GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-07) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Lessons from my first year of live coding on Twitch
75 points by ingve
https://medium.com/@suzhinton/lessons-from-my-first-year-of-live...
___________________________________________________________________
 
rmccoy6435 - 1 hours ago
I have live streamed some stuff before when coding, and I must say
most of the people who come into a channel doing coding are really
nice people who ask really insightful question, or offer good
solutions. It's like Mob Programming with the internet (or as the
author here says an "MMOPP"), and it also makes me a better
programmer because before I even think about writing any code I'm
thinking about how it will be perceived by someone else peering
over my shoulder (akin to the pro arguments for TDD).
 
nightcracker - 1 hours ago
If you are programming, especially in a live studio environment,
you should really invest into multiple monitors.
 
  elif - 1 hours ago
  if you're trying to present to viewers, two monitors will make
  keeping them focused into a ridiculous chore.That is like telling
  a speaker to prepare two slide decks and switch between them
  during the talk.
 
    minimaxir - 5 minutes ago
    Using a second monitor for live streaming is more useful for
    things useful to the streamer but which do not need to be shown
    on screen to readers (e.g. frantic Stack Overflow research when
    the code breaks, or analytics as the article mentions).
 
    oneeyedpigeon - 17 minutes ago
    I don't know much about streaming, but having watched lots of
    twitch channels, I think some streamers use one screen for
    stream display, and the other for everything they want to see
    but don't want the viewers to see e.g. chat, sensitive stuff,
    etc.
 
      ue_ - 12 minutes ago
      That's exactly what I do when streaming Overwatch, especially
      when my friend talks to me via IRC and I reply with voice.
      That said my monitor is big enough to have both the game and
      IRC visible, and I could set OBS just to record the game.
 
  ekimekim - 1 hours ago
  The author mentioned several times that they tried a second
  monitor, and it just wasn't their thing. And that's ok.Everyone
  has different preferences and something that works great for you
  (and me - I have a 4-monitor setup right now and loving it) isn't
  necessarily what works great for everyone.
 
Kiro - 1 hours ago
I want to do this but I'm afraid of two things:1. Show how horrible
my code is.2. Accidentally leaking sensitive stuff.
 
  avitzurel - 1 hours ago
  1. Stop 2. Just use a part of your screen that is off the
  recording. Never open `.` files on the stream. Never login on the
  screen, always off of the screen. If you are showing AWS cli
  console stuff, make sure you hide the public IPs and public DNS
  of things.
 
    Kiro - 47 minutes ago
    2 is related to 1 - there are credentials hard coded all over
    the place.
 
      avitzurel - 35 minutes ago
      so stream another project.As a habit, I don't stream code
      related to my workplace, it has too many risks. Even if you
      see parts and pieces and will not be able to make sense of
      it.We don't have a single secret embedded in code and all of
      our secret files are encrypted using vault, even that is too
      risky for the clients we have.I stream my personal projects
      and things like QnA etc...
 
avitzurel - 1 hours ago
I started streaming a few months back and I absolutely love it.Some
solid tips on here and OBS is a surprisingly good piece of software
but it can be a resource hog at times.The hardest thing about it is
to keep the schedule and be emotionally available when the stream
comes on. I wrote about it here [1].What I like the most is working
through a project in stages on the stream. People can connect with
the project and also contribute to it. Working on one-offs tutorial
style did not really work for me.I stream full stack content. From
Node.js to Golang and even Devops. [2]The screen to not show the
desktop when doing secret things is good, however, as mentioned
here I would definitely recommend a second screen. It changes the
way you work a lot.[1] https://fullstack.network/announcing-my-
most-ambitious-strea...[2] https://www.twitch.tv/kensodev
 
  eropple - 1 hours ago
  > Some solid tips on here and OBS is a surprisingly good piece of
  software but it can be a resource hog at times."Hog" implies
  bloat to me? Video's hard work, though, and OBS will chew a CPU
  but it really needs to (unless you use a GPU encoding solution
  like NVENC, but there are quality concerns there). I have a
  second PC--actually a pretty nice 4U rackmount in a 6U wheelie
  with my audio interface--dedicated to video crunching and audio
  mixing for when I do livestreaming events for folks.
 
