GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-10) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Snap falls to IPO price
138 points by prostoalex
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/06/15/snap-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
mmmpop - 1 hours ago
Invest in the things you love and use most! What could go wrong?!
 
gigatexal - 1 hours ago
maybe twitter should buy them
 
[deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
dfrey - 1 hours ago
snapchat baffles me.  It's just another instant messaging platform
except that they came up with the idea of messages that delete
themselves after a time period.  The problem is that this killer
feature is easily subverted by taking a picture of your screen.  So
basically, they have provided an instant messaging platform with
one extra useless feature.
 
  ithought - 27 minutes ago
  If you're messaging someone to be fun or flirty, or just as
  causal friends, do you really want to see the random dumb things
  you said 6 months ago or 3 years ago on Facebook Messenger?Every
  messaging app is essentially like one long email thread, whereas
  Snapchat provides real freedom to be spurious and in the moment
  without future embarrassment.And anyone can secretly record
  anyone at any time in any interaction.  That doesn't stop people
  from communicating freely.
 
  nickrivadeneira - 23 minutes ago
  I use it regularly with a lot of my friends and it's one of my
  favorite apps. Here's my take: The ease of sending and ephemeral
  nature significantly lower the barrier for what you'd consider
  shareable. Imagine you were walking down the street with a friend
  and saw something that gave you a casual chuckle. Something
  mildly interesting. If you were in person you might point that
  out to your friend, promptly forget about it, and carry on with
  your day. If you are by yourself, it probably isn't interesting
  enough to save a picture to your phone and send it via text
  message where the default is the image is immortalized in your
  photo library and text history until you delete it.  Snapchat
  makes it so quick and easy that those little moments are now
  almost as easy to share as pointing to your friend if you had
  been walking together.I agree that the innovations are not major,
  but each little nuanced feature in combination makes it so that
  people share the little moments in life and you suddenly have a
  small window into the daily lives of your close circle.EDIT: I
  should mention that I have no opinions on its viability as a
  business. Just commenting why I enjoy using it.
 
  drewmol - 1 hours ago
  I think it's just a consequence of a popular idea at the right
  time.  And 2 killer features, self deleting shares(no percieved
  history) and it being super easy to select who you do/don't want
  to share with.  Sort of an anti Facebook/public
  history/complicated privacy settings backlash spurred by a
  younger generation who grew up with Facebook always
  existing.Quicken Loans came out with a service called "Rocket
  Mortgage" several years ago and I thought, "who wants to enter
  the likely largest financial commitment of their lives at the
  click of a button?" Turns out, lots of people... simplicity
  sells.Anyways I think eventially once one of these big data
  hording companies goes under to the point of simply selling all
  their user data to the public in form of a paid search engine,
  and public/private key encryption is super simple and mainstream,
  things will change.  I'd bet it might just be when Snapchat goes
  under;-)
 
  [deleted]
 
  beager - 1 hours ago
  More to the point, this "killer feature" is easily cloned by a
  competitor and shows that the product creates no competitive
  barriers. Coupled with the fact that the cloner has a much better
  idea of their users and can target ads much more successfully,
  this creates a long road for $SNAP.
 
    thaumasiotes - 1 hours ago
    > More to the point, this "killer feature" is easily cloned by
    a competitorThis doesn't really agree with> The problem is that
    this killer feature is easily subvertedLet's let one company
    implement the feature before we decide it will be easy for
    competitors to implement it too.
 
    DrScump - 58 minutes ago
      More to the point, this "killer feature" is easily cloned by
    a competitor  ... which is why I was skeptical of Groupon's
    value from the outset.
 
stevenj - 2 hours ago
I think Snap's stock price will continue to fall (to under $10) and
then at some point it'll be acquired, possibly by an asian company
or investment group.
 
JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
Lock-up expires 29 August [1]. On the other hand, they have $3.2bn
of cash and short-term investments (as of 31 March) while burning
about $600MM of cash from their operations (FYE 31 December 2016) a
year. That's 5 years to get it right.EDIT: insider lock-up at T+150
comes in at the end of July.[1]
http://www.nasdaq.com/markets/ipos/company/snap-inc-899497-8...
 
  chollida1 - 2 hours ago
  > Lock-up expires 29 August [1].Its actually the end of July for
  the first and most important IPO lockup expiry.> The first key
  lock-up date for Snap will occur roughly 150 days following the
  IPO. At that point, pre-IPO investors, such as company insiders,
  will be allowed to sell their shares. The second major lock-up
  date applies to 25% of the shares that were offered in the IPO
  itself. Of the 200 million total IPO shares, 50 million of the
  shares will be restricted for one year.
 
    jonbarker - 1 hours ago
    Founding team cashed out pre-IPO for hundreds of millions each.
 
chollida1 - 2 hours ago
Not sure this is really news worthy.They've been heavily shorted
for a while now and their puts are expensive.  But really 1 Billion
new shares could flood the market in just a few more weeks.To put
it in perspective I believe Twitter, the other poster child for
giving away options, had about half that amount.Even the IPO
underwriters are starting to crack.  Credit Suisse used the stock
drop to keep an "outperform" rating on the stock while lowering its
target from $30 to $25.IMHO Snap will do just fine for hte next
year.  They are big enough that companies will carve out a piece of
their marketing budgets for Snap.  It won't be until a year later
when they have enough data on how well their Snap advertising  is
working that they'll decide if its worth it or not.
 
mmanfrin - 2 hours ago
Pardon my language but: no fucking shit. $20bil was unbelievably
overpriced.This is the one major tech stock that I simply do not
get. ~$125 a user is insane.
 
  acchow - 1 hours ago
  Facebook is >$200 per user.
 
    valarauca1 - 31 minutes ago
    Facebook has so completely monopolized social media it is
    successfully driving SNAP out of business. Hence its share
    price is accurate.
 
    toomuchtodo - 1 hours ago
    For Facebook, it's not unreasonable. For SNAP, it is.
 
    draw_down - 27 minutes ago
    Facebook it ain't.
 
    __jal - 1 hours ago
    Facebook is a panopticon with a massive dataset on each user,
    and has a pretty substantial moat by way of users 'punishing'
    each other for leaving, among other competitive
    advantages.Snapchat is a trendy app that could easily become
    uncool, and when it does, I don't see how users feel much of a
    penalty for leaving in the same way FB users do.
 
    skinnymuch - 8 minutes ago
    FB has four massive "empires": FB, Messenger, Whatsapp,
    Instagram. They haven't monetized Whatsapp or Messenger much -
    maybe they never can, but for now that's potential opportunity.
    They have a strong grasp on their massive market share. They
    still have more monetizing to do on Instagram, which is already
    doing well financially. IG alone is worth more than Snapchat.
    FB has a lot of cash and keeps piling it on too. They were
    always profitable and raised a ton more than Snap, including
    the money they didn't lose by pricing the IPO at just the right
    price. Only hurt them for a short time.FB has more immediate
    ways to expand too, most likely. We already saw them transition
    from relying on getting a cut of things like plugins and games
    in FB to that not mattering at all. They could try to go into
    payments more, maybe an Adsense alternative -- likely the only
    company capable of doing so too. Yahoo failed at doing it a
    decade ago and any other company has always been much more
    niche with much more worse payouts.
 
    dna_polymerase - 1 hours ago
    Facebook grew so much, almost everyone has it and its use cases
    are versatile (and therefore the data collected). Snapchat is
    really just used by younger folks with almost no financial
    power for chatting in the weirdest way.
 
      skinnymuch - 1 minutes ago
      Like nick, I'm close to 30 years old too. Snap is big in all
      my social circles. Mostly people between mid 20s to early
      30s. Less popular the older you get, but still significant.
      Regardless, all have enough buying power.Even if Snap never
      gets much traction past people in their 30s, that's enough of
      a market to expand for quite a while. The 18-34 demographic
      is the most coveted. The pre-teen and teen market isn't
      something to completely sneeze at either.
 
