GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-30) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Scott's Cheap Flights: Growing a small side project into a booming
business
401 points by bkidwell
https://www.indiehackers.com/businesses/scotts-cheap-flights-02
___________________________________________________________________
 
jpindar - 3 hours ago
OK, so how many of us are wondering what other kinds of products
this would work for?I've seen similar newsletters for books, for
Amazon Subscribe & Save, and for low cost Amazon items.
 
  moeamaya - 2 hours ago
  Solid ideas but I think they may struggle with lower margins.
  With flights you save X00s but with Amazon X0s. Saw this with all
  the Airbnb for...since hotel replacement is similarly a higher
  margin/value purchase.On that note you may be able to this with
  cars, hotels, real estate, luxury watches, computers, etc
 
  RepressedEmu - 3 hours ago
  what is the one for low cost Amazon items? I've been thinking
  about starting a daily store of weird items but this seems like a
  good idea also.Like sub $20 gift ideas/wacky items
 
SadWebDeveloper - 7 hours ago
Just wondering if the guys can automate the scraping part, seems
unlikely this is usually information that needs to be handpicked or
"moderated" by one or more humans.
 
  [deleted]
 
  danjoc - 2 hours ago
  Who says it's not
  automated?https://workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/93696/is-
  it-un...;)Seriously though, automation may not be a good value
  proposition, even if the companies with the data that SCF is
  scraping manually want to cooperate. It seems the human scrapers
  are a fixed cost. It's not getting harder to do manual scraping
  as new customers come on board. The business is already paying
  this fixed cost. The business is currently doing well. All the
  business really needs to do is continue growing and the fixed
  cost will continue to shrink as a proportion of the business.Why
  would the business care in that situation? Reduce from 12 mid-
  range salaries to 3-4 high salaries? They would do well just to
  break even on salary expense, so why bother? If it ain't broke,
  don't fix it.
 
  gruturo - 7 hours ago
  Speculation: it's possible that the source sites are actively
  hostile to scraping and intentionally mess with the layout
  regularly, or may even have ruled out any kind of automation in
  their ToS - so if you don't want to get sued or blacklisted, you
  can do no kind of (detectable) scraping.
 
    gorkonsine - 5 hours ago
    >so if you don't want to get sued or blacklisted, you can do no
    kind of (detectable) scraping.So why would it be hard to make
    scraping undetectable, anyway, unless you do it particularly
    incompetently?  In theory, it seems pretty easy: use a browser
    string that matches an existing popular browser, and make sure
    to not load anything faster than a human would.
 
      tomarr - 5 hours ago
      Have you done much scraping in the past? There's normally a
      lot more to it when javascript is involved, captcha systems
      etc.This is obviously helped recently by the relatively new
      headless modes for Chrome & Firefox, but before that it was
      using buggy headless implementations or Selenium. These
      weren't well suited to operations at scale.
 
    blevin - 6 hours ago
    Can anyone recommend scraping adapters (businesses or tech)
    that are robust to this sort of thing?  I'm talking about
    something higher level than, say, Beautiful Soup -- something
    you can configure to point at an endpoint, essentially request
    a sql row subscription from it, and not have to mind it too
    much.Both the traversal/retrieval and data-interpretation parts
    seem to have interesting aspects when you consider current
    website design.  Some websites make themselves hard even for
    humans to read  (consider why safari reader mode exists).This
    seems like a potentially valuable service, in the sense of
    being a schlep.  I wonder how many places have home-grown
    scraping efforts as part of their business and how annoying it
    is for them to maintain.
 
    sleepychu - 7 hours ago
    Maybe you're in a better position to negotiate this if you're
    them though?Skyscanner scrape to keep their partner's honest
    (which has always sounded pretty hostile to me but I guess
    they're approaching a pretty user hostile marketplace) and with
    their market share they're able to force their partners to
    comply with reasonable demands.
 
    SadWebDeveloper - 6 hours ago
    That's my main issue with this type of business... can't it be
    automated? probably a huge NO without legal implications
    therefore the "human" expenses are high and if we start to
    think "globally" like the Silicon Valley startups type guys
    always do, the next logical step is to make a mutual benefit
    business partnerships with the Airlines. This will end in a war
    like Airbnb vs Travel Agencies vs Hotel Chains vs Everyone
    else, were the best price in town will be to go directly to the
    source rather than to 3rd parties.
 
    teej - 6 hours ago
    I tried to build a flight search site a few years back and many
    sites have measures in place to actively mitigate scraping. It
    quickly became obvious that I was going to spend more effort
    getting data  than working on the product, so I scrapped the
    idea.Like you said, scraping is against ToS so as soon as you
    get caught, you're cut off until you shell out $$$$ to buy a
    feed. I suspect the reason they've succeeded here is that
    they've stuck with a human-based approach.
 
