GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-07) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How 'Wellness' Became an Epidemic
19 points by prostoalex
https://www.thecut.com/2017/06/how-wellness-became-an-epidemic.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
taxicabjesus - 45 minutes ago
A 90's Aerosmith song goes, "There's something wrong with the world
today, I don't know what it is..." I don't know either, but I've a
few observations...With regard to the "wellness" industry. Mostly
it's a sham, but so too are many medical treatments. Women are
particularly vulnerable to medical profiteering - I posted about
this yesterday [1]...[1]
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14708472  There?s something
grotesque about this    industry?s emerging at the moment when the
most    basic health care is still being denied to so    many in
America and is at risk of being    snatched away from millions
more.   People are focused on Wellness because they're not getting
it from their doctors. Sometimes a conventional medical
practitioner's diagnosis is helpful, but usually they miss the big
picture.I took lots of people to & from their doctor appointments.
Sometimes all a person really needed was to feel safe, but their
doctors couldn't prescribe that. So they'd go from doctor to doctor
to doctor looking for answers, but never finding them.  But what?s
perhaps most striking about    wellness?s ascendancy is that it?s
happening     because, in our increasingly bifurcated world,
even those who do have access to pretty good    (and sometimes
quite excellent, if quite    expensive) traditional health care are
left    feeling, nonetheless, incredibly unwell.  This section
reminds me of one passenger in particular... She wanted help, and
had a few resources, but her doctors only made her condition worse.
Sometimes doctors do good work, sometimes they don't know when to
stop. "Wellness" is for those who've given up on conventional
medicine.
 
  zzalpha - 36 minutes ago
  "Wellness" is for those who've given up on conventional
  medicine.You mean, given up on medicine.All this other stuff?
  It's not medicine.  It's snake oil.  Chicanery.  Placebo wrapped
  up in meaningless ritual to make it "feel" real.  It's the new
  iteration of numerology, tarot, psychic reading.The only thing
  that it, in some cases, brings to the mix is empathy, something
  frequently missing in our overburdened medical system.  And in
  that respect it has value.But medicine?  That it is not, unless
  you define "medicine" as anything that makes you feel better, in
  which case you've basically robbed the term of its meaning.
 
    mathperson - 7 minutes ago
    I am surprised a comment this correct to be down voted down on
    hn. I thought this place tried to be evidence based...
 
    taxicabjesus - 23 minutes ago
    You must have missed this ProPublica piece:When Evidence Says
    No, but Doctors Say Yes - https://www.propublica.org/article
    /when-evidence-says-no-but...There's a slander against
    "alternative medicine" that goes something like, "What do you
    call alternative medicine that works? Medicine. " The inference
    is that Medicine adopts what's useful. If a herb is actually
    useful, the pharmaceutical industry will figure out what the
    active ingredient is and figure out how to synthesize it,
    etc.My corollary to the slander is the truism: "What do you
    call medicine that doesn't work? Medicine. " The ProPublica
    story linked above says that heart stents [are now known to not
    be] helpful for anyone that's not actively experiencing a heart
    attack, but thousands get inserted every year anyways.[edit -
    clarification [] above]
 
      StavrosK - 5 minutes ago
      Why do you care about what doesn't work? If the things that
      work are in the set "Medicine", that's the only set we need
      to be concerned with.Sure, it's worthwhile to try and figure
      out which medicine doesn't work, but we know for sure that
      anything non-medicine does, by definition, not work.
 
Mz - 30 minutes ago
I can't manage to read this entire thing, not just because it is
long, but because it is so sneering. Study after study after study
indicates that diet, exercise and lifestyle have measurable impacts
on morbidity and a long list of serious, often deadly, conditions.
But if you actually try to advocate that people attend to their
health first and foremost by eating right, exercising and making
good lifestyle choices, you are some crazy weirdo?I don't think it
is any mystery at all that it is happening alongside so many people
not having access to proper insurance, doctors, etc. If you can't
afford to go to a doctor, then reading something for free on the
internet and tweaking your diet in hopes of not needing a doctor
makes all kinds of sense.
 
  darawk - 9 minutes ago
  While true, almost everything peddled on Goop is snake oil and
  pseudoscience. It deserves to be sneered at.
 
  andreyk - 8 minutes ago
  The writing is a bit sneering and sarcastic, but I think it's
  pretty clear this is entirely about the new-agey-too-expensive-
  shady-pseudo-science kind of wellness and not about eating right
  and excercising. And this is not at all about  people who can't
  afford insurance - the tagline is "Why are so many privileged
  people feeling so sick? Luckily, there?s no shortage of cures.".
 
  lambda - 2 minutes ago
    But if you actually try to advocate that people attend to
  their health first and foremost by eating right,    exercising
  and making good lifestyle choices, you are some   crazy weirdo?
  I don't think that's what the article was sneering at.It was
  sneering at the idea of fearmongering about what people eat, but
  then trying to sell them on a whole bunch of unregulated
  supplements and quack remedies.There is an awful lot of
  "something free on the internet" that is just complete bullshit
  designed to sell you something.
 
devoply - 1 hours ago
My theory is that it's because simply operating in the social
hierarchy is sickening. There are many things that you want that
are totally not under your control but under the control of other
people often for no good reason. So it's best never ever to
interact with the social hierarchy unless you absolutely have to
and specifically for money. And even then force your own rules to
get the money. Dave Chapelle is an excellent example of how to deal
with the entertainment industry.This article is a good example of
how participating in the social hierarchy and letting them tell you
what your needs are and how to behave is ludicrous. It's mostly
just bullshit sold by leaders because of their esteemed status in
the hierarchy.In the past leaders sometimes deformed their skulls
from childhood to differentiate themselves from the masses, this is
an example of that same sort of behavior.
 
  ktRolster - 49 minutes ago
  I think you have an interesting point, but I have no idea what
  you're saying. What would "deforming their own skulls" correspond
  to in modern society?
 
    devoply - 41 minutes ago
    The high social classes to visualize the fact that they were
    different from the people they ruled deformed their own skulls.
    Or certain tribes deformed their own skulls to differentiate
    themselves from other tribes. It seems to be just some stupid
    arbitrary thing that they do to differentiate themselves. Sort
    of like wearing a bunch of rings around your neck to elongate
    it because it's beautiful.
 
  [deleted]
 
bpodgursky - 1 hours ago
When nobody (aka the privileged class described here) has real
problems or responsibilities anymore (no kids until late 30s, if
then, no shortage of money for healthy food and housing) you focus
on the trivial problems that earlier generations would have laughed
at.