      nickrivadeneira - 35 minutes ago
      Anecdotal: I, and a large chunk of my friends and
      acquaintances use snapchat regularly. We're 30 year olds
      making good money. In the same way that some messages are
      best suited for a text message, some for an email, and some
      for a phone call, there are some messages where snapchat is
      the best medium.
 
    adventured - 42 minutes ago
    Facebook has been profitable each fiscal year they've been
    public. Their first full year public they produced $1.5 billion
    in net income.Facebook is tracking to a ~31 PE ratio for fiscal
    2017, with a growth rate that is still high.$14 billion in net
    income (fiscal 2017 speculative), is a lot more important as a
    metric than $200 per user. If they push that net income up to
    $30 billion over the next four or five years (very plausible),
    at 24 times earnings (at that point, speculating on a $720b
    market cap), maybe their per user climbs to $300+ - it still
    won't matter, the net income is what will matter.Snapchat
    doesn't possess any of the positive financial qualities that
    Facebook had, to square against the high per user value.
 
    charlesdm - 1 hours ago
    Facebook was having decent growth at the time. Snap is
    undergoing massive competition from both Instagram, WhatsApp
    AND Facebook. Personally don't believe in the stock. Perhaps at
    $5 to 7 a share I would buy in, but I'm not really seeing it.
 
skywhopper - 2 hours ago
As skeptical as I am that Snap will ever be a moneymaker, this data
point is not meaningful in any way. Facebook traded below (often
_well_ below) its IPO price for the first 15 months on the market.
 
  bdcravens - 1 hours ago
  I don't think the two are equivalent however.
 
    exelius - 1 hours ago
    Agree with you here -- Facebook had a well-formed mobile
    strategy, the only question was whether it would work. Once it
    started to work, the stock took off like a rocket.Snap is a
    much bigger question mark. So far their plan looks to be "Do
    what Facebook did, only for AR/VR". Except Facebook and Snap
    will be splitting the market; where Facebook had no competition
    and absolute dominance before they IPOed. Facebook is obviously
    playing to win on Snap's home turf. Even if Snap is successful,
    Facebook will make it very expensive for them.
 
      wuliwong - 1 hours ago
      I haven't been following SnapChat too closely, I know they
      made some glasses not too long ago. It is surprising to me
      that they are trading on the ID that they will be more
      successful in AR/VR. I can't imagine have invested nearly as
      much into AR/VR as Facebook/Oculus. Amount invested doesn't
      mean success for sure but I expect Facebook to be at the
      forefront of AR/VR at least in  the near future.
 
        bdcravens - 57 minutes ago
        My understanding is that the glasses were little more than
        a gimicky way to get more use of their platform. Felt kinda
        CueCat-ish to me.
 
        giobox - 49 minutes ago
        AR is unfortunately such a broad label, covering an
        enormous variety of implementations from dedicated headsets
        to phone cameras.I'd argue Snapchat delivered one of the
        first mainstream AR 'hits' - many of my friends can't get
        enough of their AR photo filters. To be fair, many of them
        are extremely impressive tech demos, fluidly augmenting the
        user's face in real time video. Whether that's a meaningful
        strategic advantage is another question!
 
  jnisenbom - 13 minutes ago
  As of 2015 YouTube reportedly hadn't turned a profit but was
  breaking even [1, 2]. If the world's number 2 website's business
  model wasn't turning profits after 9 years... we can probably
  expect the same for snap. Definitely makes you wonder about the
  viability of the ad revenue model.[1]
  https://www.wsj.com/articles/viewers-dont-add-up-to-profit-f...
  [2] http://www.businessinsider.com/youtube-still-doesnt-make-
  goo...
 
  likpok - 1 hours ago
  Facebook was profitable before it went public, and faced serious
  strategic challenges immediately post IPO (specifically, mobile
  was exploding and Facebook's mobile story was not good -- it
  didn't even have advertising).I guess the meaningfulness of this
  data point is that people are dubious that SNAP will succeed long
  term. But that's somewhat tautological: if people thought SNAP
  would succeed, they'd buy it.
 
