GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-07-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Minitel: The Online World France Built Before the Web
278 points by sohkamyung
http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/networks/minitel-the-online-w...
___________________________________________________________________
 
mrkrab - 13 hours ago
Don't forget about Infov?a in Spain, too, even though that was much
later.
 
  gaius - 13 hours ago
  And Prestel in the UK, but it was never as ubiquitous as le
  Minitel.
 
    tobltobs - 12 hours ago
    And Bildschirmtext (BTX) in Germany.
 
  riccardo_gr - 12 hours ago
  And the Videotel by SIP in Italy (a real failure):
  https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Videotel
  http://quartdepomme.fr/quartdepomme/VIDEOTEL_-_MINITEL_%28Up...
 
bane - 24 minutes ago
Quick question for those who remember the time. What was BBSing
like back in the Minitel days?In the States and other places
without an equivalent system, BBSs were pretty much the only way to
connect in any kind of "on-line", but as soon as the Web became
widespread BBSs died a very quick death. I would suppose that
Minitel would have prevented an equivalent BBS scene from
developing in France, but I have no idea. I know there were
reasonably big scenes in other parts of Europe though.
 
fermigier - 13 hours ago
"and dudes (mecs in French) browsed the personal ads at 3615 MEC."
<- Something was lost in the translation there.
 
  agumonkey - 13 hours ago
  You mean they weren't explicit enough in the article ?Funny the
  company behind is still here https://goo.gl/2YGfuq (SFW)
 
  raverbashing - 13 hours ago
  What was lost exactly? The reference to MEC is explained
 
    dtech - 10 hours ago
    Your sibling comment links the current website. Apparently it's
    a gay dating service. Wasn't clear to me from the article.
 
      raverbashing - 6 hours ago
      Ah that wasn't clear to me either.
 
genericacct - 10 hours ago
Credit where credit is due: the french invented fembots
 
slau - 13 hours ago
A company I worked for used to host Minitel services. In
particular, it was a system to handle driving test allotments,
reservations and cancellations between the government
("Pr?fecture") and the driving schools.The service was provided for
free to the government, the company organised free training
sessions for government clerks, and it was the driving schools who
paid for the service when dialling into our minitel servers.It
technically wasn't a monopoly, because the driving schools could
still go down to the pr?fecture, and do everything using the
forms/pen/paper.The company tried on a number of occasions to get
the driving schools to move from the Minitel service to the new web
version. Every single time, there was a huge push-back from the
driving school unions, about how expensive the new service was, and
how "unusable" the website was, compared to the Minitel.We even had
people calling in, saying that we were extortionists. "We've been
using this for over 20 years, and never paid a cent; now you want
us to pay xx? a month?" I guess some of them really didn't look at
their phone bill.I heard about 4 or 5 "planned terminations" of the
Minitel service during my stint from 2010 to 2015. France
Telecom/Orange even provides a "Minitel over IP" service these
days, where a website can be enrolled into their payment service,
and users pay per minute on the website. It's a superb scam tool
(just have a hidden iframe open a pay-as-you-go page), and Orange
is constantly fighting the fraudsters.
 
  peter303 - 9 hours ago
  Many virtual terminals still default to the 80 character lines of
  punchcards. The new contains or emulates the old.
 
  agumonkey - 13 hours ago
  Talking about migrations, I worked at two places (tax office, and
  large store) that were transitioning from AX400 minitel like
  interface to the web. Every time it was a disaster. I was much
  enamored by the old system that was hyper efficient, both at the
  low level (zero bandwidth, fixed layout) and at higher level too,
  all that wasn't spent on visuals and gimmicks was used for
  "smart" features, semantic suggestions, math auto correct on the
  fly. Also almost no learning phase. Sad.
 
    kartan - 4 hours ago
    > that were transitioning from AX400 minitel like interface to
    the web. Every time it was a disaster.Usually the first service
    is build in an Agile manner. It starts small, and more and more
    features are added as years pass by. Then some one decides to
    create a complete new system from scratch, and they never
    realize all the hidden complexity that exists in the original
    solution. So this second waterfall project fails and needs
    years to become usable.Happened something like that in this
    case? :)
 
      agumonkey - 2 hours ago
      Can't say, I wasn't working on this, I just witnessed it.My
      best guess is that nobody wanted to maintain the old so IT
      decided to surrender to the latest enterprise fad.
 
