GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Show HN: ORC - Onion Routed Cloud
42 points by sp0rkyd0rky
https://orc.network
___________________________________________________________________
 
fiatjaf - 4 hours ago
What is it? There's no explanation of what it is in the website,
although there is a whitepaper, documentation, a tutorial and a
description of the protocol.From the whitepaper Abstract:"A peer-
to-peer cloud storage network implementing client-side encryption
would allow users to transfer and share data without reliance on a
third party storage provider. The removal of central controls would
mitigate most traditional data failures and outages, as well as
significantly increase security, privacy, and data control. Peer-
to-peer networks are generally unfeasible for production storage
systems, as data availability is a function of popularity, rather
than utility. We propose a solution in the form of a challenge-
response verification system coupled with direct payments. In this
way we can periodically check data integrity, and offer rewards to
peers maintaining data. We further propose that in order to secure
such a system, participants must have complete anonymity in regard
to both communication and payments."
 
  fiatjaf - 3 hours ago
  I think I was mistaken (but this should hint at the state of the
  landing page design), there is actually a simple explanation of
  what it is if you scroll:"The ORC Project is a peer-to-peer
  network of computers that coordinate anonymously over Tor to
  allocate their unused hard disk capacity into a collective cloud.
  Developers can use the ORC network as an object storage platform
  in place of the popular cloud services offered by Amazon, Google,
  and Microsoft. Peers automatically pay each other based on
  storage used, bandwidth, and availability using the anonymous
  cryptocurrency Zcash for a fraction of the cost of using a
  traditional centralized cloud.In the ORC network, files are
  encrypted on the user's computer, shredded into smaller chunks,
  and then stored on many different computers around the world.
  Redundancy is achieved through the use of erasure codes so that
  your data can always be recovered even in the event of large
  network outages. ORC is completely decentralized, meaning that no
  single company or organization has control of your data, only
  you!"
 
    digi_owl - 2 hours ago
    Sounds very much like Freenet...
 
      woodandsteel - 2 hours ago
      Yeah, except it is all encrypted so only the person who owns
      the data can read it (unless of course they decide to make
      the key public), and you pay for the storage with zcash.
 
        polle626 - 23 minutes ago
        So basically it solves all Freenet problems?
 
  fiatjaf - 4 hours ago
  Somewhat related: why every project out there that wants to
  appear as serious has to publish a "whitepaper", which is
  basically any gibberish you want in a PDF format?(Not saying ORC
  is gibberish at all, but I do have seem the most simple and
  stupid ideas written in tech projects whitepapers over the last
  years.)Why can't a project write all it wants in HTML pages, with
  links, clickable topics, separated pages, images, code snippets,
  examples etc., everything that could make it better to read and
  understand?
 
    dna_polymerase - 3 hours ago
    Because whitepapers look scientific and somewhat professional.
    At least enough to let people believe a given project is worth
    an ICO investment. (Not ORC, but still, guys c'mon just give us
    the information on a website)
 
    api - 2 hours ago
    It reminds me of the Kickstarter and Angellist video fad.
 
woodandsteel - 2 hours ago
This looks like the opposite of IPFS in terms of what gets stored
on your computer if you are part of the network.On IPFS, something
gets on your computer only if you decide to let it, and there are
blacklists to automatically keep off material you don't want.On
ORC, it seems that encrypted pieces of everything get stored, so
you can wind up with all sorts of things you don't want, but on the
other hand might be able to deny legal responsibility.
 
  polle626 - 23 minutes ago
  Well, in ORC you get paid for storing things, in IPFS you don't.
 
philippnagel - 4 hours ago
Interesting, does anyone know how this is related to storj.io?
 
  Dystopian - 3 hours ago
  It looks like a bunch of their team was part of the Storj team
  previously - maybe a fork of Storj's core to be compatible with
  Onion vs Blockchain?It looks like their website is also based on
  the same theme.From a commented out paragraph:
  
 
    woodandsteel - 1 hours ago
    >maybe a fork of Storj's core to be compatible with Onion vs
    Blockchain?That is the impression I get from the Storj and ORC
    faq's. They both are distributed storage networks with files
    split up in pieces and encrypted.  Storj uses the blockchain to
    make files immutable, ORC uses tor hidden services and zcash to
    make the file owners anonymous and the servers hidden.
 
  wyldfire - 2 hours ago
  IIUC, this was a fork of storj created by a recently-former
  maintainer [1].  Strikes me as a great time to liquidate your
  SJCX (I just did).[1]
  https://www.reddit.com/r/storj/comments/6llxpn/so_long_frien...
 
kodablah - 2 hours ago
Sorry I have not dug too deeply, but I have some questions.1. Are
there controls (i.e. proof-of-stake) to enforce equitable and
lasting storage of your items on others' machines?2. What is the
consensus model for marking peers as bad actors?3. What are the
redundancy guarantees? That is, how many nodes store my data?4.
What is the "currency" of sorts that I must "pay" in order to store
a certain amount? Amount of hard disk I contribute back?5. Why was
the AGPL chosen? Surely adoption by any means, commercial or
otherwise, would be welcome in a system that has equitable sharing
guarantees. Now if I want to implement your spec in my choice
license, I can't even read your reference implementation.Maybe some
fodder for the FAQ. If not answered later, I'll peruse the
whitepaper.
 
  polle626 - 24 minutes ago
  proof-of-retrievability, I imagine somewhat like what Storj, Sia
  and Filecoin do.zcash is the currency.