Huhty - 4 hours ago
What fascinates me with this story is how low tech everything was.
A simple landing page, email list/newsletter, and "value" in the
form of travel deals. Anyone can do it, and the barrier of entry is
minimal.
 
  taphangum - 3 hours ago
  Tech provides leverage horizontally, not vertically.As
  programmers, we often fool ourselves into believing the opposite.
 
Gys - 7 hours ago
Reminds me of: www.holidaypirates.comWith special websites for most
bigger European countries. Its more or less doing the same, with
lots of affiliations, an app, Whatapp group, etc.
 
  thebiglebrewski - 7 hours ago
  Wow these deals look too good to be true! But I guess I'm in the
  US lol
 
  bmsleight_ - 5 hours ago
  Further inspection, looks like terrible prices, the advertised
  rates are based upon such things as 7 people sharing.
 
  [deleted]
 
  thesimon - 5 hours ago
  Or fly4free or secretflying or ..99% of the time it's just
  affiliate links slapped on some deals found on FlyerTalk
 
kitcar - 7 hours ago
Interesting that they have been able to raise prices over time - a
fixed number of cheap seats available at any moment means the more
users on the email list, the less likely an individual user will be
able to extract value from the list - hence list growth actually
reduces the value it delivers.I guess fear of missing out is a
strong sales tool!
 
benjaminbeck - 7 hours ago
Amazing how much they did without too much technology or upstart
cost!
 
jly - 6 hours ago
Awesome writeup.  It's great to see companies that can make this
work without taking any funding.  I had no idea there were so many
people behind this.I have nothing to add except that I've been a
very happy paid customer for several months now.  These guys run a
fantastic service that has been worth every penny.  Yes, some
travel companies that have extensive infrastructure could probably
do what is being done here, but they don't.
 
notadoc - 6 hours ago
Great read. The indiehackers site is full of interesting interviews
and stories, well worth all of them as there is always something to
learn.
 
chriskingnet - 3 hours ago
I'm not a fan of the fact that on their website the testimonials
are the same (with the currency changed) no matter what location I
choose.The destinations in the locations are of course also the
same, so it just kinda seems like they are trying to trick me. Kind
of reinforcing the feeling I generally get from this kind of
business. If they have that many happy users, they could at least
get real testimonials from each place.
 
  blhack - 3 hours ago
  What is happening here?  http://imgur.com/a/1c8NjYou posted this
  identical comment both here, on an account that has only a few
  posts over the last 5 years or so, and on what looks like a
  throwaway.
 
[deleted]
 
Taylor_OD - 5 hours ago
I've been on the list for a little while. I havnt booked any
flights from the deals yet because I've got a fair bit of traveling
planned already this year but I'm starting to look at flights for
next year. Check out the list if you havnt. I live in chicago and
flights anywhere are usually $500 or less.
 
losiiiii - 3 hours ago
I'm not a fan of the fact that on their website the testimonials
are the same (with the currency changed) no matter what location I
choose.The destinations in the locations are of course also the
same, so it just kinda seems like they are trying to trick me. Kind
of reinforcing the feeling I generally get from this kind of
business. If they have that many happy users, they could at least
get real testimonials from each place.
 
triangleman - 6 hours ago
So, Scott originally accumulated all those miles working for
ThinkProgress? How does that work? You buy the flights and expense
them back to the company, pocketing the miles?
 
  mysterypie - 6 hours ago
  Yes, it's completely 100% standard practice as other replies
  already mentioned. What's funny is that the tone of your question
  suggests he's doing something fraudulent. If you were the company
  auditor or a government prosecutor, and you didn't know about the
  standard practice or simply wanted to be a jerk, you could
  absolutely make a case for fraud. If you were fired or prosecuted
  for keeping the miles, what would be your counterargument?
  Everyone else was doing it? That doesn't work for speeding
  tickets. This is an example of how arbitrary laws can be.
 
  sv123 - 6 hours ago
  Yes, that is how it works at most companies AFAIK.
 
    greglindahl - 6 hours ago
    And the IRS is totally OK with it, since 2002:
    https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/a-02-18.pdf
 
    Fezzik - 3 hours ago
    Most companies I have worked for/heard about have the option of
    1) using a company card with the company keeping the perks, 2)
    using your own card and getting reimbursed or, less often, 3)
    using a company card that is in our name, paid by the company,
    with all perks going to you. I've seen 3 most often with
    Diner's Club cards that cover only meals and 2 most often with
    travel, if you opt for it. I have seen a surprising number of
    people who do not want to deal with another bill though, and
    opt for 1, leaving all the perks with the company. I never
    understood that, but I enjoy any perks I can get.
 
