they don't have
        anything to offer the ISP in return.Generally peering
        agreements work on total bandwidth and generally you try to
        make it as balanced as possible, so there's no cost to
        either side, as traffic may traverse your network from the
        peer but not terminate there (it continues through another
        peer), and that's just a load you bear, but the other side
        has the same risk.For an end service peering, that's not
        really as much of a risk, to my knowledge, so what you have
        is purely a win-win, where Netflix delivers content
        directly to your network so it's quicker, and you aren't
        using up peer bandwidth and backbone connections to serve
        that same content.  In any market where Comcast/Verizon
        didn't have near monopolies over large areas, Netflix could
        easily charge for this access given their size and
        ubiquity.  That some large ISPs are actually throttling the
        content only highlights the perverse incentives at play.
 
        [deleted]
 
    bogomipz - 5 hours ago
    They don't need to purchase bandwidth, Youtube is available via
    public peering exchanges. The way these generally work is you
    just pay for the port on the switch at the exchange and traffic
    directly. See:https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/15169Youtube is
    available via public peering at the Equinix Internet Exchange
    New York:https://www.peeringdb.com/ix/12Purchasing a port on
    public peering fabric isn't the same as buying bandwidth from a
    transit provider. It's a great way to get traffic to your users
    much cheaper than you could via transit which is why people do
    it. The issue is eyeball networks - Comcast, FIOS, Time Warner
    etc. may choose not to do so because they went to seek rent in
    the form of "paid peering" from these same content providers
    that their users paid them to get access to in the first place.
 
  mallaidh - 6 hours ago
  That's exactly what they're doing: http://www.businessinsider.com
  /verizon-netflix-youtube-throt...
 
  nfriedly - 6 hours ago
  If you configured an alternative DNS provider, such as Google
  Public DNS or OpenDNS, that could possibility cause something
  like that.Or maybe they are throttling it...
 
    JshWright - 6 hours ago
    How would an 'alternative DNS provider' (also known as a 'DNS
    provider') cause streaming video to buffer?
 
      jlgaddis - 5 hours ago
      Let's say you live in NYC but you're using a DNS server
      (resolver) in Seattle.  When your client performs a DNS
      query, you may get a response that directs you to a
      server/CDN/whatever in or near Seattle as opposed to one
      closer to you in NYC.  Then, the data (streaming video) is
      traversing the country to get to you, passing through many
      more (potentially congested) interconnects/links on the
      way.Reality is a bit more complicated than this simple
      example but such an issue is certainly not unheard of (and
      inspired mitigations such as RFC7871, for example).
 
        JshWright - 5 hours ago
        Both Google and OpenDNS use anycast addresses for their DNS
        servers that are very likely to route though a 'local'
        server. I think ISP games are far more likely to be the
        root cause here...
 
          notyourday - 3 hours ago
          Google DNS requests enter Google network in multiple
          places. DNS itself is not served from the edges.
 
  shados - 4 hours ago
  I used to have FiOS is one of the few places in Cambridge that
  offered it.It was the first time in my life that I'd been wishing
  for Comcast. 320p videos could barely load, and the lag in
  certain MMORPGs was unplayable (we're talking 500-1000ms
  delays)It got better after a while, but google had some stats by
  ISP for Youtube, and FiOS in my area was like 1/10th of the speed
  of Comcast on average.
 
  zippergz - 4 hours ago
  It's probably a coincidence, but just this weekend for the first
  time ever, I noticed my YouTube streaming at visibly lower
  quality (my provider is Cox). It happened all weekened,
  intermittently. Nothing else seemed slow, and numerous speed
  tests (both from official "speed test" sites including Netflix's
  own Fast.com, and by moving large files between my network and
  AWS) all showed well over 100Mbps. I don't know if it was being
  throttled somewhere, Netflix's service was overloaded, or if
  there was some other weird problem happening on my network that
  affected Netflix and nothing else. But it was bad enough that my
  wife who is usually oblivious to audio/video quality actually
  brought it up.
 
  deagle50 - 2 hours ago
  +1. Youtube was terrible the past week and I have 100/100  FIOS
  with speed tests exceeding that.Google needs to take gloves off.
 
  chasing - 3 hours ago
  This is the downside of not being network neutral for companies
  like Verizon:Now Verizon gets the blame if something's slow.
 
  knowaveragejoe - 6 hours ago
  I've had a similar experience recently as well. I pay for
  150/150, yet youtube seems routinely slow.
 
  wil421 - 5 hours ago
  I have a similar issue with AT&T fiber. YouTube is terrible and
  streams at sub 480 but if I jump on my VPN it streams at 1080p
  within a second.
 
