GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Transfer of atomic mass with a photon solves the momentum paradox
of light
197 points by metafunctor
http://physics.aalto.fi/en/current/news/2017-06-30/
___________________________________________________________________
 
GolDDranks - 9 hours ago
"Presently the Hubble?s law is explained by Doppler shift being
larger from distant stars. This effectively supports the hypothesis
of expanding universe. In the mass polariton theory of light this
hypothesis is not needed since redshift becomes automatically
proportional to the distance from the star to the observer?,
explains Professor Jukka Tulkki."If this proves to be true, is
there a chance that our whole picture of the expanding cosmos needs
a full revisiting?
 
  ninkendo - 9 hours ago
  Such an explanation for observed redshift apparently comes up
  again and again, but thus far hasn't held up to experiment... it
  even had a name: "tired light".
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tired_lightIt'll be interesting to
  see if this sparks new debate on the subject.
 
    mannykannot - 8 hours ago
    'Tired light' appears to be an umbrella term for various
    disparate theories that are only related in their attempt to
    provide an alternative explanation for red shift. If this
    particular hypothesis, which is not explicitly cosmological, is
    validated in terrestrial experiments, I think its cosmological
    implications would be unavoidable.
 
      gus_massa - 8 hours ago
      > is validated in terrestrial experimentsThey didn't run any
      experiments. They only have some a theoretical model and
      simulations in the computer.The main part of the article,
      that says that the momentum of the light is split in the
      photon and in the density wave looks good. (It almost looks
      obvious, but it's not my expertise area https://xkcd.com/793/
      .)The relation with the Hubble constant is totally
      unexpected. It is not in the abstract of the peer review
      article. (I can't read the full text.) So it's probably only
      a declaration for the press release. Take it with a grain of
      salt.
 
        sethrin - 3 hours ago
        The article like nearly every physical article has its
        preprint available on the
        arxiv.https://arxiv.org/abs/1603.07224note: "on the arxiv"
        and not "on arxiv". The name puns on x => greek letter chi.
 
    sillysaurus3 - 5 hours ago
    Without an expanding universe, one problem is "How does
    everything form, given that gravity exists?"No expansion =
    everything falls together.
 
      lanna - 3 hours ago
      not if the universe is flat and simply connected (i.e,
      infinite): https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/109063
      /how-come-...
 
    nothis - 7 hours ago
    If it's proven true, though, would that mean the "expanding
    universe" theory would be disproved as well?
 
      GolDDranks - 7 hours ago
      Not necessarily. It might be that this effect is real (this
      was a computational simulation so an experimental
      verification is needed.) and needs to be accounted when doing
      cosmology. But it might very well account just a part of the
      redshift, and the remainder then needs to be accounted by
      something else, the default explanation being the expanding
      universe.Edit: A clarification: I'm not an expert.
 
      [deleted]
 
      [deleted]
 
  sandworm101 - 9 hours ago
  But only if interstellar mass is evenly distributed... which it
  isnt.  If this is to replace hubble we should see differences in
  redshift where the light passes through more matter.  There
  should be differences between redshift distance measurements and
  other non-redshift distances.  That shouldnt be too hard to
  detect (or not).
 
    guscost - 4 hours ago
    Isn't the CMBR remarkably uniform in all directions? Does that
    matter?
 
    simonh - 8 hours ago
    It could be extremely hard. We don't have many good ways to
    measure how far away objects are in space. In fact the main way
    we have been estimating distance so far is by measuring red
    shift. We also have very limited means for measuring the
    density of the intergalactic medium.I just don't think we have
    any good ways to distinguish whether a high redshift is due to
    the object being very distant or the intergalactic medium in
    that direction being particularly dense, for most objects.
 
      empath75 - 8 hours ago
      There are type Ia supernovas that can give precise distances,
      no?
 
        marcosdumay - 7 hours ago
        They give very precise distances by red-shift
        calculations.There's no direct way to measure the distance
        of very far objects. There's only red-shift and Hubble's
        Law.
 
          FeatureRush - 4 hours ago
          Wasn't it the other way around? A type of supernovas
          ("standard candles") were discovered before the expansion
          and used to discover the expansion? The formula for
          distance only uses absolute and apparent magnitudes to
          calculate distance?
 
          empath75 - 1 hours ago
          Yeah they calibrated red shift from standard candles.
 
      sandworm101 - 7 hours ago
      There are some very good ways.  Thats how redshifting was
      proven in the first place.  Cephiads (sp), pulsing stars,
      were used to prove that galaxies were a thing.  They give
      very accurate distances at ranges where redshift is
      detectable.
 
      strainer - 8 hours ago
      I guess the geometry of galactic filaments may be examined
      for distortions/textures relating to non-standard red
      shifting. We may see the filaments are bent from our
      viewpoint in accordance with the presence of voids or other
      filaments along the way.
 
