GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Encoding of a digital movie into the genomes of a population of
living bacteria
55 points by skosuri
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature23...
___________________________________________________________________
 
nonbel - 2 hours ago
I still can't get the paper:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14754321
 
  joshgel - 24 minutes ago
  always try sci-hub: http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/nature23017
 
Tossrock - 2 hours ago
Obligatory Dresden Codak: http://dresdencodak.com/2009/07/12
/fabulous-prizes/edit: Sheesh, tough crowd.
 
  johnchristopher - 1 hours ago
  I love Dresden Codak and this one is spot-on. I don't get the
  downvotes.
 
    gue5t - 1 hours ago
    The site hijacks scroll which is pretty upsetting.
 
      bpchaps - 1 hours ago
      Does that warrant downvotes, though?
 
  ghurtado - 1 hours ago
  Thank you for sharing that, I thought it was awesome.I had no
  problems with the scroll of the site, so have an upvote so that
  others may see the link.
 
  tetrep - 15 minutes ago
  While I like the comic, I really wanted to give up before I got
  through the actually relevant/interesting bottom. The whole setup
  was really bad for someone who doesn't know and doesn't care
  about the characters. The author really could have just skipped
  directly to the "I'm going to go write over my junk DNA" bit and
  it would have been fine.Edit: So I assume people gave up and
  downvoted for the seemingly random comic.
 
sharemywin - 2 hours ago
So, the Matrix was wrong we won't be batteries. We'll be data
storage.
 
  sushid - 1 hours ago
  Interestingly enough, humans were never supposed to be used for
  batteries in the original script of the Matrix. Humans were
  supposed to be CPUs for the
  machines.https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/19817/was-
  executiv...
 
    jamra - 16 minutes ago
    Most of that idea comes straight out of the book Neuromancer.
 
[deleted]
 
skosuri - 2 hours ago
Free to Read Albeit Horrible Interface Version: http://rdcu.be/t9oS
 
gene-h - 15 minutes ago
There are number of problems with this, the big one being the
difficulty of reading and writing DNA. In addition, while storage
may be very dense, it is somewhat environmentally sensitive. IE a
single cosmic ray can cause DNA breaks. This principle has been
proposed to make a dark matter detector using sheets of synthetic
DNA on gold[0]. It's also been determined that DNA has a half life
of about 521 years[1]. Of course DNA's overlap does help with this
in addition to the fact we can massively replicate DNA. Being able
to massively replicate DNA can let us copy the same data an
inconceivably huge amount of times so that we have a huge amount of
redundancy. In addition, this ability has let us sequence DNA from
neanderthal bones from ~50,000 years ago.But we might be able to do
better using more stable molecules than DNA. Peptide nucleic acid
or PNA is an interesting option for this. It binds together
stronger than DNA while maintaining a lot of the benefits of DNA.
Now if we're willing to throw away complementarity we could
potentially store information with peptide sequences(proteins). We
have recovered peptide sequences, albeit short fragments that were
repeated numerous times, from dinosaur bones[3](although there are
some worries with contamination here). Peptide sequences might get
tangled up and will almost certainly be more difficult to read.We
could potentially use a similar chemistry to that used in plastics
for even more stability, although synthesis of large amounts of
long sequences will be extremely
difficult.[0]https://www.technologyreview.com/s/428391
/revolutionary-dna-... [1]http://www.nature.com/news/dna-has-a-521
-year-half-life-1.11...
[2]http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7481/full/nature1...
[3]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peptide_nucleic_acid
[4]http://www.nature.com/news/2007/070409/full/news070409-11.ht...
 
jimhefferon - 2 hours ago
So if I encode Metallica into my dog's cells will the RIAA come
after me?
 
  thinkingemote - 34 minutes ago
  Only if you let your dog breed?
 
dekhn - 2 hours ago
That you can store large amounts of data in DNA, and recover it,
should be surprising to nobody.  It should also be surprising that
no matter how well it works, it won't ever become a viable product.
 
