GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Base-4 fractions in Telugu
74 points by pavel_lishin
http://blog.plover.com/math/telugu.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
vorg - 2 hours ago
> the digits for 3 have either three horizonal strokes ? or three
vertical strokes ?, and the others similarly. I have an idea that
the alternating vertical-horizontal system might have served as an
error-detection mechanismThe Chinese Suzhou numerals use
alternating ??? and ??? but for a different reason:    "21" is
written as "??" instead of "??" which can be confused with "3" (?)
from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzhou_numerals
 
jacobolus - 1 hours ago
There are several changes I?d make to the number system if I could.
Chief among them:(1) Try to mostly use a positional system in
speech as well as writing. This saves a lot of time because "three
five nine" is a lot easier to say than "three hundred fifty-nine",
removes a huge amount of confusing irregularity, and overall makes
life much nicer for children just learning. While we?re at it,
scrap percentages.(2) Allow signed digits, and give the negative
versions their own unambiguous names. It?s amazingly convenient to
be able to have a way to directly express e.g. 200 ? 3 without
needing to call it 197. Students should learn to convert between an
all-positive-digit form of a number and a round-via-truncation form
of the number, and generally use the latter in most practical
circumstances.For more on this point see
http://ethw.org/Ancient_Computers(3) ? a pipe dream ? general use
of base twelve, and in particular use of binary logarithms
(?doublings?, ?bits?, ?octaves?) written using duodecimal
fractions.Using alternate bases can be nice, and binary divisions
are a lot more useful than division by 5 ? especially for e.g.
measuring circular arcs where binary divisions are much easier to
compute because they only require square roots
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_scaling#Binary_angles ? but
these Telugu symbols are too complicated to write for a base 4
system to use for general numeration. If we want divisions by two,
hexadecimal (with appropriately redesigned glyphs) is better.
 
  ggambetta - 1 hours ago
  "Three five nine" is easier to say than "three hundred and fifty-
  nine", but the second option lets me have an order-of-magnitude
  number from the start. Take "one seven nine five four two zero
  eight three". Are you keeping track of how many digits you're
  hearing? "one hundred seventy nine million, <...don't need to pay
  attention to the rest...>".But you did say "mostly". Are you
  thinking "one seven nine million, five four two thousands, zero
  eight three" or something like that?
 
    jacobolus - 33 minutes ago
    If it were up to me, all the digit names would be one syllable,
    and the order of magnitude would get its own syllable (or a
    few, for very large/small numbers) up front. Basically a
    verbalization of scientific notation, but with the exponent
    leading.This could be safely dropped for numbers of less than a
    few digits. "Two six" or "eight one four" is not going to be
    ambiguous/confusing.
 
netvarun - 3 hours ago
Off-topic: The plover.com domain caught my eye. He is the author of
'Higher Order Perl'[1][2], which is to this date, one of my most
favorite programming language books I've read and my first (and
imho, best) introduction to functional programming. The book is
free to download![1] http://hop.perl.plover.com/ [2]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higher-Order_Perl
 
  throwaway7645 - 1 hours ago
  HOP is awesome!
 
eponeponepon - 3 hours ago
Telugu's a spectacular language - it's ancient, it's spoken by tens
of millions of people, it has its own cinema industry and an
enormous literary corpus reaching back to before English even
existed... and yet almost nobody outside the subcontinent even
knows it exists.
 
  btbytes - 3 hours ago
  Same with Tamil, Kannada, Bengali, Malayalam etc.,
 
    [deleted]
 
    vorg - 2 hours ago
    > an enormous literary corpus reaching back to before English
    even existedCertainly true of Telegu, Tamil, Kannada, and
    Malayalam. But because Bengali is, like English, an Indo-
    European language, not true of it. Also, not sure what you mean
    by "etc".
 
      nine_k - 1 minutes ago
      Sanskrit is also Indo-European, and definitely had a large
      literary corpus before English became separate from Old
      Norse.
 
    gressquel - 1 hours ago
    Tamil is a classical language like greek, hebrew, chinese etc.
    Its much older than telugu and the other Indian languages.
    Malayalam and kanada is derived from tamil
 
[deleted]