  raverbashing - 13 hours ago
  This reminds me of the coin operated ice machines that the
  luddities would pay instead of their ice delivery guy (ignorant
  of the fact the machine was running on their
  electricity)Technicaly it would be like rent but I wouldn't be
  surprised if some paid for the machine several times
 
  digi_owl - 9 hours ago
  I can understand this. I keep seeing examples of people
  cherishing the largely keyboard operated ANSI/ASCII interfaces
  because once they had the navigation keys internalized, they
  could operate them largely without looking.And frankly HN
  regulars should not be surprised. Just look at the continued love
  for tiling window managers and terminals for development work.
  Never mind the "minimalism" of HN itself, largely consisting of
  text.
 
    pygy_ - 9 hours ago
    In the same vein, the Nokia 32/3310 could be navigated easily
    without looking. There were four buttons, a pair of arrows, ok,
    and cancel. A real, pure touch interface provided you could
    memorize the button sequences.Later models with 4 directions
    and spatial menus were a step backwards in terms of usability
    IMO. I always had to look to ensure I hadn't accidentally
    clicked a corner and moved in diagonal.
 
      digi_owl - 9 hours ago
      Best i recall, the full dpad and such came because of J2ME
      requirements. the specs for that expected at minimum two soft
      buttons and a dpad.
 
srge - 13 hours ago
It was great for "piracy". You had message board where people would
swap floppies. You basically copied a game (Atari ST games of
course) and would send the floppies hoping your counterpart would
do the same.It was a great time and I learnt a lot about the geek
community, the sharing and got access to many games which at age 15
I could not afford.
 
  digi_owl - 10 hours ago
  Elsewhere one made do with classified ads in computer magazines.I
  wish i could find the story i read once from a guy in GB that did
  so for the Amiga, and found himself so inundated with replies
  that he bought himself a second drive for his A500 and spend
  whole weekends swapping floppies.
 
    bigbugbag - 7 hours ago
    That's what I wanted to point out, classified had much more
    traction than minitel to swap disks.
 
ekianjo - 13 hours ago
Is this just me or are we getting more and more articles about the
Minitel on HN these days?
 
  agumonkey - 13 hours ago
  Not only HN, I think it's been on reddit too. It's odd since the
  service has been removed entirely a few years ago and already got
  coverage at that time.Maybe the issues with net neutrality push
  people into history. Similarly there were Ethernet stories last
  week.
 
    fit2rule - 11 hours ago
    Yeah, I tend to think that we're all looking for an alternative
    to the looming destruction of the Internet that is inevitably
    going to happen when Net-neutrality dies.As an older user, I'd
    love it if we could figure out a way to resurrect
    Minitel/Teletext and use it as a way of routing around the
    damage that is coming from the political classes.
 
      zer0tonin - 10 hours ago
      Minitel wasn't exactly net neutrality friendly.
 
      ekianjo - 10 hours ago
      >  for an alternative to the looming destruction of the
      Internet that is inevitably going to happen when Net-
      neutrality dies.The Minitel was the archetype of service
      centralization with a single hardware provider. Hardly a good
      case for Net neutrality.
 
        llsf - 3 hours ago
        Yes, very centralized, but in early 80's with telco
        companies having pretty much a monopoly on their own
        respective market, and practically no standard hardware,
        the Minitel was the best that could be done to get a large
        chunk of the population to go online, make safely online
        transactions, exchange messages, before the Web.Today, 35
        years after with what we know, with a deregulated telco
        environment, with internet protocols and corresponding
        hardware, sure, the Minitel is not ideal for net
        neutrality.  I think it was still a good step, and looking
        back, not a too shabby execution either. Now 35 years
        later, the market brought Android smartphone, which are the
        new commodity for people to go online.
 
        walshemj - 5 hours ago
        yes it was the old central state controlled telephone
        system model a bit like OSI x.400 and x.500 where supposed
        to work.
 
      digi_owl - 9 hours ago
      I think a better option would be BBSs and Fidonet (the latter
      still in operation, iirc).
 