    avitzurel - 45 minutes ago
    I use a 2017 iMac 5K with 32G memory and quad core and OBS is
    absolutely a lightweight for this one.Before, I was using a
    2015 MBP and it was having a VERY hard time handling the
    streaming at 1080P (mind you I was running 2 screens off of
    it).I am not sure it's a hog because of bloat, it's just that
    you need a more than average computer to stream with good
    quality.Funny story is that once I clicked stop on the stream
    and it kept streaming. Showing me having a phone call, going on
    Facebook and just continuing with my day. I had to just shut
    down my computer because OBS would just not stop.On the new
    iMac I had absolutely zero issues with it and I am running it
    with 2 screens and 5K on the main screen.
 
      eropple - 37 minutes ago
      Fair enough. I also run an NDI sync, a browser overlay, and a
      bunch of cameras, which probably adds to the load.
 
    lgas - 37 minutes ago
    I think the implication with Hog is just that it's greedy and
    will consume as much resources as you give it.
 
      eropple - 27 minutes ago
      It doesn't do that, though--OBS uses pretty well-understood
      levels of memory, compute, etc. that scale directly to what
      you're doing.
 
jzelinskie - 30 minutes ago
I've streamed myself programming on Twitch, and can echo some
additional knowledge in addition to what's shared in the
article:Don't expect anyone from Twitch to randomly discover your
stream and have any idea what you're doing. Programming anything
that isn't a video game on Twitch will be totally unfamiliar to
their primary demographics. That said, use Twitter or something
else to BRING YOUR OWN AUDIENCE. Be prepared to stream for a few
hours or else you will likely never build up traction in your
chat.As this post says, vocalizing your stream of consciousness is
vital; think of it like pair programming with the chat. I try to
engage the chat without getting totally nerd sniped and ending up
off topic.I think the best way to really kick the tires on Twitch
programming content off would be to stream podcasts and/or have a
joint channel of shared programming content and have many different
programmers participating either via a shared account or Twitch
Teams[0].[0]: https://twitchtips.com/twitch-teams/
 
gallerdude - 25 minutes ago
I'm really inarticulate, so my biggest fear would be people not
able to understand what I'm saying...
 
  jonlawlor - 1 minutes ago
  Then live coding might be a way to improve that skill and get
  over your fear!  Nothing feels quite like facing a fear head on.
 
ioddly - 1 hours ago
This is an interesting topic to me, as I'm giving a talk with some
coding in two weeks and a major concern of mine has been making
sure that what I'm doing is interesting and more importantly
followable. Normal coding for me just is a flurry of vim
activity.Questions for anyone who does this or views these sorts of
streams:Do you find that people can follow what's happening in vim
well enough? I've considered just using plain VSCode because I'm
concerned jumping around too much as I do normally might be hard to
follow.Do you feel that this might be good interview practice as
well, since the process of explaining code as we write it doesn't
come naturally to some of us?Any additional tips to make sure what
I'm doing is comprehensible would be appreciated.
 
  avitzurel - 1 hours ago
  Talk!Just talk your mouth off, seriously. It's the best tip I can
  give you to make it interactive.You gonna open a file and do
  something, say it, don't just do it. When you are thinking of a
  problem, ask for suggestions from the crowd/viewers...Also,
  ProTip. Vim is a problem if you navigate really quickly along
  splits (like you should), people lose focus and will just stop
  following.I switched to Atom for my last stream (I hate every
  minute of it) but it slows me down enough so people can follow
  better.Hope this helps
 
    StavrosK - 20 minutes ago
    Huh, that's very good advice. I would never have thought about
    slowing myself down, but now that you mentioned it, it makes
    perfect sense.
 
dsjoerg - 1 hours ago
Thanks for this ? I've been thinking about doing the same thing and
this is super helpful.