    Spivak - 2 hours ago
    So are you accusing them of malicious throttling or that they
    just have bad peering agreements that configuring a different
    network path ends up being faster?
 
      wil421 - 1 hours ago
      Is there a difference between the two? See my other comment.
      I'm suggesting they have bad peering agreements and choose
      not to do anything about it. Most likely they are waiting to
      extract money from YouTube. Seems like net neutrality is in
      question again.
 
    ryandrake - 4 hours ago
    Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but how would the ISP
    take a 1080p stream and downsample it to 480 on the fly,
    without man-in-the-middling HTTPS?
 
      jdmichal - 4 hours ago
      They don't. HTTPS doesn't hide who the connection is to. How
      would a network route packets if it didn't know the
      recipient?Once they know you're connected to Youtube, they
      just limit the bandwidth on that connection. The Youtube
      video player will detect this and automatically downgrade to
      a lower quality until it finds one that fits within the
      bandwidth profile. Netflix does the same thing, which is why
      after buffering sometimes the video looks like crap and then
      gets better after 15 seconds or so. It buffered a lower
      quality until it figured out it could send higher quality
      again.EDIT: I should add, this is why VPNs are sometimes used
      as a "solution" to such bandwidth shaping. You are hiding the
      true recipient by purposefully man-in-the-middling the
      connection with a peer you (hopefully) trust. VPNs are also
      popular for connecting with business networks, so it's
      generally not "safe" for the ISP to shape bandwidth to any
      VPN as aggressively.
 
        ryandrake - 3 hours ago
        > The Youtube video player will detect this and
        automatically downgrade to a lower quality until it finds
        one that fits within the bandwidth profileAhh, this is the
        key point I missed, thanks. So it's a problem with the
        video player itself trying to "decide" for you the quality
        you want. Couldn't this be worked around with things like
        youtube-dl?
 
          wil421 - 3 hours ago
          The other poster has already pointed out the correct
          answer. Other users are reporting the same issue on the
          AT&T forums[1] and on DSLreports.I'd imagine this is due
          to politics and AT&T betting net neutrality will go away.
          Once YouTube forks over money a peering point will be
          upgraded.[1]https://forums.att.com/t5/AT-T-Fiber-
          Equipment/Gigapower-You...
 
          rmc - 3 hours ago
          The video player deciding what quality you want is a good
          thing. The user wants to watch a video live, as it goes.
          You don't want to be interuppted every 30 seconds with a
          "buffering" message, or wait 10 minutes at the start for
          it to entirely download.Youtube-dl would probably work,
          because it will would download the high quality video as
          a file, and your ISP would make the download take longer
          than the video.
 
knowaveragejoe - 6 hours ago
Silence from the opponents to NN.
 
  falcolas - 6 hours ago
  Not to say this is good - but mobile traffic has always been
  exempted from the proposed NN rules from the FCC.
 
    knowaveragejoe - 6 hours ago
    That's a fair point. In a larger sense I don't see what
    difference it makes, but has less to do with NN than I thought.
 
      callalex - 4 hours ago
      The main difference is the lack of a natural monopoly for
      wireless isps. Switching providers is actually possible so if
      you disagree with your providers throttling you have other
      options, unlike in the cable industry.
 
timmaah - 6 hours ago
I might be all for it if it frees up some bandwidth for the rest of
us.I travel full-time and quite a few places lately the Verizon
tower is obviously at capacity. (Strong signal.. slow speeds)
 
  MichaelGG - 6 hours ago
  Limiting Netflix is a poor way to approach that; they should
  instead be limiting users on the tower, dividing up the bandwidth
  there, regardless of what you're accessing. If capping flows at
  10M helps, then they should apply it to everyone.
 
    tedunangst - 5 hours ago
    It's a little more complicated than that. If I click a link to
    an article on medium, I want 100Mbps to download it, but then
    I'm going to spend some time reading it, freeing bandwidth for
    others. There are all sorts of token bucket algorithms one can
    use, but like I said, a little more complicated. Identifying
    popular streaming services and ratelimiting them might be
    easier than tracking traffic usage per user per minute. And
    sometimes it's ok to let users download at peak speeds for more
    than a web page or two at a time. Maybe I download a new ubuntu
    ISO, which is a couple gigs and takes a while. I don't do that
    everyday, so the impact is minimal. It's not just that
    streaming video is high bandwidth, it's also very popular, and
    frequent, and long duration.Ideally, we might offer users a
    baseline of 10Mbps all the time, and some quota of 100GB at
    100Mbps regardless of source, and then people can choose what
    they want to download fast, but I think this would be a UX
    disaster.
 