  inerte - 6 hours ago
  Yes. This happens in pretty much every company, even if the
  company has a corporate card. Employees rather buy the tickets
  themselves and expense the costs.
 
    exelius - 6 hours ago
    Well, if you have a corporate American Express card, you can
    pay $75/yr and you accumulate all the points on your corporate
    card for yourself.
 
  basseq - 5 hours ago
  Frequent flyer miles (and hotel points) are a massive perk for
  traveling employees. Most consultants I know finance annual
  vacations completely on points. Every once in a while, a big
  company will try to pocket the points for themselves, usually to
  great outcry--because it's akin to cutting benefits.The corporate
  thinking is: "Points are a reward for buying travel. And I'm the
  one footing the bill." The employee thinking is: "Points are a
  reward for traveling. And I'm the one on the damn plane."Personal
  perks on a corporate card are similar, and again, do the math of
  how many points you get by channeling $60-100k/yr worth of
  corporate travel expenses through a credit card.
 
    zild3d - 4 hours ago
    don't most frequent flyer programs require the name on the
    ticket to match the rewards account? E.g. I can't buy my sister
    a flight, she flies it, and I get points for it.
 
    nisse72 - 2 hours ago
    In Sweden, if you accumulate points while travelling on
    business but use them for personal flights, the tax department
    wants you to pay tax on the value of the benefit (likely: how
    much you would have paid without points). How they can know
    about it is another matter.I think at least the larger
    employers will ask that you keep separate work and private
    frequent flyer accounts for that purpose, and use your work
    points only for work flights.Oh how I miss the Swedish tax
    system...
 
jmarbach - 5 hours ago
Disclosure: I built a competing tool for finding cheap flights,
https://concorde.io.I think the secret of Scott's success is his
incredible writing ability. Finding the cheap flights is the easy
part. Communicating with users in a way that consistently wins over
their hearts and minds takes a high level of consideration and
creativity. This writing ability combined with his co-founder's
understanding and application of direct response marketing has
produced fantastic results. I am glad to see their success.
 
  mattfrommars - 4 hours ago
  Love the simplistic design of the website to give the information
  right away! Can you where are you sourcing the data from? I've
  playing with Flask and Scrapy yesterday and love to build
  something like it. What I have in mind, [Complete disclosure -
  I'm a total novice right now] Scrapy to get the data and Flask to
  integrate it on the web with a Boostrap front end.
 
    jmarbach - 3 hours ago
    Thank you! The deals that I post and distribute are sourced
    from a variety of sources including manual searching with tools
    like Google Flights / QPX (like Scott's team), programmatic
    searching (expensive as others have mentioned in the comments
    here), forums or blogs, and of course Concorde's "Discover"
    tool. The Discover tool makes use of a cache of flight search
    data that is collected from Global Distribution Systems (GDS)
    such as Sabre and others. Further reading on GDS's:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_distribution_system
 
  flanbiscuit - 4 hours ago
  I replied to one of his emails and we had a nice back and forth
  even laughing at a pic response I sent him. He seems like a good
  person and I signed up for his premium service. I was already
  very interested in his premium svc but that interaction really
  sealed the deal for me.
 
    jmarbach - 3 hours ago
    Thank you :)
 
  professorTuring - 3 hours ago
  I'm an SCF premium, will you give me a premium 3 Month coupon in
  order to compare the services and maybe switch my subscription to
  your app?
 
    jmarbach - 2 hours ago
    Please try Concorde's First Class membership free for one month
    using the coupon code "firstmonthfree", which is available to
    all users.
 
      professorTuring - 2 hours ago
      Ok, didn't see it! =)
 
      professorTuring - 2 hours ago
      Is it mandatory to fill my CC details in order to subscribe
      with the promotion? (I don't really enjoy doing that...)
 
  Toast_ - 2 hours ago
  Do you use a particular api to find these flights?
 
  adventured - 1 hours ago
  Suggestion for your site. I'd change the front page header text
  that says: "Discover cheap flights with Concorde."It's not the
  text I disagree with it, it's how you're using it. You've made it
  so that you have to mouse over that text to make it react
  (segments change color) and figure out that each section may be
  clickable (how do I know where they go, if I'm an average user
  and don't necessarily know to look at the url hover at the bottom
  of the browser?).Why is it an issue? It's extraordinarily bad
  usability, because there's nothing above the fold on your site
  that says: sign up. Not anywhere. There's a weird text in the
  upper right that says "Discover" that is changing colors, but
  gives no indication that it links to /sign-up. From a logical
  usability stand point, why would the "Discover" text be the
  /sign-up link, as opposed to just having a "Sign up | Login"
  segment.You're trying too hard to be clever / creative, you're
  over-doing it and it's a bad usability outcome.At the top, I'd
  keep the large text that is making a clear statement. Then place
  two or so lines of descriptive text below it, with blatant links
  to signing up etc. Or some variation on this. You have plenty of
  room to work with up in the header area.
 
