GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-19) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Apple Machine Learning Journal
358 points by uptown
https://machinelearning.apple.com/
___________________________________________________________________
 
tedmiston - 7 hours ago
The top comment on Product Hunt from Ryan Hoover raised a good
point about Apple's timing with this:> This launch is particularly
interesting because this isn't typical for Apple, a fairly
secretive and top down company (when it comes to external
communications). Timing makes a lot of sense with their upcoming
launch of ARkit, Apple Home, and the inevitable "Siri 2.0", among
other things.https://www.producthunt.com/posts/apple-machine-
learning-jou...
 
  minimaxir - 7 hours ago
  This blog is not Apple's first blog; they started a Swift blog
  shortly after the release of Swift:
  https://developer.apple.com/swift/blog/
 
    kalleboo - 6 hours ago
    And WebKit has has a blog for 11 years now
    https://webkit.org/blog/4/welcome-to-the-webkit-blog/
 
  ozansener - 7 hours ago
  Isn't there a way simpler timing analysis. The blog post is about
  a conference paper which will be presented in CVPR and the
  conference starts in 2 days.
 
zo7 - 5 hours ago
It's interesting how much criticism they're getting because Apple
formatted their blog to be anonymous and watered down, but they're
clear in their first technical post that it is just an overview of
work that the researchers are presenting at CVPR [1].So the
researchers at Apple are still getting credit for their work in the
scientific community, but the PR-facing side of their work is
anonymous, probably for some aesthetic reason (this is Apple, of
course)[1]: https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.07828
 
plg - 4 hours ago
I like the font. Is is possible/legal to use the SF Pro Text
webfont?PS I know the desktop font is available for download at the
apple developer site ... but I'm talking about the web font
 
mattl - 9 hours ago
What's powering this site? Doesn't look like WebObjects.
 
  RubenSandwich - 8 hours ago
  Looking at the source makes me think they are using a static site
  generator. The CSS looks custom but to be based on Foundation:
  http://foundation.zurb.com/.
 
  tambourine_man - 5 hours ago
  Looks like it's Jekyllhttp://www.manton.org/2017/07/5463.html
 
  tambourine_man - 6 hours ago
  I'd be surprised if they started something new with WebObjects.
  Very.
 
  kennydude - 7 hours ago
  "AppleHttpServer/8b2905f7" is an interesting thing to see
 
  alexkadis - 8 hours ago
  It looks like some Node.js static site generator.- The URL
  structure doesn't seem to be dynamic. For instance,
  https://machinelearning.apple.com/2017/ doesn't give a list of
  all articles from 2017, just a response of "Not found" (at least
  it gives a 404 error, so that's nice).- The js files make
  extensive use of `require()` which is often used by Node.js
  developers http://fredkschott.com/post/2014/06/require-and-the-
  module-s...
 
KKKKkkkk1 - 8 hours ago
Why no author names on the article?
 
  matt4077 - 6 hours ago
  I don't know enough about the culture at Apple, but maybe they're
  going for a sort of "this is a team effort"? Kinda like the story
  of JFK asking a janitor at NASA what he does, promoting the
  answer "I'm putting a man on the moon".I'm somewhat sceptical
  that such a policy is better than what's usually practiced, but I
  can imagine that it may be legitimate under the right
  circumstances.
 
  cma - 8 hours ago
  One of us.Apparently now that they aren't allowed to collude to
  price-fix salaries with illegal anti-"poaching" agreements, they
  aren't letting employees have names.  Can't "poach" (normal
  people call it "hire") 'em if you can't name 'em.
 
  dgacmu - 8 hours ago
  That's really weird.  That said, they reference "our" work (i.e.,
  their work) as citation [10], so one concludes it's likely a
  subset of the paper authors:[10] A. Shrivastava, T. Pfister, O.
  Tuzel, J. Susskind, W. Wang, R. Webb, Learning from Simulated and
  Unsupervised Images through Adversarial Training. CVPR, 2017.
 
  [deleted]
 
  rrmm - 8 hours ago
  This sort of thing has actually been dealt with in the past.  In
  1908, William Gosset working for Guinness brewery in Dublin,
  published his statistical work under the pen name of "Student."
  Which gave us the oddly named "Student's t-test," and related
  distributions.
 
    rayuela - 7 hours ago
    I don't know how I never knew this fact, but this is pretty
    hilarious!
 
joshdance - 8 hours ago
Surprising. Hopefully we see more of this.
 