      shuntress - 3 hours ago
      If I'm going to watch a show on Netflix, I want 100Mps to
      download it, but then I'm going to spend some time watching
      it, freeing bandwidth for others.
 
      wmf - 4 hours ago
      This is a key issue. Do we want slightly more complex (per-
      customer fair queueing) equipment that is demonstrably fair
      or do we want fast and cheap kludges that are prone to abuse
      but trust us we swear they won't be used for evil?
 
      ant6n - 4 hours ago
      I don't get how 10mb/s is so much more complicated than
      100mb/10s.
 
        tedunangst - 1 hours ago
        In the particular case of something like Netflix, starting
        an HD stream then stalling and re buffering an SD stream
        might be a shittier user experience. How much data does
        Netflix download to measure bandwidth and for how long?
 
  PissedWhovian - 6 hours ago
  Just curious - Why do you assume that's due to congestion and not
  to the same type of intentional throttling being discussed here?
 
    timmaah - 5 hours ago
    The speed will decrease during periods you'd think there would
    be heavy usage (mid morning/late afternoon, even slower in
    early evening). Then speed up dramatically in the late evening
    when most have gone to bed.
 
      dboreham - 5 hours ago
      fwiw I see the same congestion-related throughput pattern on
      my copper cableco connection (fast.com reports much lower
      numbers in the evening and on the weekend vs early in the
      morning on a weekday). Typically I can still get full speed
      from my own servers though, implying the congestion is
      specific to the peering between my ISP and Netflix CDN nodes.
 
cprayingmantis - 1 hours ago
They're going to keep doing this too until customers start treating
internet as a right and utility until then it's just seen as a
commodity.If your local grocery monopoly started rationing out milk
to 250ml sold per day there would be protests, investigations, and
10 minute time blocks for it on the nightly news because the people
would demand it. The internet just hasn't had this moment yet and
it sucks because the momentum for this moment is building but it
hasn't reached critical mass. I don't think this moment will happen
for another decade at least.
 
  tuna-piano - 14 minutes ago
  A utility is generally considered a monopoly - there is usually
  only one wire leading to your house.I can choose Sprint,
  T-mobile, Verizon or ATT.What monopoly are you speaking of?
 
    ropiku - 4 minutes ago
    But if you're in a longer term contract you're out of luck for
    a while. If they are allowed to change the service then they
    must allow customers to switch providers without exit fee.
 
    slackingoff2017 - 3 minutes ago
    Ah yes, a single example is more than enough to override the
    mountains of evidence that the majority of Americans only have
    a single choice of internet provider.Power is setup the same
    way in some states, where multiple companies share the wires.
    This is only because the government demands the wires be shared
    fairly. Its an interesting arrangement, essentially a regulated
    monopoly called a utility.
 
  akira2501 - 51 minutes ago
  > If your local grocery monopoly started rationing out milk to
  250ml sold per day there would be protestsNot quite..  if they
  rationed milk to 250mL,  but then let you buy an extra 25mL for
  what the first 250mL costs.  They're not only creating scarcity,
  but then creating a market to profit from this artificial
  situation.
 
    QAPereo - 45 minutes ago
    They'd literally be lynched.
 
    hammock - 40 minutes ago
    Don't airlines do this too? You can buy the first ten tickets
    on a given plane for the same price that you would pay for the
    very last available ticket. Don't see anyone getting lynched in
    that industry.
 
      redial - 31 minutes ago
      This is the important part,> They're not only creating
      scarcity, but then creating a market to profit from this
      artificial situation.Seats on a plane are a limited resource.
 
        hueving - 25 minutes ago
        So is bandwidth though. I'm not sure where the idea comes
        from that ISPs have unlimited bandwidth.
 
          revelation - 19 minutes ago
          ISPs have profited massively from many many Moore
          iterations while consumer bandwidth is stuck on below
          1990 technology.Make no mistake, the technical side of
          this has only gotten cheaper. That's before you consider
          the "investment" necessary to resolve the vast majority
          of Netflix bandwidth issues is connecting a cable from
          one router to another in a CIX.Of course when you do that
          it becomes blatantly obvious that ISPs have oversold and
          overbooked capacity dramatically as we get closer and
          closer to the last mile to the customer. Now they don't
          want to pay up to actually provide what they have sold.
 
  wtf_is_up - 37 minutes ago
  Where is there a local grocery monopoly? I grew up in just about
  the most rural part of WV and we had several grocery options to
  choose from within a reasonable area.
 
mrkrabo - 6 hours ago
People streaming HD video from cell towers is simply crazy. I'm
sure that even supporters of net neutrality understand that a
solution must be found.Caps can't help with that in highly
populated areas. The radio spectrum is simply finite. It's physics.
 
  kobeya - 6 hours ago
  More cell towers and more spectrum allocations?Japan seems to be
  doing just fine with high density, high bandwidth mobile usage.
 
    user5994461 - 6 hours ago
    There isn't more spectrum to be allocated.In layman terms, the
    air around you is limited and there can't be more of it.
 