    capkutay - 1 hours ago
    Facebook's mobile story 'was not good'...but it was clearly
    just a missing set of features in a product that was ripe for
    infiltrating mobile and they had the cash to buy to eventually
    buy instagram.The question is whether Snapchat is fundamentally
    flawed or a few features away from becoming a strong company.It
    just seems to me that they have too much competition against
    Facebook...a behemoth that's still innovating.If some company
    came out with a cool twist on search after Google, I'd be
    bearish on them as well.
 
  skinnymuch - 37 minutes ago
  Fb also bought IG at their IPO time and WhatsApp 2 years later.
  Both combined should be worth over $100B today. Compared to the
  roughly $20B spent. Obviously FB is still worth over $300B if we
  hypothetically chop $100B off. Far above IPO still. Just saying
  that FB had multiple things go very well for them to go from
  merely profitable at IPO to being the giant it is now -- mainly
  mobile exploding, but other things too.This doesn't matter too
  much, but it also feels like Snapchat has more competition in a
  way too while growing. Besides other social networks and FB
  copying them, Snow is gaining ground in Asia right now. FB
  primarily had regional competitors limited to one main country
  (like VK or Orkut in Brazil). I could be wrong about this though.
 
    dntrkv - 22 minutes ago
    Google Plus was a very real competitor when they launched
    (right around the time of Facebook's IPO), it was a very
    similar situation to that of Snapchat vs Instagram. Huge user
    growth very quickly, but most of it due to it being attached to
    Gmail. Not saying Instagram won't remain a real competitor to
    Snapchat, but it's possible that over time users will go back
    to their previous habits.Personally, I never post anything on
    Instagram Stories, but I do view them because they are there. I
    have my Instagram feed curated for my Instagram audience (which
    is very public and intended for things that aren't private),
    and Snapchat for my Snapchat audience (which is private and
    intended for only friends and family). I know many others do
    the same.
 
      azinman2 - moments ago
      IG has a much more active and diverse audience than plus ever
      did. In fact they are the king within their own world, where
      as plus was a me too product.I just think they?re different
      worlds, with diff goals. Snap is more about your honest
      moment / communication thru pics where as IG is your
      idealized life.
 
beager - 2 hours ago
What does $SNAP need to do to deliver on the hype? Is there
anything that can make $SNAP a good investment for anyone other
than the parties involved in trading the IPO?I tend to be bearish
on $SNAP in general, but I'm interested in the discussion. How do
they right the ship and boost back up to that $25-30 range? What's
their play?
 
  nikkwong - 1 hours ago
  +1 this. I've asked multiple people and ideas are mostly mixed on
  what Snap's strategy should be going forward. Being a social app
  will definitely be a difficult play. IMO they could try to
  leverage their AR expertise to do, well, something. But social
  definitely seems like it will be tough.Good luck to the team
  though. It must be a stressful time there.
 
    jayess - 1 hours ago
    The fact that no one is responding with ideas tells you what
    you need to know.
 
  draw_down - 31 minutes ago
  It seems to me like a lot of their "value" is in how much more
  engrossing their ads can be than other display ads. They also
  have a whole section of their app that shovels "content" from
  magazines and such, and that content is pretty much just more
  advertising. I'm sure those outlets pay to be there, or pay for
  prominent placing, etc.But those should be easy enough to copy.
  And I find the content thing weird, it feels bolted on to an app
  you use to talk to friends. I am bearish on them, I think it was
  smart to IPO when they did.
 
  skinnymuch - 29 minutes ago
  I was thinking Snap might try to buy Musically before their IPO
  or around IPO time. It would cost more than IG did to FB, making
  the purchase a much larger deal for Snap, but it would be a way
  to allow for the user growth and connectedness to the young crowd
  to continue. I'm not sure how big Musically is now, just seemed
  like it might be a decent gamble for Snap to try and prob provide
  the most [media] hype too.
 