0xCMP - 8 hours ago
So we're def getting some form of facial recognition in the new
iPhone with stuff like this being published.Feels like an early
post to show they've done some advanced work in making sure you
can't trick them.
 
  j2bax - 7 hours ago
  More info on the Vision Framework from WWDC 2017 here:
  https://youtu.be/UXhgjUIXUak
 
  haikuginger - 8 hours ago
  There's already facial recognition in the iPhone - it's used in
  the photo app to let you sort through photos of different
  people.Wouldn't be surprised to see it more in use, though.
 
exhilaration - 8 hours ago
For anyone curious about why Apple is allowing its researchers to
(anonymously) publish papers like these on an Apple blog, it's
because of this:Apple?s director of AI research Russ Salakhutdinov
has announced at a conference that the company?s machine-learning
researchers will be free to publish their findings. This is an
apparent reversal of Apple's previous position.Refusing permission
to publish was said to be keeping the company out of the loop and
meaning that the best people in the field didn?t want to work for
Apple.From: https://9to5mac.com/2016/12/06/apple-ai-researchers-
can-publ...We will see whether this move is sufficient to attract
the top talent they're looking for.
 
  pducks32 - 2 hours ago
  Apple and many tech companies are a world where association is
  everything. ?I work at Palantir? means a lot. ?I work at Uber? at
  the moment may be both positive and negative.  The academic world
  is not like this at all. Paper count is everything. Churn them
  out with all the power you have. Most universities allow their
  teachers to take sabbaticals on the hope (and sometimes mandate)
  that they will publish. So Apple was not going to find many
  academic researchers who were okay with not being allowed to
  interact in the same way with their community.
 
    hueving - 1 hours ago
    >?I work at Palantir? means a lot.To who? When I hear that I
    just think that means you are a naive fresh graduate doing
    basic data cleaning tasks.
 
      denzil_correa - 1 hours ago
      > When I hear that I just think that means you are a naive
      fresh graduate doing basic data cleaning tasksIsn't that
      presumptuous?
 
  amelius - 8 hours ago
  > Apple?s director of AI research Russ Salakhutdinov has
  announced at a conference that the company?s machine-learning
  researchers will be free to publish their findings. This is an
  apparent reversal of Apple's previous position.How about
  researchers in other fields?!?
 
    egyptiankarim - 6 hours ago
    Right?! I can't wait for the computer-human interaction
    research teams to jump on this trend and start publishing! The
    CHI/HCI/HCC community would flip out. My favorite example of
    how this sort of transparency would benefit the community: In
    2009, Microsoft published an academic paper called "Mouse 2.0"
    (https://www.microsoft.com/en-
    us/research/publication/mouse-2...), where they walked through
    the research prototypes for touch-sensitive peripherals. The
    paper was met with awe and acclaim... A mere few months before
    Apple took the Magic Mouse to market.
 
      threeseed - 5 hours ago
      > A mere few months before Apple took the Magic Mouse to
      marketApple released the iPhone 2 years before the Magic
      Mouse and that paper was released.Quite sure that it was also
      an inspiration.
 
      optimuspaul - 5 hours ago
      Months? The Magic Mouse was released a few weeks later, not
      nearly enough time to develop the product based on the paper.
 
  ForrestN - 6 hours ago
  It is not at all clear that this new publication indicates that
  researchers will not also be allowed to publish in existing
  journals.
 
  make3 - 3 hours ago
  Really, anonymously, wow. Apple going to crazy lengths to keep
  the price of their researchers down. I'm never stepping foot
  there again.
 
    eridius - 2 hours ago
    It's not anonymous. The end of the article says> For more
    details on the work we describe in this article, see our CVPR
    paper ?Learning from Simulated and Unsupervised Images through
    Adversarial Training? [10].And the citation is> [10] A.
    Shrivastava, T. Pfister, O. Tuzel, J. Susskind, W. Wang, R.
    Webb, Learning from Simulated and Unsupervised Images through
    Adversarial Training. CVPR, 2017.So it looks like those are the
    authors.
 
  andyjohnson0 - 8 hours ago
  I wonder - is there really any prestige to be had from publishing
  anonymously?
 