  sfbay - 4 hours ago
  Nice website.  Fix this issue: 1) When I search with a date, it
  loses the depart and return dates every time. Save the dates and
  remember them. 2) After I select a depart date calender as Month
  September, it should open September when I select Return
  calendar.
 
    jmarbach - 4 hours ago
    Thank you for the feedback! Agreed that the depart and return
    date inputs should be improved as you mention. I am always
    seeking to eliminate needless repetitive actions! I'll do my
    best to get this resolved quickly.
 
  jontas - 4 hours ago
  Tiny suggestion:  I was looking at flights and it was not
  immediately clear to me that Santa Cruz referred to Bolivia and
  not California.  It almost made me disregard it and not click.
  May want to put the country name on the homepage as well.
 
    gleglegle - 3 hours ago
    Santa Cruz, Bolivia (pop. 1,640,615) is much larger than Santa
    Cruz, CA (pop. 64,465).
 
      Simon_says - 1 hours ago
      The number of people in Santa Cruz, Bolivia who have set foot
      on an airplane is probably comparably to the number in Santa
      Cruz, CA.
 
      tomjakubowski - 3 hours ago
      While true (also, all the other flights on the list right now
      are US<->Not US), in GP's defense the context may not have
      been clear.If a fellow Angeleno asks me what I did over the
      weekend, I could say "I went to Venice" and my meaning
      (Venice, the neighborhood in LA) would be clear. Not
      necessarily so to someone from Chicago, or even from
      elsewhere in California.Having said that, a flag icon next to
      the city name to represent the city's country would be cute
      but also informational.
 
        jmarbach - 2 hours ago
        I like the idea of making use of the city's country flag.
        In terms of a design element, that would compliment the
        airline tail icons which I think are important to see from
        my perspective as a traveler. Thank you!
 
  dabernathy89 - 4 hours ago
  FYI: I am trying to update my user settings (for my airport
  preferences) but it won't let me without re-entering my CC
  information.
 
    jmarbach - 3 hours ago
    Thank you for mentioning this. I'm sorry for the unnecessary
    repetitive credit card input. My plan is to separate the
    editing of payment and location preference to their own pages
    in the future.
 
thebiglebrewski - 7 hours ago
This is amazing but is it the kind of business that can last for
more than a few hundred thousand users? At a certain point people
get none of the free deals, because too many are trying to book at
once, right?
 
  bkidwell - 7 hours ago
  That's a great question. At a certain point... yes. But I think
  that number is much higher than a few hundred thousand users. If
  you think about departure cities X destination cities X available
  dates and times X number of seats, the number is huge. I'm not
  saying it won't happen, but I think we have a long ways to go
  before we reach that level.
 
  juskrey - 7 hours ago
  While flight industry is booming, almost nothing matters - just
  keep telling people they can fly cheap. Dozens of aggregators are
  already doing this.
 
  austenallred - 7 hours ago
  Even if it caps out right where it is... they're retired after
  not too long
 
    DerfNet - 7 hours ago
    Yeah, if they're pulling $5/mo from each premium subscriber,
    that's... well, some pretty easy math. They could put a cap on
    the userbase if they wanted and still be pulling millions per
    month just off subscriptions, not even accounting for ad
    revenue.
 
      [deleted]
 
      Toast_ - 2 hours ago
      Pretty crazy that they're pulling that much revenue without
      even using affiliate links.
 
  beejiu - 7 hours ago
  On the other hand, does it matter how long the business lasts? It
  seemingly has minimal costs and is making bank.
 
[deleted]
 
joering2 - 5 hours ago
If you receive Scott's emails for longer than one week, you will
quickly have the answer to your question "why not to scrap".I think
enough people turn to premium member exactly because a personal
touch of Scott and his team. You have this feeling this is not
simple aggregate -- I always enjoy reading Scott little tips "when
you buy ticket to certain city, don't forget to visit specific
point of interest". I end up researching those and always came up
with fun info, making me believe Scott is pro and knows what he is
doing/researching for me. A scrapper will be inhumane and you will
quickly realize that and most likely convert 1% of what they
convert.Scott - I am very curious how did you initially advertise
your newsletter? First weeks/months you were live - how did you get
your initial traffic?Thanks!
 
lavezzi - 5 hours ago
Still don't see the appeal. I get better and quicker results from
theflightdeal.com and flyertalk.
 