  mi100hael - 1 hours ago
  It's not really clear to me, anyway.  Instagram has been
  unabashedly poaching their features and users, and it's working
  really well.  Snap needs to find new ways to continue to
  differentiate themselves with new features and maybe hardware
  like Spectacles, but with so much overlap in user-base between
  Instagram and Snapchat, I have no idea how they'll be able to
  keep Instagram from continuing to challenge their offerings.
 
  skewart - 42 minutes ago
  Given the product and strategic path they're on the only thing
  they can do to create value is restart user growth.   Their
  business model depends on them becoming a powerful brand
  advertising platform (brand advertising is when companies want to
  spread general awareness of their brands and influence the
  public's overall impressions of what a company stands for, even
  if it is far removed from any actual moment of purchase; TV has
  traditionally been the dominant brand advertising platform, but
  as cable TV is beginning its decline into irrelevance the top
  spot is up for grabs).  They're not into collecting super
  detailed info on users, so advertising can't be too targeted, and
  they're not pushing a shopping angle either.And in order to
  become a compelling brand advertising platform they need massive
  reach (i.e. at least a billion users).How can they restart user
  growth?   Well, that's probably going to be pretty hard at this
  point.  I suspect they'll need to broaden their appeal from their
  initial teens/college/just-out-of-college user base to an older
  and more diverse crowd (just like Facebook and Instagram did).
  That will probably require some UI redesign to make things a bit
  more intuitive to navigate, and perhaps other feature changes
  that make it a more attractive destination.However, I think it's
  basically all but impossible for them to restart the growth
  engine at this point.  A lot of people have heard of Snapchat,
  tried it, and decided they don't like or just don't see the point
  when they already use Instagram.Making matters worse is the fact
  that their initial market is incredibly hard to hold on to.
  Things almost never stay super popular across multiple
  "generations" of high school and college kids (except for default
  utilities that everyone at every age uses).  In other words, it's
  unlikely that Snapchat will be popular with high school and
  college kids in five years.So, I suspect that as their metrics
  stagnate and decline over the next few years they will
  increasingly focus on a series of moonshot new product ideas
  (like Specs) and hope that something sticks.  But there's little
  reason to suspect that they'll be any better at building a random
  new product than any other start-up or big company out there
  (and, in fact, I'd argue there are some good reasons to think
  they'll be worse).As is probably pretty obvious, I'm quite
  bearish on Snap these days.  I was extremely bullish a year and a
  half ago, but they've just been so slow to execute when it
  mattered.  They lost their wave of growth.   At this point, I'd
  be surprised if they can catch another.
 
  physcab - 1 hours ago
  - Positive user growth numbers, not flat or negative- Positive
  revenue growth numbers, not flat or negative- New features
  launched and positively accepted in the market
 
    skinnymuch - 21 minutes ago
    So they need to do almost everything right and have luck on
    their side with things like positive acceptance. A betting man
    prob doesn't like all those bullet points needed.
 
cft - 2 hours ago
Financially it does not matter for the founders that much anymore.
Significant wealth has already been transferred and cashed
out:http://www.nasdaq.com/quotes/insiders/spiegel-evan-1016829
 
  adventured - 30 minutes ago
  There are only a handful of people on the planet that could
  reasonably claim that $1.4 billion doesn't matter that much to
  them (and none of them are likely to actually hold that
  belief).It's an absurd premise to claim that 80%-90% of someone's
  wealth does not matter much to them. Not to mention implying all
  sorts of horrible things about their character in the process (to
  claim what you are, is identical to claiming that Spiegel is ok
  with losing that money as opposed to keeping it and doing
  something good with it, that he would feel indifferent to the
  contrast of said scenario).
 
    tanderson92 - 7 minutes ago
    I believe the point is more about the marginal utility of
    wealth and what additional products and services $1.4 billion
    can buy relative to the $250+MM net worth they have now.
 
habosa - 2 hours ago
$17.00 was the IPO price but only for investors with access.  Your
average investor with an eTrade account saw a price of $24.00+ when
the market opened that morning, and it hit almost $27.00 that day.
So those folks have seen a 30%+ drop since IPO.Given that Snap paid
out billions in IPO bonuses to executives and other employees, it's
turned out to be a pretty big wealth transfer from retail investors
to Snap employees.
 