    throwaway91111 - 7 hours ago
    Who the hell publishes for prestige? Most people won't be able
    to understand, let alone care, about your research.
 
      freyir - 6 hours ago
      > Most people won't be able to understand, let alone care,
      about your research?The intended audience is other
      researchers in your field, not the general public.Your
      reputation as an academic or researcher rest on your
      publication record (plus your ability to land funding). If
      you publish highly-cited papers in prestigious journals or
      conference proceedings, you're considered among the best in
      your field. This opens the door to promotions, better job
      offers, etc.Researchers at Apple have historically forgone
      the ability to publish. They have no reputation in the field.
      This significantly harms their ability to get a job elsewhere
      as a researcher.
 
      fsloth - 6 hours ago
      Professional prestige. If you need an ELY5 answer plese just
      request one...
 
      mwfunk - 2 hours ago
      When you get to college, you'll be very disappointed to
      discover that's that's literally the only reason people
      publish in most cases. It ain't for the money, that's for
      sure. It's how you make a name for yourself amongst your
      peers in the same field.You might get a sneak peek at the
      publish-or-perish dynamic to a lesser degree when you get to
      high school- sometimes you can get into special programs
      where you have a chance to help out with research being done
      by college students. If you get into a really good program
      and really distinguish yourself, you can even get your name
      alongside theirs on the paper.Unfortunately, you will find
      that believe it or not, those college students are not
      already working out which color of Ferrari to buy with their
      sweet advance from SIGGRAPH or wherever. I think they deserve
      it personally, because I really care really hard about
      pushing science and engineering forward, but sadly the big
      bucks are still going to NFL players and pop stars instead.
 
    jtraffic - 7 hours ago
    No, none.  I suppose they want researchers to be motivated
    merely by the ability to contribute knowledge to the ML
    community?
 
      wickawic - 3 hours ago
      > I suppose they want researchers to be motivated merely by
      the ability to contribute knowledgeI might phrase it more as
      "They want researchers who are already motivated by the
      contribution of knowledge"I know that if I were an ML
      researcher I would not be happy with all my findings being
      horded by a single company when the field overall is making
      lots of progress.
 
    ssivark - 3 hours ago
    It is not an anonymous publication!1. The article is based on a
    paper submitted to the prestigious CVPR, which is obviously not
    anonymous. ( https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.07828 ) They mention
    this at the end of the post.2. The blog's "journal" name is
    misleading. It means "journal" in the sense of a record of some
    of the stuff happening at Apple. My guess is that the blog post
    does not name authors because it was written by an Apple
    representative who manages public communications---probably
    because Apple is very very particular about managing their
    brand and what they say publicly. I wouldn't put it beyond
    Apple to hire someone well-versed in ML just for this role.So,
    while they are starting to allow researchers to publish, they
    have quite some distance to go to encourage their researchers
    to communicate freely. One step at a time, I guess...PS:
    Somehow the SNAFU of deliberately calling it a "journal"  is
    very reminiscent of Steve Jobs's chutzpah.
 
      jessriedel - 3 hours ago
      Well, the "journal" in the sense of academic publishing and
      in the sense of a blog derive from the same root: a
      continuing first-person description of one's activities,
      updated periodically over a stretch of time.
 
      freyir - 2 hours ago
      > It is not an anonymous publication!So who wrote this? You
      say it's "based on a paper" written by known authors, but did
      they write this publication? Why not put their names not on
      it? Or did a representative write it, as you suggest? We
      don't know. It's anonymous.> The blog's "journal" name is
      misleadingThe usage seems similar to that of "Bell Labs
      Technical Journal" or "Lincoln Laboratory Journal."
 
        denzil_correa - 1 hours ago
        > You say it's "based on a paper" written by known authors,
        but did they write this publication?I'm confused - for me
        the answer is quite obvious. The authors listed on the CVPR
        paper wrote the published paper or are you suggesting
        otherwise?
 
    cannam - 4 hours ago
    All of them can claim the credit for any given article when
    looking for another job later!
 
      ianai - 4 hours ago
      I would think the proper way is to say you worked for that
      department and mention articles published from there.
 
  auggierose - 7 hours ago
  Why would I want to publish stuff if I cannot put my name on it?
  I guess that shows that "rich != smart".
 
