GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-07) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How Nature Solves Problems Through Computation
55 points by digital55
https://www.quantamagazine.org/how-nature-solves-problems-throug...
___________________________________________________________________
 
j2kun - 50 minutes ago
The last few years have seen a number of very interesting
developments along the lines of understanding the natural world
through the so-called "lens of computation." Some interesting talks
can be found here [1] as well as an essay here [2], on the topics
of economics, social interaction, biology, and physics.[1]:
https://www.ias.edu/ideas/2014/lens-of-computation-workshop[2]:
http://theory.cs.berkeley.edu/computational-lens.html
 
komali2 - 1 hours ago
I absolutely love this way of thinking. We assume that an
"individual" is a single human being, because it's convenient and I
guess because that's how our sentience works. But realistically,
the body itself is an extraordinarily complicated mass of "human"
cells often at odds (see a cake, one part of the brain say "eat
it," another says "dude no you'll get fat"), and thats without
considering the masses of "non-human" entities, such as gut
bacteria, skin bacteria, etc.And then we can go macro - a tribe can
subdivide into gatherers, warriors, and crafters. A city can
specialize further. A country even further. Imagine how different
the life experience would be if humans existed as single entities
alone in endless fields.Then it gets even more fun to consider
interactions with other lifeforms - dogs, plants, cows.Man, what a
cool field of research. I'm glad to hear people are studying this.
 
  lamlam - 13 minutes ago
  > and thats without considering the masses of "non-human"
  entities, such as gut bacteriaActually, there's research that
  suggests that gut bacteria may have more control over our
  decision making then we are aware of. Really interesting
  stuff.[1] http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/gut-
  bacteria-ma...
 
  didibus - 49 minutes ago
  Totally. I've always been surprised that we don't consider how
  our bodies resemble much more a planet, then anything else. We're
  just cells to the earth, and who's to say mother earth isn't
  conscious. Our cells exhibit intelligence, they make their own
  decision and carry out actions independently, yet to our mutual
  harmonious benefit in general, but not always. Nature is much
  more then we make it be.
 
  fredley - 1 hours ago
  You may enjoy the game Everything. While the gameplay is
  straightforward, it's a very beautiful game, and is narrated by
  recordings of the philosopher Alan Watts.
 
jchanimal - 25 minutes ago
 they got data by inducing monkey fights.""" We were interested in
whether we could induce the monkey society we were studying to
change from its status quo of many small fights and a few large
ones to having many large fights. We observed that fights in this
monkey group range in size from two to 30 or so individuals, with
small fights common and large fights very rare. By simulating the
society using data we had collected on fight-joining decisions, we
found that we could measure the number of monkeys whose propensity
to join fights would have to increase to move the system closer to
the critical point.
 
  openasocket - 17 minutes ago
  That sounds like they were just simulating the society based on
  data they had gathered about their fights. So not inducing monkey
  fights, just observing the monkeys fighting naturally and
  extrapolating from there. Though earlier in the article they
  allude to removing a few members of the society and showing the
  fights increased.Also it should be noted that fighting is a very
  common part of monkey behavior. If you observe these groups in
  the wild individuals are almost constantly challenging and
  checking others to maintain or advance their position in the
  social hierarchy.