  toephu2 - 32 minutes ago
  Snap employees can't actually sell any stock until 6 months after
  IPO.
 
  acchow - 1 hours ago
  Did you try to subscribe to the IPO? It was not hard at all. I'm
  an "average" investory with a standard Charles Schwab trading
  account and subscribed to it with a few clicks of my mouse. I
  imagine anyone else could with their brokerage. It was
  oversubscribed tho, so I got half the quantity I wanted and sold
  shortly after opening.
 
    toephu2 - 30 minutes ago
    You got half you order filled at $17 with Schwab on opening
    day? Or it fills before market open?
 
    prostoalex - 1 hours ago
    Yep, same here. Fidelity account with pretty low balance but
    profiled for "aggressive growth", opted into their IPOs, and I
    got an invitation to participate. Blue Apron, too, among
    others.
 
    davidw - 1 hours ago
    > It was oversubscribed tho, so I got half the quantity I
    wanted and sold shortly after opening.This seems like a pretty
    good reason to auction the shares in order to maximize the
    amount of money the company takes in.  That they very rarely do
    has always seemed kind of dirty to me.
 
      acchow - 1 hours ago
      Google tried to be cheeky and go the auction way. It was
      wrought with problems.As far as I can tell, all tech IPOs
      following that went back the traditional way.
 
        thanatropism - 34 minutes ago
        > problemsHow can I learn more about this?
 
          pfarrell - 16 minutes ago
          Search "google dutch auction ipo"
 
          tristanj - 13 minutes ago
          http://www.cnbc.com/2014/08/19/es-took-off-but-the-
          auction-d...
 
      jacquesm - 1 hours ago
      That would stop the issuers from making a bundle on just
      about every IPO and we can't have that now, can we?
 
        acchow - 1 hours ago
        So this is pretty lazy anti-intellectualism.Can you provide
        some evidence that the investment banks are colluding on
        IPO pricing?
 
          hobs - 1 hours ago
          How is that anti-intellectualism? Not saying they are
          right, but criticizing wallstreet/giant tech companies
          for price fixing is not that.
 
          acchow - 6 minutes ago
          They are claiming the banks are fixing prices without
          offering any proof.Well, the "proof" being "we all know
          banks are greedy and evil, so they must be doing this"
 
          davidw - moments ago
          They are quite literally setting the prices of IPO's
          though, by fiat, and not via an auction or some other
          market-oriented mechanism.I have no opinion about actual
          'collusion' but the mechanism looks pretty bad seen from
          afar.
 
          skywhopper - 53 minutes ago
          The facts that they are the primary beneficaries of
          underpriced IPOs (ie, the biggest reward for the smallest
          risk) and that they are the all-powerful gatekeepers of
          the process and that most of these IPOs shoot up in price
          on day one (meaning that their customers are leaving huge
          amounts of money on the table) is a pretty good
          indication. If you don't count fully aligned incentives
          as evidence, it's at least very clearly a process ripe
          for collusion and corruption, and should be handled with
          extreme care and skepticism.
 
          chimeracoder - 35 minutes ago
          > The facts that they are the primary beneficaries of
          underpriced IPOs (ie, the biggest reward for the smallest
          risk) and that they are the all-powerful gatekeepers of
          the process and that most of these IPOs shoot up in price
          on day one (meaning that their customers are leaving huge
          amounts of money on the table) is a pretty good
          indicationOn the other hand, the entity that they are
          taking money from is literally the company that's IPOing
          (when the price shoots up, it's called leaving money on
          the table, because it's money that the company isn't
          raising in their IPO, and is instead going to the
          banks).There's a reasonable degree of competition between
          banks to underwrite an IPO, and companies have the
          ability to choose which bank to work with, so any
          conspiracy here would require actual widespread collusion
          between underwriters (which would be illegal the same way
          horizontal integration generally is in any industry).
          While not impossible, that's the sort of claim which
          warrants tangible evidence, rather than indirect evidence
          just from the existence of shareholder prices increasing
          on the opening bell.
 