    egyptiankarim - 6 hours ago
    The occasional blowhard professor aside, there is a thread of
    idealism in many research circles that advancing the field is
    more important than advancing one's stature. My favorite
    example of this is all of the research that went into the
    creation of Bitcoin and the still unknown identity of its
    creator.
 
      jjxw - 6 hours ago
      Not to presume any motivations of Bitcoin's creator, but it
      doesn't hurt when the success of your research also nets you
      an incredible amount of wealth. Though, as far as I know the
      presumed wallet that he owns has not had any funds moved off
      of it so at least their interest is aligned with the success
      of Bitcoin.
 
      johnsmith21006 - 5 minutes ago
      I would argue the Bitcoin author being secret has created
      more intrigue and possibly more noterriery.   It is believed
      to be Nick Szabo, btw.There is also a security issue as
      thought that he has a lot of bitcoins hidden away.
 
      auggierose - 6 hours ago
      That's a nice example. But putting your name on your research
      is not so much about stature. Publishing anonymously is more
      akin to giving your baby up for adoption. Sure, there are
      people doing this, and they even might have a good reason for
      it, but if you demand that upfront then most people never
      would have babies.
 
      make3 - 3 hours ago
      Except that this is clearly only to keep the price of the
      researchers down. This is shameful.
 
      ksk - 5 hours ago
      I don't quite understand the 'blowhard professor' and bitcoin
      references. There are are hundreds of thousands of attributed
      peer-reviewed publications per year by serious academics who
      want to further the field.
 
    coldtea - 7 hours ago
    No, but "machine learning researcher working for a major
    company" = "smart".
 
    banned1 - 7 hours ago
    I am assuming it is because they are getting paid by Apple.
 
Stasis5001 - 7 hours ago
A lot of academic papers actually aren't all that great, for a
variety of reasons.  Normally, you can use citations, journal, and
author credentials to get a sense of whether a paper is even worth
skimming.  The only "paper" on the "journal" right now looks like
it's just a watered-down, html-only version of
https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.07828!Seems like more of a PR stunt than
anything useful, but who knows.
 
  egyptiankarim - 6 hours ago
  But in the sense that Apple is notoriously tight-lipped about
  research, it's a notable PR stunt. Unlike with Microsoft and
  Google, you don't see a lot of Apple in academic research circles
  despite them having a significant brain-share. Love them or hate
  them, Apple is a powerhouse and the (undoubtedly amazing)
  research happening behind the scenes could do a huge amount of
  good with just a bit more visibility.
 
    [deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
skywhopper - 3 hours ago
Is anyone else amused by the irony of using machine-learning-
trained image generator in order to provide data to a machine-
learning-trained image recognition program? I'm sure the
researchers themselves and plenty of people here could come up with
all sorts of logical reasons why this is fine, and very possibly
given the right protocols it would be fine. But this sort of
approach seems to lend itself toward increasing the risks of
machine-learning. ie, you're doubling down on poor assumptions that
are built-in to your training criteria or which creep into the
neural net implicitly, because you are using the same potentially
flawed assumptions on both ends of the process. Even if that's not
the case, by using less real, accurately annotated data, you're far
less likely to address true edge cases, and far more likely to
overestimate the validity of the judgments of the final product
compared to one with less synthetic training. And if there's one
thing the machine learning community doesn't need any more of, it's
overconfidence.Edit: oops, turns out I mistakenly responded to the
content of the paper instead of the fact that it exists and the
form of its existence. Sorry.
 
  31reasons - 3 hours ago
  Google trained their AI Go algorithm by playing against itself.
  It kind of has the same feel to it.
 
acdha - 7 hours ago
I really wish this had an Atom or RSS feed
 
  matt4077 - 6 hours ago
  It does: https://machinelearning.apple.com/feed.xmlIt's "just"
  not referenced in the source.I get that social networks are the
  tool of choice to prioritise articles from the major news
  outlets?if The Atlantic publishes something spectacular, it will
  find me.But how on earth am I supposed to follow something like
  this, when I have to guess randomly to even find a feed? Are they
  expecting me to bookmark it and check for news once a week?
  There's no Twitter account, newsletter signup, Facebook link...
  nothing.
 
    acdha - 5 hours ago
    So I just got an email back from them and they're going to look
    into adding it. I really like that tone of interaction, too.
 
  ucaetano - 7 hours ago
  Unlikely, but I wouldn't be surprised to see it promoted on Apple
  News.
 