      CogitoCogito - 6 hours ago
      Spectrum can be re-allocated.Regardless, the first of his two
      points still applies:> More cell towers
 
        user5994461 - 5 hours ago
        The spectrum is highly limited, irrelevant of
        (re)allocation.In layman terms, better allocating the air
        around you will not create more air.
 
          ss248 - 4 hours ago
          Can you stop with this "in layman terms"?Let's just take
          a look at radio spectrum in US [1].Right now you are
          trying to say, that everything there is completely
          saturated 100% of the time? That is simply false.[1] http
          s://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/United_S.
          ..
 
          user5994461 - 3 hours ago
          I already know that diagram, that's my job.Yes, the
          usable frequencies are saturated.
 
          ss248 - 3 hours ago
          Define "usable frequencies". You are making pretty
          ridiculous sounding claims btw. I would rather believe
          that we can max out cell tower wired connection
          bandwidth, than completely saturate radio frequencies.
          Obvious solution, as non-professional, is to use more
          towers/higher frequencies. Give more information, if you
          want people to believe you. Go technical and say how
          things really are, no need for that "layman" stuff.
 
      shuntress - 3 hours ago
      In layman terms, if we built domes and increased the pressure
      slightly by pumping in more air then we would have increased
      the amount of air around us and raised the limit on how much
      air we have to allocate.
 
  mvid - 6 hours ago
  Improve the infrastructure.
 
    jrs95 - 6 hours ago
    But is forcing infrastructure upgrades via legislation really
    going to be a value add for the economy? Is hi def video
    streaming really that important?
 
      eddieroger - 3 hours ago
      Why force it by legislation? Verizon could instead let the
      infra sit stagnant and overpopulated, and watch all of it's
      customers go to another carrier who upgrades their network to
      handle the traffic. The market can handle this just fine. All
      those in favor of net neutrality just want the carriers to be
      forced to treat bits like bits, not some bits being more
      special than other bits. Common carrier doesn't force infra
      expansion.
 
      tw04 - 6 hours ago
      Hi def isn't, but expansion is.  Our economy is based on
      growth.Is it really a value add for the economy for Verizon
      to turn a higher profit which they funnel to their
      executives?  Or do you think that money would be better spent
      buying infrastructure which requires thousands of jobs to
      build?
 
        ryandrake - 4 hours ago
        It's a value add for those executives. Think about who's
        calling the shots.
 
  s73ver - 5 hours ago
  "People streaming HD video from cell towers is simply crazy."Why?
 
    shuntress - 3 hours ago
    Just want to point out to sibling comments that "The cell
    towers cannot support the requested bandwidth" was the argument
    used to prevent companies from making phones with full web
    browsers.
 
    timmaah - 5 hours ago
    The towers don't have enough capacity in a number of places.
    Thus a few degrade the performance for the rest.
 
    dboreham - 5 hours ago
    Cell data service can't support the throughput required (due to
    limits of physics rather than lack of smartness or money from
    the telcoms).
 
  KMag - 6 hours ago
  > People streaming HD video from cell towers is simply crazy.Most
  people aren't objecting to rationing, per say.  (Though,
  misleading advertising of available bandwidth does lead to
  disappointed customers.)What most are objecting to is unequal
  provisioning of bandwidth.  This incentivizes users to use a VPN
  (doubling aggregate bandwidth consumption) or use steganography
  to make the traffic look like voice calls (at significant
  reduction in transfer efficiency).Everyone would benefit if
  service providers rolled out provisioning that incentivized
  application programmers to truthfully mark traffic using QoS /
  ToS ... unlimited bandwidth at lowest priority, limited bandwidth
  if low latency is required.Instead, they're doing the exact
  opposite... encouraging P2P developers to encrypt the traffic and
  then use the ciphertext bitstream to drive an Nth order Markov
  model that makes it look like compressed voice or HTTP traffic...
  sort of LZMA in reverse.  It becomes a cat-and-mouse game where
  even the cat loses in the end.
 
    problems - 5 hours ago
    > Everyone would benefit if service providers rolled out
    provisioning that incentivized application programmers to
    truthfully mark traffic using QoS / ToS ... unlimited bandwidth
    at lowest priority, limited bandwidth if low latency is
    required.So what you're saying is, I can run a few iptables
    rules on my phone and prioritize all my traffic ahead of
    everyone else's? Sweet.QoS in a LAN is fine, QoS using
    untrusted devices just plain doesn't work.
 