  mherdeg - 4 hours ago
  As far as I can tell Theflightdeal is basically the same service
  -- a small army of people searches for fares (HOPEFULLY WITH SOME
  AUTOMATION!), checks whether there are any results whose price is
  very low relative to historical prices they have logged for that
  route, and publishes a blog post if the price is very low. They
  have little blurbs about each destination prewritten so it's very
  easy to make the blog post once they see a good fare. ("Good
  deal" is computed either on a cents-per-mile basis or on a low-
  price-per-segment basis for certain special routes.) Often a
  human reads through the fare rules (I'm guessing they just use
  expertflyer, heh) and adds a bit of extra color like booking
  class, advance purchase restrictions, purchase-by date, etc. to
  help save people some time. That blog gets money from affiliate
  revenue (click thru from their blog post and book travel and they
  often earn a percentage). Very clever, tremendously successful in
  the niche.Looker pivoted into doing something similar but with a
  mobile app (after first trying to do REALLY hard big-data work I
  think). They seem to perform the same kind of analysis, but with
  more automation and less reliance on spreadsheet. They use a
  really interesting input stream (real-time search query results
  from a GDS -- so, actual booked flights) to alert people when a
  route they care about is cheap vs typical prices.Other services
  exist which do the same thing but for premium-cabin travel; these
  services tend not to be public facing and try to charge
  ridiculous prices in part because J/F travel carries a certain
  cachet and also in part because those deals tend to be
  considerably more fragile.There are afaict somewhere like 10-100
  of these "deal newsletter" business models doing basically the
  same work as the deal blogs but trying to make money on
  subscriptions. Very clever, I definitely respect the hustle.
 
joelrunyon - 7 hours ago
Good to see Brian & Scott on here. Crazy explosive growth over the
past 18-24 months!Great evolution of an MVP into a legitimate, mid-
size business without taking tons of funding to do it.
 
  bkidwell - 7 hours ago
  Thanks Joel!
 
knownothing - 4 hours ago
So now people are paying other people to browse FlyerTalk for them?
At least if you're part of the forum you can contribute back to the
community.
 
desireco42 - 5 hours ago
Definitely great business and great example of side business.
 
tmaly - 5 hours ago
I just listened to the podcast for Scott's Cheap Flights.Fantastic
job Courtland.  Your podcast is one of my favorites in this space.
 
  hboon - 4 hours ago
  Can you recommend other similar podcasts?
 
jpster - 7 hours ago
>We actually don't do a ton of A/B testing or worry much about open
and click rates, and here's why: Our revenue model is subscription
based. We don't take any commissions or have any ads in the premium
emails. Our only incentive is to keep premium subscribers happy.I
find this a surprising statement -- aren't the emails the primary
channel for trying to convince a free user to upgrade to paid? Why
not try A/B testing to try and boost that percentage from the ~10%
to something higher?
 
  rangersanger - 6 hours ago
  He did say they "don't do a ton," so they are definitely doing
  some, maybe that's where?That said, I do appreciate the sentiment
  here. This is a different context entirely, but in my ecomm past
  a/b testing was often employed by those seeking the politically
  safest growth path. I considered it proactive CYA where Product
  Managers would prefer premature optimization over having an
  opinion on what's best for the user.I witnessed what I considered
  an unhealthy amount of a/b testing resources spent on micro
  adjustments eg moving a buy button a few pixels or changing the
  color slightly. There was very little calculated risk taking,
  which can be enabled with A/B testing employed differently.
  There's absolutely a place for those kinds of optimizations but I
  think they come much later in product maturity than when many
  organizations actually begin using them.Then there's an entire
  other discussion about understanding the math behind building a
  relevant test and interpreting the results.
 
    bkidwell - 6 hours ago
    You're right. We do some A/B testing when we're running
    promotions (test headlines, CTAs, etc.) but that's about it.
    There is a lot that goes into correctly running split tests on
    the website and interpreting those results. We decided that
    once something is working good enough we'd focus on other areas
    of the business. However, now that the team is larger and we
    have resources to dedicate to testing and optimizing we will
    likely start doing this by the end of the year.Like you said,
    moving buttons and changing colors is really just a waste of
    time. You have to spend the time to do the analytics research,
    get customer feedback, etc. to first understand the problem so
    you can come up with a solution. Changing the color of a button
    doesn't solve a problem. Rather than wasting resources on doing
    conversion optimization the wrong way, we've decided to hold
    off until we can do it the right way.
 
  napworth - 7 hours ago
  In most cases, A/B testing will actually do negative damage than
  if you didn't test it at all.
 