        agumonkey - 6 hours ago
        I think one french dude, once a fidonet hoster, is
        federating independant ISP now.
 
    tnone - 7 hours ago
    I suspect it's just some astroturfing to go along with the
    French start up visa thing.
 
  dghughes - 9 hours ago
  xkcd 10000 rulehttps://xkcd.com/1053/
 
drewmate - 6 hours ago
What was the significance of the '3615' in all the service codes?
Was this just a common prefix like 'www' in web addresses?
 
  ebalit - 6 hours ago
  It was more than a common prefix. More like a portal.
 
  vbernat - 3 hours ago
  It's the short phone number to dial to get access to the portal
  where you enter the name of the service you want. There were
  different ones with different pricing. 3614 was cheaper (no
  revenue for the service I think), 3615 was regular and 3617 was
  expensive (you could buy stuff, like games by staying
  online).While most services were accessible through this portal
  (operated by the French telco), you could also dial a "regular
  number" to access some services ? la BBS.
 
  Renaud - 3 hours ago
  The various services had different peicing tiers. 3615 was the
  most used and would cost a few francs per minutes. Some sites
  would force you to spend some time on their 3615 number so you
  could accumulate 'minutes' of use through the cheaper '3614'
  number. They used that scheme to modulate the cost of their
  service.
 
lloeki - 13 hours ago
A couple historical anecdotes:There was the equivalent of the hug
of death multiple times every year when students were checking
their results, overloading the servers as (tens/hundreds of)
thousands of people tried to furiously dial in simultaneously to
get results from various nationwide exams such as the infamous
Baccalaur?at.In 1981 for the presidential elections, the result was
broadcasted live on the Minitel and showed up live on the news:(On
TV) https://youtu.be/rJHUZNlO9ao(Remastered Minitel output)
https://youtu.be/JIZ_D34J3-IThe Minitel was such a national pride
that the Internet had a hard time piercing through the habits and
the collective mind, setting back France by a couple of years on
that front. Said misplaced pride is also very visible on some other
bad decision making such as forcefully applying national preference
to technology such as Bull computers in the enterprise or Thomson
TO7&MO5 in schools which were ripped apart by the competition
nonetheless. This behavior is still visible today as the government
tried to push for "the French Cloud" by heavily subsidizing
software such as a poor alternative to Dropbox which became Orange
Cloud or looking the other way when Deezer was clearly violating IP
rights by padding its music catalogue as it was missing deals from
the majors. Same goes with banks shunning Apple/Android Pay in
favor of being hell-bent on that sad sad Paylib thing, and various
other similar heavy cases of NIH. I'm tentatively hopeful but very
cautions about that "French SV" thing. Wait&see.
 
  piettes - 8 hours ago
  Or maybe switching from "nothing" to "internet" has way more
  outcomes than switching from "minitel" to "internet", and that's
  why internet took more time to grow in France ? And there might
  be a thousand reasons not to host your data in the USA, and
  that's why they search for local alternative.Stop simplifying
  everything to "French pride", that's just a myth.
 
  danmaz74 - 10 hours ago
  As a non-French, I wouldn't say that being proud of the Minitel
  was misplaced at the beginning, as it was a great accomplishment
  for its time. The problem was sticking to it when a clearly
  superior alternative emerged - reminds me of the "not invented
  here" problem.Regarding "national preference", no EU country is
  big enough to make that work for these kinds of technology; maybe
  the EU as a whole, if there wasn't the big problem of language...
 
    masklinn - 10 hours ago
    > The problem was sticking to it when a clearly superior
    alternative emerged - reminds me of the "not invented here"
    problem.One of the issues here is that the internet was not "a
    clearly superior alternative" as it had some aspects which were
    (and still are) significant downgrades.Monetisation is a big
    one, Minitel had use-time payment very early on ("kiosk"
    services with a 4:2 split between the service and the network
    operator, with multiple price points) and in the early 90s
    added secure standardised CC payment (new models had a CC
    reader/terminal built in).
 
      danmaz74 - 9 hours ago
      Well, if you prefer, let's say "an alternative that was
      obviously going to win on the market".PS As a consumer I find
      it very hard to say that use-time payment is better than flat
      access cost + many different ways to pay depending on what
      you use.
 