          nikanj - 28 minutes ago
          "Well-established protocols" can result in IPO prices
          being systematically set too low. Yes, theoretically a
          bank should be able to break the ranks, but all they
          would get for their trouble is smaller profits, and a
          potential lawsuit from investors. After all, they did
          diverse from the "established accounting standards" when
          pushing the IPO price up.
 
          chimeracoder - 8 minutes ago
          >  "Well-established protocols" can result in IPO prices
          being systematically set too low. Yes, theoretically a
          bank should be able to break the ranks, but all they
          would get for their trouble is smaller profits, and a
          potential lawsuit from investors. After all, they did
          diverse from the "established accounting standards" when
          pushing the IPO price up.Assuming a roughly competitive
          market with n players that do not engage in direct
          collusion, if IPO prices are being set too low from the
          perspective of the companies IPOing, there's room for an
          additional player (n+1) to set their prices slightly
          higher. Assuming their ability to predict the risk on the
          opening bell prices is the same as the other n players'
          ability to predict risk, that bank will produce IPOs that
          are consistently favorable for the companies IPOing, and
          companies will choose that bank as their underwriter.
          Ceteris paribus, their profits would grow, not
          shrink.There are factors that impede this from happening
          perfectly in practice - such as barriers to entry for the
          underwriters - which is (part of) what explains why this
          disparity won't trend to exactly zero. But it's wrong to
          say that banks would get punished by either companies or
          their investors for responding to this disparity by
          raising prices - the exact opposite would happen. And in
          itself, that still doesn't point to widespread collusion
          between banks, or even any sort of implicit conspiracy.
 
          davidw - 52 minutes ago
          I think it's simply stating the obvious: rather than
          using a market-based mechanism for price discovery, they
          pick a price to sell at.  For a bunch of people who are
          such big fans of markets, this looks really dubious.
          "Markets for thee, but not for me".
 
    kartD - 1 hours ago
    Thanks for the info, I think my next bank account is going to
    be with Charles Schwab ( I was waffling between Ally and
    Charles Schwab, but this is a useful feature for me and a good
    step up from Robinhood).
 
      acchow - 1 hours ago
      I was referring to the trading account, which is independent
      from the bank.Tho Charles Schwab bank accounts are useful
      because they refund your ATM fees.
 
        tanderson92 - 1 hours ago
        Free checking account helps too; they sent me two boxes of
        checks and a checkpad with a $0 initial balance, for no
        fees.And they offer you commission-free trades too if you
        offer to transfer in enough funds.Great, great, place to
        keep your finances.
 
          toomuchtodo - 29 minutes ago
          How's their mobile app on iOS?
 
          jnisenbom - 25 minutes ago
          Pretty similar to android (IMO)
 
          legolassexyman - 2 minutes ago
          Are you a Marx Brother? Sheesh.
 
        kartD - 1 hours ago
        I'm aware, but I'd like to keep the as few accounts as
        possible. Should simplify transfers and customer service.
 
        [deleted]
 
      [deleted]
 
      eeeeeeeeeeeee - 58 minutes ago
      I switched from Wells Fargo to Schwab last year. I've been
      very happy and the customer service is great. The web
      interface is a bit cluttered, but i've seen worse at banks
      :)Refunds on all ATM fees make it worth it for that alone.
 
      8ytecoder - 52 minutes ago
      I wasn't aware of it but Robinhood did offer SNAP IPO:
      https://support.robinhood.com/hc/en-
      us/articles/115000902306...
 
        kartD - 34 minutes ago
        Yes, but it's filled at regular price (I bought SNAP at
        $24), it's just that you put in the trade previous day (in
        the case of SNAP). It's more of a convenience feature, you
        won't get the stock at the pre-IPO value ($17 in SNAP's
        case).
 