    CameronBanga - 7 hours ago
    They could put it behind the Open? Google AMP. Everyone knows
    that Google is better because they're Open?.
 
dekhn - 7 hours ago
calling this a "journal" and making it anonymous is disingenuous.
 
mrkrabo - 7 hours ago
No ?<br> <br>pseudometa - 7 hours ago<br>I would really like to see the names of people who are working on<br>the research.  They reference other papers and give their authors<br>credit, but was disappointed to not see the Apple employees get<br>credit.<br> <br>ericzawo - 8 hours ago<br>The most Apple thing ever is that they called it a "journal" and<br>not a "blog."<br> <br>  [deleted]<br> <br>  geofree - 6 hours ago<br>  So true http://yarn.co/yarn-story/f8191b73-7685-41ed-<br>  bef5-6e3df0a122...<br> <br>  Waterluvian - 8 hours ago<br>  I'm only 30 and yet I think I've become an old "get off my lawn"<br>  man.  I hate the word "blog" and find "journal" to be a nice<br>  relief. No need to differentiate your log/journal from others<br>  because its on the web. It feels like a language artifact of the<br>  dot com era alongside "surfing" and "cyber".<br> <br>    freehunter - 3 hours ago<br>    I mean, yeah if it's a personal thing about your life, the word<br>    journal might work. But blog means a lot more than that.<br>    Businesses use blogs to highlight products and upcoming events.<br>    Journalists use blogs to publish their stories. Bruce Schneier<br>    and Brian Krebs use a blog to publish research and articles<br>    they've written. 37Signals uses a blog to advertise their<br>    particular way of doing business."Blog" is not short for<br>    "journal on the Internet", it's short for "web log" and means<br>    something far broader than "diary" that you seem to associate<br>    it with. It's not just a log/journal on the web, it's a<br>    newsletter, a flier, a classified ad, a newspaper, a document<br>    repository, a knowledge base, an event calendar, and a ton more<br>    use cases. It's all of those rolled into one. And since<br>    "journal/newsletter/advertisement/diary/repository online" is<br>    too long, we just shorten it to one four letter word: blog.The<br>    weirdest thing to me is when people say they hate specific<br>    words when no other commonly-used word exists to describe the<br>    same thing. You can't hate a word. It's the most fundamental<br>    concept of communication, that we all agree what various<br>    scribbles and noises actually mean. "Journal" has a meaning. So<br>    does "blog". They don't always overlap.<br> <br>    sithadmin - 8 hours ago<br>    This isn't a 'journal' in any sense of what the word implies<br>    when referring to published materials. There's no peer review,<br>    probably no editorial board. Blog is appropriate.<br> <br>      azag0 - 8 hours ago<br>      I agree. I think the closest word from the nondigital era to<br>      a "blog" would a "bulletin".<br> <br>      cel1ne - 8 hours ago<br>      It's a journal in the sense of a scientific diary/notebook.<br>      That is also my first association.The word "journal" comes<br>      from french "jour" which translates to "day".The word blog<br>      comes from log which original comes from tabular record-<br>      keeping of ship speed.<br> <br>      taco_emoji - 8 hours ago<br>      Nobody called it scientific<br>      journal.http://www.dictionary.com/browse/journal:1. a daily<br>      record, as of occurrences, experiences, or<br>      observations[...]3. a periodical or magazine, especially one<br>      published for a special group, learned society, or<br>      profession[...]4. a record, usually daily, of the proceedings<br>      and transactions of a legislative body, an organization, etc.<br> <br>        _delirium - 8 hours ago<br>        The phrase "machine learning journal" strongly implies<br>        academic journal to most machine learning researchers<br>        though, in part because that is actually in the name of<br>        several journals in the field. I don't think Apple is<br>        unaware of that either. This reads to me as quite<br>        deliberately playing on that association, to upgrade the<br>        prestige of the stuff published here vs. what it'd have if<br>        it were just a blog.<br> <br>          dgacmu - 7 hours ago<br>          The first post is actually a summary of a CVPR paper by<br>          Apple employees.  For those not familiar with it, CVPR is<br>          a top conference in computer vision.[0]  Recall, of<br>          course, that "conference" for much of computer science<br>          implies the same length and degree of peer review as<br>          "journal" does in non-CS fields.