        user5994461 - 7 hours ago
        You seem to assume that the internet is flat fee, that is
        historically not the case.The internet was pay by the hour
        or pay by the kB for a very long time. The flat free
        subscriptions only emerged around the 00's.
 
          danmaz74 - 2 hours ago
          My first internet connection was through a 28.8k modem, I
          know very well that it wasn't flat at the time, and
          that's exactly why I said that "pay per minute of use" is
          terrible for consumers compared to today's situation,
          while the OP said: "...as it had some aspects which were
          (and still are) significant downgrades. Monetisation is a
          big one, Minitel had use-time payment very early on"
 
        bigbugbag - 7 hours ago
        It was not obvious that internet was going to win the
        market, there were barely any home computers in France vs a
        few millions minitel, there were pretty much no commercial
        ISP but local non profit ISPs and the national phone
        operator was raking in huge profit from the minitel and had
        no incentive to upgrade its inadequate infrastructure.
 
    kalleboo - 10 hours ago
    There's one example where "national preference" worked for the
    EU as a whole - GSM.
 
      digi_owl - 10 hours ago
      Even before GSM there was NMT, that demonstrated the
      possibility of a single standard for use in multiple
      nations.NMT was analog though and thus much more constrained
      in capacity. And GSM brought us the SIM card, that made
      switching phone or service provider as simple as moving or
      replacing a card.
 
    bigbugbag - 8 hours ago
    I would argue that internet was not a clearly superior
    alternative. Let's just take one simple example:the minitel
    network had solved the problem of income for site provider, no
    need for a broken business model based on invading user privacy
    and collecting as much data as possible.
 
  bengalister - 12 hours ago
  The solutions of the "baccalaureat", high school end of course
  exam were also available online just a few hours after the exam,
  if not immediately after. I still wonder who entered the them and
  how they got them so quickly. I guess some paid teachers who were
  able to get a copy of the exam tests or even illegal copies
  before the exam took place. I remember spending quite some time
  checking all online the solutions of the Math exam.
 
  trumbitta2 - 10 hours ago
  It's a more general attitude, and it's called Autarchy (you may
  know it in its weaker form: NIMB + NIH not invented here).Thank
  Nazifascism for that. Italy had it, but it quickly fade out in
  the 1960's. Spain and France still have it. Hopefully less and
  less as time goes by.
 
    trumbitta2 - 5 hours ago
    I'm sorry if this makes you uncomfortable. It's just true.
 
  gaius - 9 hours ago
  It's a shame the French government doesn't mandate OCaml for all
  their software projects.If the UK government had forced the
  public sector to use Acorn Archimedes instead of crappy PCs we
  would be at least a decade ahead now, maybe two.
 
  bigbugbag - 8 hours ago
  There's quite a few of things that requires sources or debunking
  in here: France being set back by a couple years on the internet
  front due to minitel, misplaced pride and sliding to totally
  different matter, to7/mo5 being ripped apart by competition,
  talking of today government as if it was the same than in the
  1980's.
 
  peter303 - 9 hours ago
  So they just sue giant US software companies for monoply and
  privacy violations. Possibly a bit of not-invented-here
  frustration in those suits.
 
    bigbugbag - 7 hours ago
    Yeah or maybe those US companies are monopolies that heavily
    violate people privacy while engaging in tax fraud.
 
  walshemj - 5 hours ago
  Back when I worked for the UK version of Minitel (Prestel) for
  high profile events such as budget day staff where asked not to
  use it.Thigh as I worked on the Byzantine Prestel billing system
  we had permission to use the budget pages and also listened live
  to the speech  in case the government did something fun like
  change VAT (sales tax) in the middle of the month.
 