    jpster - 6 hours ago
    Depends on if the tester actually knows what they're doing.
    https://blog.kissmetrics.com/your-ab-tests-are-illusory/
 
      ssharp - 6 hours ago
      In most cases, flying a plane yourself will result in more
      negative damage than having a trained pilot fly you.
 
    ssharp - 6 hours ago
    Interested in further thought here.
 
    jdpedrie - 6 hours ago
    [citation needed]
 
    eddigo - 6 hours ago
    And I would bet in a large subset of those cases it's because
    the person implementing those tests and the person interpreting
    the results aren't the same.  And that neither understands
    basic statistical hypothesis testing.
 
kingosticks - 5 hours ago
I recently subscribed to the UK version of this
(https://www.jacksflightclub.co.uk). I didn't know there was  a US
version, I guess there might be lots of similar services. I wonder
who came first.
 
  bkidwell - 5 hours ago
  We have plenty of copycats out there (one of the downsides of us
  trying to share our learnings online haha). I'd just look at when
  the domains were purchased if you want to know who was first ;)
  Also, we send deals from almost every continent (launching Africa
  by the end of the year).
 
    Naritai - 4 hours ago
    Still looking forward to you having dedicated emails for
    international business class tickets.  I know the tickets won't
    be cheap that the total cash savings on cheap seats can be
    significant.  Here's hoping!
 
bhyam - 7 hours ago
Really cool story.
 
jwong_ - 4 hours ago
One thing I'd like to vent about is that Scott seems to be making a
lot of money selling e-mail addresses.I signed up for a couple
different contests using unique e-mail addresses generated
specifically for the contest (Yes, they were separate e-mails for
separate contests; No, I did not double-dip my entrees). I was then
signed up for 2-3 e-mail lists for 3rd party companies over the
course of a couple weeks. These companies weren't even doing
anything tangentially related to what Scott writes about(cheap
flights). I wish it was more transparent that he was going to sign
you up for these random companies.
 
  joelrunyon - 3 hours ago
  This isn't really "selling" email addresses. It seems much more
  like it's a lead gen strategy that multiple companies are
  participating.Providing an incentive to sign up isn't quite the
  same as sending all those subscribers to the giveaway that didn't
  opt-in to it?
 
    ghostly_s - 2 hours ago
    As a consumer, the relevant word in that sentence is not
    "sell". The point is my email is being given to someone else,
    to do whatever they feel with it. Why would I care what in what
    form the original business is compensated?
 
      joelrunyon - 2 hours ago
      Well in that case, by signing up for the giveaway, you're
      consenting to "giving" your email address to ALL of those
      companies that are sponsoring it.So in that case, you should
      have a nice little talk with yourself about whether the trip
      you want to win is worth 5 new services having your email
      address.Either way, the person making that call is YOU, not
      SCF (or any of the other companies participating).
 
        izacus - 40 minutes ago
        Can you show me exact notification on the website where he
        consented to sharing the email address?And you REALLY
        believe that using a search on a site suddenly is enough
        for your private data to be just given to any shady
        exploitative company on the planet? You really want to live
        in a world where you're badgered constantly and without
        pause by ads, scammers and phishers just because you want
        to use the internet?
 
          joelrunyon - 29 minutes ago
          Yes,Here's a version that's hosted on ProductHunt - https
          ://giveaway.producthunt.com/landing?promo_id=83848bb5-f..
          .Specifically, you might be interested in this text right
          before the big "enter" button:> By entering this campaign
          I agree and consent to recieve emails, communications and
          promotions from Product Hunt Inc., theSkimm (a daily
          email newsletter to stay in the know), Scott's Cheap
          Flights, Journy, The Wirecutter and Conde Nast
          Traveler.You can hate the promotion, but you're certainly
          not required to join it. And, it's certainly not the same
          thing as Scott selling addresses of people already on his
          mailing list.As for this:> And you REALLY believe that
          using a search on a site suddenly is enough for your
          private data to be just given to any shady exploitative
          company on the planet?Using your words, can you show me
          the exact phrasing where that is happening anywhere in
          this example?
 
  sanj - 4 hours ago
  Another data point: I haven't seen any email indicating that
  Scott's selling the addresses.
 
    jwong_ - 4 hours ago
    Have you signed up for any of the contests? I think it
    specifically targets people who entered contests.
 
      joelrunyon - 2 hours ago
      Signing up for a contest that SCF promoted is completely
      different than signing up for the SCF service itself.Big
      difference. I suspect you know it too.
 
