GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Loudness
56 points by mjgoins
http://www.chicagomasteringservice.com/loudness.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
golergka - 42 minutes ago
Since Youtube and most streaming services started to automatically
balance tracks based on their average perceived loudness (not all
of them use the same metric, but the purpose is the same), loudness
war is almost dead. If you brickwall your song, it will not be
played louder than competition anymore.
 
  copperx - 6 minutes ago
  The algorithms that determine perceptual loudness are very
  inaccurate, so it's still possible to game them.
 
mortenjorck - 1 hours ago
For practical listening, I actually prefer modern brickwall
mastering techniques to more traditional mastering with a high
dynamic range, for one reason: what the author sees as "hijacking
the volume control from the listener" I would consider the
opposite.With a high dynamic range, a headphones listener may feel
the need to adjust the volume several times in a song to boost the
clarity of softer sections or to make louder sections more
comfortable to the ears, depending on the listening environment.
With a "loud," low dynamic range, however, the listener need only
adjust the volume once, as the whole track is roughly the same
volume. In other words, the listener is in control of the volume,
rather than the engineer.
 
  xkcd-sucks - 42 minutes ago
  It's easier to remove dynamic range on playback than to add it
  back in... don't many stereos have a "loudness" function which
  brickwalls the audio?
 
    Fice - 31 minutes ago
    The "loudness" switch on stereo amplifiers is for loudness
    compensation [1], not compression.[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_compensation
 
  pdkl95 - 42 minutes ago
  > boost the clarity of softer sections or to make louder sections
  more comfortable to the earsYou can create these effects during
  playback with a compressor, which are available in many
  players[1]. Knowledge about compressors isn't as widely known as
  it should be; it's an important feature that would help a lot of
  people, especially anyone dealing with hearing loss.>
  headphonesMaybe try better headphones (or a different type, such
  as enclosed headphones with good room attenuation)? Many cheap[2]
  headphones have terrible response to different volumes; quieter
  parts may be overly attenuated, for example. Cheap/bad headphones
  also tend to have a highly variable frequency response, which can
  sometimes sound like volume problems. If this is the case,
  spending some time with a highly configurable EQ might help
  (possibly in addition to a compressor).[1] also available in some
  audio systems (e.g. jack) and as a feature in some
  drivers/soundcards[2] and some "name brand", such as older Bose,
  anything Beats or other brands sold as fashion statements.edit:
  re-added sentence that died during a bad copy/pasteedit2:
  Appendix for anybody that isn't familiar with dynamic range
  compression.> need to adjust the volume several timesThis is
  literally what a basic compressor is automating[3] for you. It
  turns down the output volume when the input level is over a
  threshold. There are a lot of (often configurable) details like
  how much to reduce the volume as the input level increases past
  the threshold, how quickly[4] it responds to a loud transient,
  and how quickly it returns to normal when the input becomes quiet
  again. Really nice compressors even smooth[5] the changes near
  the threshold so the whole effect is less noticeable.[3] https://
  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range_compression#Desi...[4] https:
  //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range_compression#Atta...[5]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range_compression#Soft...
 
  TheNewAndy - 36 minutes ago
  As an analogy, how about if all text was served to you as .png
  files where the person writing the text has guessed what size
  text you want?This is vaguely equivalent - it is difficult to go
  from image->text, just as it is difficult (or impossible) to go
  from low dynamic range -> high dynamic range. The reverse
  direction is cheap (and possible).In fact, some compression
  codecs even have well defined compression curves to use - so your
  codec isn't just "bitstream in, pcm out" it is
  "bitstream+listening environment in, pcm out".
 
  Swizec - 19 minutes ago
  I have an even simpler wish. All I want is to comfortably listen
  to my audiobook when running without going deaf when Strava comes
  on to give me pacenotes. My kingdom for per-app volume
  control!That's one benefit of podcasts. They often have lower
  quality but louder audio so I don't have to pump up the volume
  when I'm out and about.
 
  mbell - 16 minutes ago
  There is value to constant volume, but I think a lot of the
  loudness war came from a time when there implementing a
  compressor on the user's side was expensive. It's trivially cheap
  now, basically every device you own that can produce audio now is
  capable of implementing a decent digital compressor with no
  additional hardware costs and about 5 minutes of an software
  engineer's time. If this wasn't hard when the loudness war set
  in, we'd probably just have a checkbox that defaults to 'on' in
  all these devises instead of the master being messed up. In other
  words, the timing of cheap, low power audio DSPs missed the boat
  by a couple years.
 
  nathanasmith - 1 hours ago
  Just give me the option. When I'm in the car, I like the "wall of
  sound" since it's a noisy environment, so I have a head unit with
  a built-in compressor I can control. When I'm at home, I prefer
  the dynamic range. The problem comes when the engineer takes that
  option away from me (quite often) clipping and distorting
  everything to the nth degree. Like the article mentions, this
  creates ear fatigue and I end up, eventually, just not wanting to
  listen to the CD at all which colors my perception of the band.
  So I'm less likely to go to their concerts and give them money.
  That's just me though.
 