  [deleted]
 
  makapuf - 11 hours ago
  I think there indeed is national pride from the French Tech. I
  don't think USA is totally immune from it. How many non USA
  services do US people use ? Of course many were invented here but
  some were not and were reimplememted.
 
    digi_owl - 10 hours ago
    There is also a big "buy American" push in general, as best i
    can tell.
 
      bigbugbag - 7 hours ago
      Isn't "buy American" actually "buy in America something made
      in China" ? Walmart is such an example.
 
      nradov - 9 hours ago
      "Buy American" mostly only applies to the federal government.
      Everywhere else it's mostly just talk.
 
        dghughes - 9 hours ago
        I'm not from the USA but I do live in the Americas so
        technically buy American means anywhere in this region  ;)
 
          briandear - 7 hours ago
          Actually technically it doesn?t. America is the short
          name of the United States of America. North America is a
          continent. South America is a continent. There is no such
          place as ?America? unless you are referring to the United
          States. ?Americans? refers to the nationality of one from
          the United States. It?s the adjective describing
          ?something from the United States.?I have never heard
          anyone in Brazil refer to themselves as American. That?s
          just nonsense and no product from Paraguay is stamped
          with Hecho en America.Interestingly, people from the US
          or Canada are referred to as North Americans by Mexicans
          ? despite Mexico being in North America.
 
          digi_owl - 7 hours ago
          Note the use of America_s_. The s there is something i
          have seen often used to encompass all the nations of the
          American continent.
 
          dghughes - 5 hours ago
           Yes.Africa = AfricansEurope = EuropeansAsian =
          AsiansAmericas = ?
 
          [deleted]
 
wolfgangK - 7 hours ago
Fond memories of programming my Amiga to scrap pages from the
Minitel to fill up up database instead of doing data entry by hand,
as ha been expected of me during my first intership?
 
tormeh - 11 hours ago
Minitel really illustrates my view on the tech business: Go global
or go home. Scale is King.
 
  eli - 9 hours ago
  Or maybe successful tech eventually becomes global. Tech history
  is littered with examples of good companies that failed because
  they expanded too fast
 
  makapuf - 11 hours ago
  Well Minitel tried to go global there was a Californian trial
  (and a country wide scale was unheard or for online services).
 
jim_lawless - 10 hours ago
An effort to bring Minitel-based computing to the masses happened
in Omaha, Nebraska in the early 1990's. The service was named
CommunityLink.  It was a joint venture between U.S. West ( then, a
Regional Bell Operating Company ) and France Telecom.You can see
the overview beginning at minute 16:00 in this episode of the old
TV show The Computer
Chronicles:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwNc1zQ0FpgThe above
episode begins with the Minitel story from France.CommunityLink
didn't really seem to catch on, locally.  We did have a thriving
BBS community at this time and most techies that I knew had
CompuServe accounts.
 
thatguy0900 - 10 hours ago
"Minitel enthusiasts cherished the network?s privacy and anonymity.
In late 1984, Minitel engineers added a feature to the terminal
that saved the last page visited and made it easier for the user to
pick up an interrupted session?as a browser cookie does today. The
public outcry was swift and brutal. Editorials in newspapers, which
(rightly) saw Minitel as a competitor, warned that Big Brother had
arrived. Some 3,000 terminals were returned in protest. The PTT
soon dropped this feature." Pretty sad to see where we've come
since then
 
  walshemj - 5 hours ago
  Privacy lol I bet France telecom could look at every thing and as
  it was tied to the phone line it wasn't very anonymous.
 
  digi_owl - 9 hours ago
  I think the basic problem is that while back then we had a low
  water mark of privacy, the Soviet Union, that the west wanted to
  stay above as a point of pride, these days we have none.
 
    kalleboo - 8 hours ago
    Well we have China, but western leaders seem to be more prone
    to using the Chinese Great Firewall as a leading example than a
    bad example.
 
      digi_owl - 7 hours ago
      Funnily China seems to be treated more like a capitalist
      oligarchy these days (and may well be operating like one as
      well).The last remaining communist nations to be "feared"
      seems to be Cuba and North Korea.
 