  jkimmel - 1 hours ago
  There's no reason storing information in a population of DNA
  molecules is fundamentally unstable.Yes, mutations occur.
  Randomly. This means that if you sequence a set of DNA molecules
  the consensus sequence can still render the proper data string
  despite flaws in each individual copy.In the context of
  generating organisms like this, so long as your stored
  information is not in a loci that could be mutated to regulate
  proliferation in a positive way, mutations in your storage string
  wouldn't propagate in a consensus manner (in some organisms, it's
  hard to make them grow faster. E. coli for instance have already
  been optimized to divide pretty darn quickly by evolution).The
  same is true for populations of DNA molecules rather than
  organisms (are any organisms much more than DNA storage and
  maintenance machines :-D?). Random mutations in one molecule in a
  tube would be different for each neighboring molecule, but the
  consensus sequence is still valid.This all makes perfect
  intuitive sense when you recognize that even some DNA sequences
  with no positive effect on growth are fairly well conserved on
  evolutionary timescales.
  https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Long_terminal_repeat
  https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Alu_element
 
    dekhn - 1 hours ago
    My criticism has nothing to do with the reliability of the
    storage mechanism.
 
  tehlike - 2 hours ago
  why not? what if it is programmed to replicate itself to provide
  redundancy?
 
    dekhn - 1 hours ago
    Actually, you'd start with an erasure code (as the authors of
    these various papers typically do); the redundancy there is
    more effective than mirror replication.  Copying is error-prone
    (10-6 - 10-9) and repair isn't that much better (10-9 - 10-12).
 
    gallerdude - 2 hours ago
    Mutations would occur, yeah? Mutant files, lol.
 
      gue5t - 1 hours ago
      Every medium decays; if you don't estimate longevity and
      perform error correction/migration/etc. accordingly, you
      won't be immune to data loss, just blindsided by it.
 
        dekhn - 1 hours ago
        People who do this use erasure codes.Also, DNA kept in a
        dry, cold environment has an effectively infinite lifespan.
        Now, the interesting question becomes "what fraction of the
        the lifespan of the universe can I maintain my data with
        arbitrary accuracy?"
 
    djohnston - 2 hours ago
    the biggest issue my non-geneticist mind sees with this is the
    issue of mutations.
 
      dekhn - 1 hours ago
      No, the reasons are about business any need.  What does this
      product provide that anybody needs right now?  Storage
      providers are not limited storage device availability -
      storage production is driven by demand from the providers,
      and the producers will make more if demand goes up.Next,
      existing technologies are more mature.  They provide off-the-
      shelf products that integrate into a large ecosystem.  So,
      DNA would have to provide some niche value that hard drives
      or flash drives don't.Finally, with durable storage
      mechanisms, you don't really know how well they work until
      you deploy many instances of the mechanism for their
      lifetime; for DNA storage, that would be billions of cells
      (or more likely, passive storage containers) for decades or
      more.So, I'll go with tapes, hard and flash drives and
      everybody else will too.  MSFT made some claims about rolling
      out DNA_based storage in the decade-future, but they're
      blowing smoke.
 
        y7 - 1 hours ago
        Your reasoning is flawed (and frankly, phrased slightly
        annoyingly in your other comments, in a way where you omit
        your core arguments in what seems like baiting for
        replies). DNA storage provides durability [1] and
        information density (per weight) [2] beyond any current
        technology.1: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/an
        ie.201411378/ab...2:
        http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6328/950
 
          dekhn - 1 hours ago
          That's not higher density because nobody actually made
          something that stores a unique terabyte in DNA.  The
          Science paper stored a megabyte.  Ewan Birney's paper
          stored a concatenation of the same string over and over
          again.Showing you can store a tiny amount of data and
          then claiming you have a density higher than hard drives
          isn't just poor marketing, it's outright lying.To show
          durability, you need to actually test things for the
          planned lifespan, or use intelligent mechanisms to test
          in a shorter lifespan.  Then you can claim durability.
 
[deleted]