  Qantourisc - 56 minutes ago
  In my opinion this is a software problem,  you just need some
  automatic gain control (automatic volume adjust).
 
amelius - 2 hours ago
Was there any way we could have prevented the "loudness war"?
 
  santoshalper - 2 hours ago
  There is research that shows that on a casual listen, people
  believe louder music sounds better. Similarly, people tend to
  find brighter pictures more appealing at a glance, even though
  both of these can be fatiguing and cause discomfort. That's why
  stereo stores (in so much as they still exist) crank up the music
  to very loud volumes and all the TVs at Best Buy are grossly mis-
  calibrated.Unfortunately, most musicians are just hoping you will
  notice their song when it comes up on the radio, pandora, a
  friends iPhone and so everyone is incentivized to crank their
  song to the max.The thing that bums me out is that there were
  really good records released in the 2000's that are mastered
  terribly, and we may never hear a better version. It's one thing
  when a stooges album is fucked up on re-release, I can always
  grab the original, there may never be another version of "Is This
  It".
 
    amelius - 1 hours ago
    I'm guessing a deep learning approach could correct those badly
    mastered tracks. At least, it is pretty easy to find and
    generate training data.(?)
 
    petercooper - 1 hours ago
    The thing that bums me out is that there were really good
    records released in the 2000's that are mastered terribly, and
    we may never hear a better version.There's an excellent example
    of this occurring in the recent remastered re-release of
    Oasis's Be Here Now which had horribly thick and overdone
    production but has now been opened up somewhat. It's still
    loud, but it's Oasis after all.I don't have an example of the
    before, but the 'after' is good:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyJU2136ym4 .. interestingly,
    this is also an example of remastering and re-editing an old
    music video too.
 
    tnecniv - 1 hours ago
    > Unfortunately, most musicians are just hoping you will notice
    their song when it comes up on the radio, pandora, a friends
    iPhone and so everyone is incentivized to crank their song to
    the max.Most people also just aren't listening through good
    equipment that emphasizes good dynamics. Tons of people are
    happy listening to compressed songs through the earbuds they
    got for free with their phone.
 
    agumonkey - 1 hours ago
    Because it's consumerism. You want quick and deep stimulus. Not
    subtlety. When you're "educated" [1] you start to look the
    other way around. I remember understanding the value of a good
    DAC chip on a smartphone, even with a crappy mp3, I could
    rediscover songs that I've listened to a thousand time on bad
    DACs.Same goes for photography, poetry etc etc.. mass market
    doesn't mesh well with that.[1] whether by society or by your
    own passion
 
    digi_owl - 2 hours ago
    I found myself pondering this in relation to the resurgence of
    LPs.I wonder if the lower dynamic range of LPs restricts music
    released on them from being overly loud, and thus not as
    fatiguing to listen to as more modern formats.
 
      microcolonel - 1 hours ago
      Not exactly.It is technically the case that vinyls have less
      frequency response (basically a low pass filter) than good
      (really effectively perfect) reproduction formats like CD.
      That certainly means that the maximum loudness value is
      lower, but dynamic range is not required for loudness, gain
      and frequency response are.If anything, having less dynamic
      range would encourage people to make louder records.
 
  microcolonel - 2 hours ago
  We could have by having EBU R128/ITU-R BS.1770 published before
  CD, and having those metadata built in to the CD standard, and
  perhaps requiring it.The loudness war started before CD, but if
  we had this stuff back then it might have been possible to avoid
  these problems. As a consumer, I add BS.1770-based replaygain
  tags to all of my music, and set a constant gain offset for all
  applications which don't have loudness normalization.I'm most
  annoyed by albums which have huge loudness gradients for
  completely different movements or independent tracks, it forces
  me to manually remove album replaygain tags in favour of the
  track values.Notable also, this page makes no mention of loudness
  monitoring, which I think is outrageous. To complain about this
  problem without mentioning the existing solution is pretty bogus.
 
morecoffee - 2 hours ago
Tangential, but for the longest time I couldn't figure out why VLC
always played music / DVDs at such low volume.  Setting the system
volume to max and overdriving VLC's volume slider was the only way
I could actually hear the soft parts.Recently I found out about the
volume compressor, which with a single check box does exactly the
right thing.  I asked myself "why the heck isn't this box checked
by default?"  I think the answer is with audio purists wanting to
stem the loudness war.When reading about CD mastering maxing out
the volume, It seems like it is the right decision.  Most people do
want the loudest setting, no mess with the EQ, compressors, etc.
Only a tiny population wants to preserve the fidelity of the
amplitude.
 
  mrspeaker - 1 hours ago
  I think the reason it's not on by default is that so much music
  is already compressed to insane levels that sounds terrible -
  double-y compressing things doubles the terribleness.I love
  music, but I wouldn't call myself an audiophile (heck, I'm
  listening out of my lappy's default sound card with cheap
  headphones) but in this case I totally agree with the
  audiophile's term "fatigue". Music that is over-compressed
  doesn't sound bad to my untrained ear, but it's just fatiguing
  after a while. The silence that finally comes is a pleasure!But
  having it double-compress by default is like hearing those people
  who want to play there car stereo louder than their system can
  handle and it distorts like crazy: they are obviously still
  enjoying it - but it's not the song the artists recorded. (Ok,
  maybe an exaggeration... but I still don't think we should
  encourage it!)
 
  trevyn - 1 hours ago
  Movies generally have a wide dynamic range so that loud action
  scenes are very loud. You don't want your normal dialogue to be
  at the same volume as your explosions, unless you're watching at
  home with the volume down.