MayeulC - 7 hours ago
For what it's worth, I still have one around here. It makes for a
great retro-terminal that can be plugged on a 1200 bauds serial
connection. I agree that it isn't the most lightweight solution,
but it at least works pretty well, and without hassle.
 
djhworld - 12 hours ago
Was Minitel something only the middle and upper classes had, or was
it a universal thing?I'm from the UK, I didn't get onto the web
until 1999, before that we used Teletext. I think the advantage to
it was most televisions supported Teletext by the 1980s and it was
a free service - albeit you had to pay your annual TV license.
 
  djulius - 12 hours ago
  It was ubiquitous, everybody had a minitel at home since it was
  provided for free by France T?l?com.The white/yellow page service
  (3611) was free for the first three minutes and was widely used.
  My parents never had the (huge) yearly book version at home.As
  mentioned in other comments it was also widely used to consult
  Baccalaur?at (national exam like SAT) results.
 
    bigbugbag - 7 hours ago
    At peak in 2003 there were 9.1 millions minitels for 55
    millions people so not ubiquitous but common.3611 used to offer
    the first 3 minutes free for a few years then removed this.
 
      vbernat - 4 hours ago
      3611 was free until 2007, when it became mostly irrelevant.
      9.1 millions of minitels is about half the population (in
      number of households). I don't think that 2003 was a peak
      since Internet was already there for quite some time (people
      could get broadband at this time).
 
      Renaud - 4 hours ago
      People had a minitel per family, not per person, so nearly 10
      million minitels make for a pretty good penetration rate.
 
  d--b - 12 hours ago
  Everybody had one. You didn't have to buy the terminal, most
  people rented it from the phone company for a few francs a month.
  And the most useful services were free.
 
    bigbugbag - 6 hours ago
    try that again. At first it was given at no cost to people who
    accepted to stop receiving the paper phonebook, then you could
    rent or buy depending on the specific model. During the golden
    age about 20% homes were equipped at peak it reached 25% (far
    from everybody had one).There were no services available for
    free, at first there were two kinds: the service provider pays
    the operator or the user pays the operator (about 3? an hour).
    no money for the service provider. Then came the kiosk offer
    which started the golden age: the user now pays 9? an hour with
    6? for the service and 3 for the operator.
 
      llsf - 3 hours ago
      9 million terminals for a total population of 55 million, it
      is pretty good coverage.  I used to live in Cesson-S?vign?,
      where it was born.  One day, my dad came back home early 80's
      with one for free.After few years everybody I know had one
      per household, except for my grandparents.  Pretty much every
      household who wanted one could get one.Later they built more
      fancy terminals (faster modem, combined with phone, better
      screen/graphics, etc.) and rented them.  The free one was
      still a good deal.The White Pages where totally free.  And if
      I recall the Yellow Pages had a the first minute or so free.
      I remember navigating the pages as fast as possible to not
      pay the fee.As mentioned before some school results and even
      applications were made using the terminal, for residual fee
      on the phone bill.My mom was buying online (3Suisses, Redoute
      and CAMIF) through the terminal from early 80's until early
      2000.  She had a hard time to move to internet website when
      it comes to buy online.  She heard so much of CC fraud online
      that she felt safer using the Minitel.
 
    [deleted]
 
  chinathrow - 12 hours ago
  I was also a heavy user of telext in my earlier years as a news
  junkie - I wouldn't compare it to Minitel or the web though, as
  it was unidirectional only.
 
    mjw1007 - 12 hours ago
    The UK equivalent of Minitel was Prestel, which used the same
    display system as Teletext.
 
digi_owl - 9 hours ago
As an aside, i recall running into something similar to a Minitel,
only it was web based and used ISDN for connectivity.Basically it
was a desk phone with a slide out keyboard and embedded web
browser.
 
  kalleboo - 8 hours ago
  There were a bunch of devices kind of like that around the dot-
  com boom https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3Com_Audrey
 
webreac - 9 hours ago
I remember having used minitel 1B (80 colomns) in 1992 to connect
to my school from home (600km away) to send my updated (using vi)
report (in latex) to my teacher. The main drawback of course was
that the phone line was always busy. It was using a quite cheap
(the equivalent of 0.02? per minutes) connection (36 21).
 
ForHackernews - 14 hours ago
Some previous discussion here:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14577881
 
gumby - 6 hours ago
The article isn't kidding when it said that the old phone system
was terrible,  phones typically had a second earpiece so you could
hear through both ears in the hope of making out what the other
party said.And them in a huge jump foreward, the PTT switched to
digital and by 1980 anybody could get digital service (isdn)
cheaply at their house.