      ZeroCool2u - 1 hours ago
      I've had Charles Schwab since I was 18 and I can't recommend
      them enough. I've never experienced any company with better
      customer service.
 
    WheelsAtLarge - 1 hours ago
    Not everyone was able to buy at the IPO price. My friend was
    invited but could not buy any shares. BTW, being invited does
    not mean you'll be able to buy. It just means you'll be able to
    request shares.
 
  champagnepapi - 1 hours ago
  Bothers me that institutional investors and other insiders get
  preferred pricing while retail investors get less favorable
  pricing.
 
    JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
    To be fair, institutions are often negotiating with
    underwriters on the pricing. That kind of price discovery
    doesn't happen with retail investors.
 
    prostoalex - 1 hours ago
    > retail investors get less favorable pricinguntil today, that
    is
 
    lallysingh - 1 hours ago
    They also commit to purchase large amounts before the final
    demand is known.  Their price is a combination of a bulk
    discount and risk discount.
 
    acchow - 1 hours ago
    So this isn't true. Any average Joe could open a standard
    trading account and subscribe to the IPO.
 
      beamatronic - 1 hours ago
      Fidelity has a minimum of $100k or $500k to participate in
      IPOs depending on the specific IPO
 
        acchow - 1 hours ago
        Then I'd suggest going with etrade or schwab.
 
      prklmn - 1 hours ago
      The access to shares still isn't even comparable
 
  will_pseudonym - 1 hours ago
  And they can also re-invest in the stock now, at these great sale
  prices.?And if they insist on trying to time their participation
  in equities, they should try to be fearful when others are greedy
  and greedy only when others are fearful? - Warren Buffett
 
    mikestew - 1 hours ago
    Since we're pulling out pithy quotes, I have one: "the trend is
    your friend", and your friend is telling you to stay the hell
    away from this stock.
 
      will_pseudonym - 42 minutes ago
      I'll stick with the Oracle of Omaha. :)
 
        semperdark - 12 minutes ago
        Do keep in mind that he rather famously avoids investing in
        tech companies.
 
  csomar - 33 minutes ago
  They sold at 17$ (ipo prices) not higher. So right now, both
  sides are equal.
 
zitterbewegung - 1 hours ago
Following snapchats fluctuations about its stock price is somewhat
interesting . To be honest though I'm getting fatigued on this. I
remember when Facebook IPOed and we were getting similar posts. The
fact that Snap was able to IPO and get money to become more
competitive will have to wait for a few quarters though.
 
  naturalgradient - 1 hours ago
  I think the situation is not comparable at all precisely because
  Facebook did not have a larger network strangulating their
  growth.I wonder if there is any precedent for a social network
  (or any large application for that matter) having their growth
  stalled to single-digits and then it picking up again.To me, it
  looks like there is a very real possibility that facebook already
  killed them in the sense that they will never go beyond 250
  million or so users, which does not support their valuation. So
  share-wise, they might end up a second Twitter, just with a much
  faster turnaround this time because user growth has already come
  to a grinding halt.
 
korzun - 1 hours ago
I think it is safe to say that the IPO was a total scam. The
company was never profitable, and numbers never made any sense.I
have a bridge in Brooklyn up for grabs (cheap) if you still think
the valuation was based on ridiculous data points such as active
users, etc.People already lined their pockets up and you will be
reading another P.R piece on how great of a businessman Evan is
within the next couple of months.Spend all of the funding on
aggressive marketing to get the numbers up pre-IPO, file for an IPO
and cash out. Rinse & repeat.
 
  gruez - 20 minutes ago
  Is it really a scam if there was no deception and every buyer
  knew what they were getting into?
 
  jayess - 1 hours ago
  > I think it is safe to say that the IPO was a total
  scam.Precisely.
 
bsaul - 38 minutes ago
i wonder if the community realizes how bad those kind of overhyped
companies makes us look to the general audience, with founders
cashing out shortly after the stock gets public and everybody
realizes valuation were simply absurd.i don't think we'll have to
wait for a long time before we see traditional investment funds and
banks not willing to take part in that game anymore.