      KMag - 4 hours ago
      By all means, have a great time with your high priority 56
      kbps, you amazing haXX0r, you, while my background phone app
      install gets wildly swinging bandwidth between 0 and 2 Mbps,
      averaging 750 kbps.  That's the reduced bandwidth portion of
      my comment.  Give the application the ability to make
      explicit bandwidth vs. latency tradeoff decisions, or at
      least hints, that the routers otherwise need to make via
      heuristics.
 
  tw04 - 6 hours ago
  Sure there is, it just wouldn't fly here.  It's the same solution
  to the last-mile problem.  You stop carving up the spectrum into
  tiny chunks.  Government owns the tower and all spectrum coming
  out of it, runs the fiber back to a central pop, cellphone
  carriers tie into that pop and route traffic appropriately - (the
  access is sold on a per-tower basis to recoup the costs).  Lowers
  the barrier to entry for new providers and should create actual
  competition based on services instead of based on who has the
  most money to buy up and sit on spectrum.The only reason we even
  have real competition at this point is because the FCC blocked
  AT&T's acquisition of tmo.  That NEVER would've been blocked in
  our current climate.
 
holtalanm - 5 hours ago
and so it begins.
 
  egwynn - 5 hours ago
  Begins? Wasn?t Comcast?s throttling of BitTorrent connections ten
  years ago more like the ?beginning??
 
    holtalanm - 1 hours ago
    Well, yeah.   But that ended with Net Neutrality.  Now we will
    see a while new wave of companies either secretly or openly
    defying Net Neutrality while the FCC's power is gutted by our
    government.Oh, but our elected representatives totally have our
    best interest at heart /s
 
pxeboot - 6 hours ago
What were they testing? If users would notice the throttling?
 
  rhino369 - 1 hours ago
  Probably testing something like Tmobile's bingeon.  Mobile
  bandwidth is tightly rationed but video providers to a terrible
  job being efficient. It's one of the few legitimate uses of
  throttling IMO.
 
  caspianrunner - 2 hours ago
  I have worked at a mobile ISP before. I don't know what VZW is
  doing here, but there are a few reasons you might run an
  experiment. Most often for me it was to troubleshoot a technical
  issue.To try to get an idea of user behavior we would run
  "experiments" on previously collected data, i.e. rely on natural
  experiments - not change things and then see what happened.In
  every case the experiments I was part of were to see if we could
  improve user throughput, not degrade it.
 
festizio - 6 hours ago
I am more sad reading that T-Mobile and Sprint are potentially
merging.
 
  jrs95 - 6 hours ago
  Why? I'd understand not wanting AT&T or Verizon to buy either of
  them, but I don't see how a T-Mobile & Sprint merger would make
  things much worse. Seems like that would make them a more viable
  3rd alternative to the big two, which is something I'd really
  appreciate. I just went back to Verizon because the service I was
  getting from T-Mobile just wasn't good enough.
 
    Chardok - 5 hours ago
    I can't think of a time where customer experience, user
    experience or overall quality of a company improves after a
    large merger like this. Less choices for the consumer typically
    translate to more power for the companies.
 
    festizio - 40 minutes ago
    I have had all of the major carriers. T-Mobile has given me the
    best customer service and features for a cheaper price than the
    others.
 
    throwaway91111 - 5 hours ago
    They're already viable as they will be. As far as i can tell
    the only reason verizon is doing better is because they use
    CDMA rather than GSM.At&t sucks, though. It's not good that the
    best two providers (in terms of how they treat their customers)
    are merging
 
    JadeNB - 5 hours ago
    > >  I am more sad reading that T-Mobile and Sprint are
    potentially merging.> Why?I am not festizio, but the news makes
    me sad because I find T-Mobile's customer service and stick-it-
    to-the-big-carriers attitude both delightful, and my memories
    of dealing with Sprint (only ever landline, so I have no idea
    of the mobile quality) are terrible.  On the other hand, your
    point:> Seems like that would make them a more viable 3rd
    alternative to the big two, which is something I'd really
    appreciate.seems like a good argument for why it could at least
    be a mixed blessing.
 
  adammunich - 33 minutes ago
  They already license towers from each other. May as well be one
  company on paper too.