  65827 - 9 hours ago
  Yeah this seems to be happening more and more often. I guess this
  is it.
 
  henearkr - 7 hours ago
  I don't see how it is pertinent, as space is not "a transparent
  medium", it is void. Pretty much all the photons emitted by a
  star that we can detect cross only the star's gas surrounding,
  then the emptiness of space, then our atmosphere. So, it does not
  vary with the distance of the star, thus the author's argument
  does not hold (anyway, he was being super-speculative here).
 
    fpoling - 7 hours ago
    The space is not void as there is non-zero density of matter
    that we see in absorbtion lines of quasars [1]. This implies
    that the space has to be treated as transparent medium with
    non-trivial optical properties.[1]  -
    https://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/Madau6/Madau_contents.ht...
 
      henearkr - 3 hours ago
      Ok, now I agree with you:
      https://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/Madau6/Madau2.html
 
    zamalek - 7 hours ago
    > it is voidSpace is not a complete vacuum.
 
      henearkr - 7 hours ago
      Yeah, but sufficiently so that most photons are not
      encountering any other things on their way.
 
        Nomentatus - 3 hours ago
        Not clear - have you taken virtual particles into account?
 
      henearkr - 3 hours ago
      Well, actually it seems you are true. There are absorption
      rays for the inter-galactic medium, as shown in:
      https://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/Madau6/Madau2.html So,
      please ignore my previous reply ?
 
  aroberge - 1 hours ago
  No, there are too many observations that are consistent with an
  expanding universe.  For example, primordial nucleosynthesis [1]
  would either not have occurred in a non-expanding universe, or
  would not have stopped so soon.  In fact, it can be used to show
  that it is consistent with having only 3 families of light
  neutrino species.[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bang_nucleosynthesisSome
  relatively small effects of so-called "tired-light" scenario
  could likely be accommodated, but it would not change the main
  picture.
 
  chairmanwow - 5 hours ago
  The reckless child in me wants to jump for joy at the absurdity
  of having a long-held tenent of my understanding of the universe
  shattered. The quiet pragmatist is begging for the reserved "Well
  let's wait and see". I didn't expect an article on recent
  developments in computational physics to render such an emotional
  reaction. Either way, a very thought provoking article!
 
  mirimir - 8 hours ago
  I believe that emission and absorption lines are also shifted.
  Wavelength-dependent absorption by intervening gas wouldn't do
  that.
 
jessaustin - 9 hours ago
Seems important:Presently the Hubble?s law is explained by Doppler
shift being larger from distant stars. This effectively supports
the hypothesis of expanding universe. In the mass polariton theory
of light this hypothesis is not needed since redshift becomes
automatically proportional to the distance from the star to the
observer?, explains Professor Jukka Tulkki.
 
adamnemecek - 8 hours ago
Does anyone know how they made the pictures? In particular this one
http://physics.aalto.fi/en/midcom-serveattachmentguid-1e75d6...
 
  wohlergehen - 4 hours ago
  ParaView would be a possibility. Many tools can export VTK files
  for it.
 
  Kelteseth - 6 hours ago
  Some 3d software like blender maybe?http://blender.org/
 
    semi-extrinsic - 2 hours ago
    Don't know why you were downvoted. Doing e.g. dataset -> .vtk
    file -> ParaView to add whatever vectors, color maps, surfaces
    etc. you want -> .obj file -> Blender to do final lighting,
    coloring and raytrace isn't unheard of. I've seen it done
    several times in CFD, and I've done it myself.It becomes a bit
    of a pain for animating datasets, since you need to do Blender
    scripting with Python which is far from intuitive. But it's
    doable.Having said that, this doesn't look like Blender.
 
  BrandonSmithJ - 5 hours ago
  Fairly certain it's done using mayavi -
  http://docs.enthought.com/mayavi/mayavi/index.html
 
    adamnemecek - 5 hours ago
    This looks something I've been looking for. Are there some
    products (commercial sw, or libraries) in this space?
 
      BrandonSmithJ - 5 hours ago
      I'm unsure about the commercial licensing aspect of it if
      that's what you're asking, but mayavi has both a GUI
      interface as well as a scripting interface depending on how
      you want to use it. In my experience it's essentially the
      library to use for 3D plotting when matplotlib isn't cutting
      it.(I just checked wikipedia and it seems it's released under
      BSD license. Unsure if other products available which are
      built on top of it)
 
k2xl - 8 hours ago
EL5? What is the paradox of light?
 
  metafunctor - 8 hours ago
  That is explained in the second paragraph of the article:In the
  literature, there has existed two different values for the
  momentum of light in the transparent medium. Typically, these
  values differ by a factor of ten and this discrepancy is known as
  the momentum paradox of light.
 
    lisper - 7 hours ago
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham?Minkowski_controversy if
    you want the gory details.However, IMO none of these
    explanations are particularly satisfying because none of them
    (AFAICT) explain where these two different formulations come
    from.  They all leave you with the impression that two
    physicists just pulled two different equations out of their ass
    and now they're arguing over which one is right as if it were
    some sort of theological discussion.  (This is a common problem
    in physics pedagogy.)  I would really love to hear from a
    physicist who understands and can explain the basis for the two
    different formulations.
 
webnrrd2k - 3 hours ago
if you would like some background on this question, as I do, there
is a SE discussion that makes it a bit
easier...https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/3189/is-the-
abra...There is a summary statement that I found to be especially
helpful in framing the question:"To summarize... it's probably OK
to "redo" the budget in such a way that a part of the momentum of
the photon is attributed to the dielectric material when the photon
enters it, and then it is returned back to the photon. In this way,
one may justify the Abraham's form - and probably many other forms
- but why should one really do it?"