GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-13) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Bitcoin study: Period of exclusivity encourages early adopters
65 points by InInteraction
http://news.mit.edu/2017/bitcoin-study-period-exclusivity-encour...
ty-encourages-early-adopters-0713
___________________________________________________________________
 
basseq - 1 hours ago
I'm struggling with the findings here. From the article: all late
adopters ("NLAs") and non-delayed early adopters ("NEAs") had a
cash out (or abandonment) rate of ~10%. (Ironically, higher for
NEAs at 11%, but likely not statistically significant.) But delayed
NEAs cashed out at 18%, and at even more significant rates where
social ties were stronger (e.g., dorms). And these delayed NEAs can
affect NLA adoption in the long term.Separately, we could say that
general exclusivity schemes (e.g., gmail, facebook) can accelerate
broader market demand. But, of course, it's not causation: plenty
of "exclusive" products never gain traction.So this suggests
there's a certain class of people who care deeply, potentially more
about "status" of being an early adopter than the underlying tech,
and will be toxic if they don't get what they want. So... identify
these people carefully?
 
nebabyte - 1 hours ago
Also known as the late gmail study
 
wyldfire - 3 hours ago
Paper from Science [1] (registration or scihub required).  Not
clear to me whether "cash out" means that they sent funds from a
MIT-controlled wallet into any other wallet or if they took it to
addresses known to be exchanges.  If the former then another
explanation is that they were just being prudent to truly control
the money.[1] http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6347/135
 
  module0000 - 2 hours ago
  wyldfire: Justin M?
 
  sputknick - 3 hours ago
  My first thought as well. These NEAs probably already had a
  mechanism for managing their coin, and so wanted to consolidate,
  rather than have a separate "MIT wallet"
 
    wyldfire - 3 hours ago
    If a prerequisite for getting the funds from MIT was
    establishing your own wallet somewhere and providing a deposit
    addr, then perhaps they could designate "cash out" to mean
    "move from that initial deposit address to anywhere else".
    Aside from some bias caused by sweeping, it's a more reasonable
    way to draw these conclusions.
 
  antix17 - 3 hours ago
  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/suppl/2017/07/12/3...
 
module0000 - 2 hours ago
Bitcoin has come a long way... 7 years ago I was writing perl
scripts to cobble together a depth-of-market program that operated
on the mtgox API. I would get excited scalping coins from $17-19
USD back then. No SEC/CFTC, no regulation, no anything, just good
old fashioned auction market theory - combined with a sucker being
born every moment and winding up on the other end of a mtgox trade.
The sky was the limit, it was an exciting time if you were an
oddball breed of programmer crossed with day trader.Fast
forward.... WTF is going on now? Regulated exchanges for bitcoin,
dozens of btc clones, new exchanges being birthed/destroyed each
month, and the dinosaurs of finance adopting it 10 years too late.
It's a crazy mixed up world.
 
  surrey-fringe - 2 hours ago
  > Regulated exchanges for bitcoinWorking on it.  See: Bitshares,
  or any other decentralized excange
 
    nebabyte - 1 hours ago
    He was answering his own question
 
  adventured - 23 minutes ago
  > the dinosaurs of finance adopting it 10 years too lateThe
  monoliths of finance will set the legislation that will determine
  everything about crypto-currencies in all major economies. And if
  their extreme political power isn't enough, they already by far
  own the most patents relating to blockchain tech.Bitcoin +
  Ethereum = $58 billion.JP Morgan = $330 billion. That's one
  "dinosaur" with $25 billion per year in net income.The notion
  that they're dinosaurs and they're ten years late, is laughable.
  Along with all the other banks and central banks, they'll dictate
  the terms by which crypto-currencies will exist (the only
  alternative to being controlled by the banksters that control
  everything related to finance, is to remain a niche that never
  goes big / mainstream).
 
  ghostbrainalpha - 49 minutes ago
  Are you comfortable saying how much you made with your program on
  mtgox?
 
gtirloni - 1 hours ago
I have a hard time reconciling the social justice goals of some
cryptocurrencies with this initial period where people are
basically creating wealth out of thin air by doing useless
computations at the cost of enormous electricity.How are we any
better for it? A select group gets rich, there is rampant
speculation and fraud... but we're fighting "the man" so it's all
good?I can't see how society is better for this (or ever will
be).I've mined some BTC and ETH while thinking about these issues
and I can't see a future where anything is different so I've
stopped. It seems we'll replace bankers and oil millionaires with
miners and early adopters... and the average Joe is where it was
always.Sorry for thinking out loud all these disconnected thoughts.
I really want to believe but I'm having a hard time.Meanwhile, it
seems I'm doing better for society if I donate my spare resources
to some distributed computing project to research cancer, AIDS,
etc.Where do you see the future in 50-100 years if cryptocurrencies
take off for good?
 
  jstanley - 1 hours ago
  > doing useless computations at the cost of enormous
  electricity.The "cost of enormous electricity" is important -
  this is proportional to the amount it will cost to reverse
  transactions or double spend.> It seems we'll replace bankers and
  oil millionaires with miners and early adopters... and the
  average Joe is where it was always.Miners and early adopters
  don't get to create coins out of thin air. That's the key
  difference.EDIT: And furthermore, there's absolutely nothing
  stopping the "Average Joe" from becoming an early adopter.
  Bitcoin is open to everyone.
 
    tboyd47 - 1 hours ago
    Or, technically, they do, but only according to a predetermined
    schedule.
 
      jstanley - 1 hours ago
      Sure, but not for free :). Having social status as a "miner"
      doesn't grant you any privileges.Expending time, effort, and
      money on mining gives you a chance of mining blocks.
 
  DINKDINK - 31 minutes ago
  >where people are basically creating wealth out of thin air by
  doing useless computations at the cost of enormous electricityThe
  only way this statement is different than how the Federal Reserve
  works is that Bitcoin is voluntary (You only join the economic
  model that you desire to participate in) / non privileged (you
  don't have to be born into certain groups to participate in how
  the system works), the system parameters (inflation, etc) are not
  coercible (The US President can't nominate a Federal Reserve
  Chairperson to bitcoin to favor policy that favors one special
  interest group).>creating wealth out of thin airThe Federal
  Reserve literally creates money out of nothing for the Treasury
  Department.  Due to seigniorage, Fed banks make money on the
  inflated currency before the last man on the street can.>doing
  useless computations at the cost of enormous electricityThe
  thousands of servers that run FedWire, ACH, VISA, MasterCard
  Paypal, Venmo, ApplePay and the Cash-transport Trucks, Physical
  banks, all waste energy preventing people from trying to steal
  money too.How is the current monetary policy better?Relevant
  reading: Nothing is Cheaper than Proof of Work 04 Aug 2015
  http://www.truthcoin.info/blog/pow-cheapest/
 
  rb808 - 51 minutes ago
  BTC is great, you can't say there is no social value. Not only
  are people getting rich like you say but its also useful for
  stuff like buying drugs online and to get around pesky government
  money laundering regulations.
 
    AndrewBissell - 8 minutes ago
    Or donating to organizations to which your government has
    severed other payment channels because they find them
    inconvenient. Or escaping bail-ins and bank holidays. Or
    skipping out on central bank attempts to force consumption and
    punish savings with negative interest rates and cash bans.
 
DiNovi - 2 hours ago
like facebook only accepting university email addresses.