[0]<br>          http://cvpr2017.thecvf.com/<br> <br>          wuliwong - 7 hours ago<br>          I don't think that really matters. If I only post really<br>          worthy articles in my blog it doesn't become a scientific<br>          journal. I'm not saying that I believe peer-reviewed<br>          journals are the end-all-be-all for science but it does<br>          seem like Apple is being misleading with this.edit<br>          ----------Although, a company publishing a peer-reviewed<br>          scientific journal like Nature would be surprising. So<br>          maybe that isn't the common interpretation when they see<br>          the title. Maybe it isn't totally misleading. I guess I'm<br>          split on it. :)<br> <br>          dgacmu - 7 hours ago<br>          I should have quoted. The person I was replying to<br>          originally said that "apple won't let it's researchers<br>          publish in real journals", and then stealth-rdited their<br>          post.<br> <br>          [deleted]<br> <br>          _delirium - 6 hours ago<br>          It's not common, but also not unheard of for companies to<br>          organize properly peer-reviewed journals for their<br>          internal research. The two most famous are probably the<br>          Bell System Technical Journal and the IBM Journal of<br>          Research and Development. From the title I was expecting<br>          Apple to be continuing in that tradition, but it seems<br>          they aren't.<br> <br>          [deleted]<br> <br>        ozansener - 7 hours ago<br>        If nobody called it scientific journal why it has volumes<br>        and issues? I think Vol. 1, Issue 1 simply suggest they see<br>        it as a scientific journal.<br> <br>        sithadmin - 7 hours ago<br>        It isn't 1: They're not publishing their ML researchers'<br>        daily activities and experiences.It isn't 2: This isn't<br>        what would be generally understood as a 'periodical' or<br>        'magazine'. It doesn't even resemble the trade publications<br>        that are often published by larger businesses.It certainly<br>        isn't 4 - Apple isn't giving away terribly detailed<br>        accounts of their research activities.<br> <br>          TheSoftwareGuy - 7 hours ago<br>          The meanings of words isn't set in stone, rather they<br>          change over time. As long as people generally interpret<br>          the message close to how it was intended to be<br>          interpreted, it's fine.<br> <br>      kgwgk - 7 hours ago<br>      Have you heard of the Linux Journal?<br> <br>      dgacmu - 8 hours ago<br>      From a historical perspective, so is "Journal" -- it harkens<br>      back to the days of things like the Bell System Technical<br>      Journal (published from 1922 to 1983), the IBM Systems<br>      Journal, etc.<br> <br>        _delirium - 7 hours ago<br>        Bell System Technical Journal really was run like a<br>        scientific journal though, with the exception that it was<br>        "internal" to Bell. It had an editor in chief, an editorial<br>        board, papers had to be submitted for review and possibly<br>        revised before publication, etc. And the Bell Labs<br>        scientific community was large and diverse enough that I'd<br>        be comfortable calling their process peer review even<br>        though it was all done internally.<br> <br>      jolux - 8 hours ago<br>      I read it as "journal" as in like a personal journal.<br> <br>      rrmm - 8 hours ago<br>      The proper name I think would be "Technical Reports."  Not<br>      terribly catchy.  But journal does make it sound like they<br>      are pretending to be science-y.<br> <br>      niho - 8 hours ago<br>      Journal does not imply peer reviewed. The word originates<br>      from Latin and simply means "daily". I.e. a periodical<br>      publication. An academic journal can be peer reviewed but<br>      that's not always the case.<br> <br>        wuliwong - 7 hours ago<br>        It's interesting to understand the roots of words but in<br>        this case I think the relevant information to be considered<br>        is how the word is generally understood today in the<br>        context that it is currently presented.<br> <br>      freshyill - 7 hours ago<br>      Not even a DOI.<br> <br>  amelius - 8 hours ago<br>  The word "journal" makes me think more of a scientific journal,<br>  which is something else entirely, [1].[1]<br>  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_journal<br> <br>  tribby - 8 hours ago<br>  how soon we forget about livejournal :)<br> <br>    rrmm - 8 hours ago<br>    Livejournal was peer-reviewed though.<br> <br>Angostura - 5 hours ago<br>I'll be keeping an eye out for acrostics with the author's name.<br> <br>  [deleted]<br> <br></div> </div> </div>