  bkidwell - 4 hours ago
  Hey, I'm just going to post the same response I used in the
  IndieHackers comment section for someone with a similar concern.
  Here's what I said:"Our subscribers are too important to us to
  ever sell their information to someone else. We never have and
  never will sell users information like that. Our only source of
  income is subscriptions and occasional advertisements in the free
  emails. Ruining our reputation to make a few extra bucks would be
  an extremely stupid decision on our end. With that said, we do
  run promotions with partners where we give away awesome vacation
  packages (Mexico and Tokyo recently). If anyone signs up for one
  of these promotions they are agreeing to the terms and
  conditions, which clearly state that by signing up for the
  giveaway the email address will be distributed to all of the
  partners involved in the giveaway (typically 4-5 other
  companies)."And their response:"Thanks for the reply! I looked
  through my emails and found that the emails started right after I
  entered a giveaway from you. So that explains it! You're right,
  it does say for the giveaway offer that you're signing up for
  emails. Sorry that I jumped to conclusions. It's just that I get
  a lot of spam and it's very annoying. Also, your partner emails
  provided no value to me at all."--With that said, it looks like
  we could do a better job making it even more explicit (which we
  try to do in the emails announcing the giveaway). We'll work on
  this on our end and never intended to mislead anyone.
 
    jwong_ - 4 hours ago
    I don't know if you've looked at what gets sent out, but the
    e-mails sent for the Giveaways are extremely spammy.I get that
    you probably added it somewhere in the giveaway text, but from
    a post somewhere, it was indicated the giveaways were more to
    garner attention, not as a profit-making venture. It turned me
    off completely when I started getting those. It gave me a
    negative impression on both Scott's Cheap Flights and on any
    companies that started sending me cold emails.Maybe you can be
    more selective in your partners, or perhaps work with the
    partners in what gets sent out. I'm very judicious in what I
    let get my attention, and seeing these kinds of random sales
    pitches with no actual value proposition was annoying.I went
    back to the giveaway and found the e-mail consent in the tiny
    text under the consent checkmark for signing up, so I can give
    you that for having the warning there now. It was not noticed
    when I signed up, however.
 
      bkidwell - 4 hours ago
      Yeah I hear you. I really appreciate the feedback as well.We
      only try to partner with high quality companies. For example
      this Tokyo one were running right now is with journy,
      ProductHunt, theSkimm, The Wirecutter, and Conde Nast
      Traveler. All legitimate companies. It's unfortunate that
      their emails are seen as spam because that's not good for
      anyone.We'll keep this in mind moving forward. Thank you
      again :-)
 
        SSilver2k2 - 4 hours ago
        I have gotten messages from all of these, and they are
        complete spam.  I'm glad I know it's your fault.What's done
        is done, I've unsubscribed.
 
          mdns33 - 2 hours ago
          Oops. One customer lost. Nice way to market your company.
 
        robocat - 1 hours ago
        Perhaps make your user enter their email again... To make
        it clear they are subscribing and giving their email out?
 
        [deleted]
 
        ghostly_s - 2 hours ago
        Again, sticking opposing thoughts into two consecutive
        sentences does not create a good impression of your
        business. "high quality companies" !== "legitimate
        companies".
 
    ChuckMcM - 3 hours ago
    And these two comments (the parent and grandparent) capture the
    tension between money and principles. I don't know anything
    about the insides of your business but we dealt with this crap
    all the time at Blekko.Realistically, how many of your
    customers are going to make a custom email for your giveaway
    promotions? Its going to be small, and they are 100% going to
    get spammed and abused by that part of the Internet industry
    that slams unwanted apps in your face or hijacks your search
    page for sideloads an advertising rootkit on to your phone.
    Because that is what they do, they get away with it and make a
    lot of money at it, and yes they offer you a small piece of the
    action and all you have to do is give them validated email
    addresses.The local Taqueria had a jar that said "Put in your
    business card for a chance for free lunch, awarded monthly!"
    and the jar had dozens of business cards in it. I asked about
    it and the restaurant had nothing to do with it, except that
    the restaurant was paid by a local recruiter $100 a month to
    have that jar there.So one of the Internet scumbags makes a
    deal with a web site, "Here is a contest you could run which is
    tangentially related to your web content, all you have to do is
    run the contest and we'll pay you $x." Free money right? No, it
    just makes you one of the Internet scumbags too, maybe you
    didn't know they were going to click jack Grandma's PC but at
    some level everyone who gets into these deals know there must
    be some catch otherwise they wouldn't be giving you all this
    money right?If you are in the airport and someone says "Oh, are
    you on the flight to Chicago? My sister-in-law just left for
    there and forgot this bag, if you'll check it through to
    Chicago when you get there she will pay you for your trouble.
    How about $500 ?"You have to ask; Why is it worth $500 for me
    to pretend this is my luggage when it would cost less than half
    that to go to FedEx and just ship it? Why is this person paying
    me to run a free lunch contest for them? Why is this internet
    company paying me to run a giveaway contest for them?At Blekko
    we tried several times to find the people who weren't scumbags
    and were actually trying to provide a real service or value to
    our customers. They may be out there but if they are, they are
    outnumbered by scumbags at least 1000:1, maybe more.The only
    winning strategy was to just not deal with them at all.
 
    breakingcups - 4 hours ago
    What an incredible response, have you not read it yourself?"Our
    subscribers are too important to us to ever sell their
    information to someone else. We never have and never will sell
    users information like that. Our only source of income is
    subscriptions and occasional advertisements in the free emails.
    Ruining our reputation to make a few extra bucks would be an
    extremely stupid decision on our end."Is at complete odds
    with:"With that said, we do run promotions with partners where
    we give away awesome vacation packages (Mexico and Tokyo
    recently). If anyone signs up for one of these promotions they
    are agreeing to the terms and conditions, which clearly state
    that by signing up for the giveaway the email address will be
    distributed to all of the partners involved in the giveaway
    (typically 4-5 other companies)."You literally sell their
    information to advertisers (oh no, sorry, your "partners") to
    make a buck. Acknowledge it, don't preface it with PR bull.
    What do you see as the difference between the first and the
    second paragraph? The fact that you only do it with people
    entering your promotions? Because that's still your users
    information.Yes it's in your TOS, you are still selling
    personal information to third parties and their unknown
    partners.
 
      stavrus - 2 hours ago
      I'm not seeing how the two paragraphs are incongruous. The
      company is selling their brand, not the user info, when they
      run the promotions. If no-one signs up for the promotion, no
      user info gets shared. Ultimately it's the users who choose
      whether they want to sell themselves as a marketing lead in
      return for a slim chance at winning.
 
      [deleted]
 
      jwong_ - 4 hours ago
      Thanks for putting my feelings into words.And their partners
      are extremely spammy at best. They're all trying to force
      engagement and word of mouth.Here's an excerpt from one of
      the intro e-mails I got:  > Welcome to the #SkimmLife! Here's
      how it's going to work:   > We'll meet you back here, in your
      inbox, bright and early tomorrow morning (PS If it's Friday
      or a weekend,    > you'll get theSkimm on Monday). We're a
      company that respects brunch, so we won't be with you on
      Saturday and   > Sunday. Can't wait? Here's the most recent
      Skimm   > Also, download our new app theSkimm for iPhone. It
      has a service called Skimm Ahead that makes it easier to    >
      be smarter about the future. Never again will you miss
      moments like when you vote in a primary or when your    >
      favorite show is back on Netflix. Best Part? It can integrate
      directly into your calendar.   > Lastly, good things happen
      when you share theSkimm! (read: winning prizes, swag, being a
      Skimm'bassador).    > To get credit for sharing, use your
      unique link: http://www.theskimm.com/?r=3cbcb2df OR our fancy
      invite page   > to have friends sign up. See how many people
      listen to you by checking this page.   > Your morning just
      got better. Trust us.  edit: formatting
 
        clay_to_n - 2 hours ago
        FWIW theSkimm isn't outright spam - they're a fairly
        popular super-short newsletter that I think does a mix of
        world news and lifestyle / culture stuff, apparently
        marketed at women. I subscribe to Finimize (financial news)
        and Casual Spectator (sports), and theSkimm is often
        referenced as a similar newsletter.Not to diminish the
        annoyance of being on surprise email lists. I agree it's
        frustrating, and it sounds like Scott's Cheap Flights
        should have been more clear with their users about the
        price of their contests.
 
        munchman - 3 hours ago
        barf
 
        exclusiv - 2 hours ago
        Yeah further down they note: "We only try to partner with
        high quality companies. For example this Tokyo one were
        running right now is with journy, ProductHunt, theSkimm,
        The Wirecutter, and Conde Nast Traveler"I looked at
        theSkimm and can't figure out how it's related either. Just
        seems like an email acquisition bartering scheme.
 
      joelrunyon - 2 hours ago
      The difference is that they're not selling people that sign
      up with them directly on SCF.They're using a promotional
      strategy to solicit signups in exchange for a giveaway
      (people have been doing this for years). They partner with
      several sites to promote this so everyone grows. Users are
      explicitly signing up for the giveaway & those TOS state the
      email will be distributed to the partners.They are not
      selling their current users information to partners.In other
      words, you might not like the promotion strategy, but that's
      a one-off, easy-to-change thing. They are not selling email
      addresses that they got directly via scottscheapflights.com -
      which is what the GP was insinuating (a bit dishonestly
      too).There's a big difference as what's actually happening
      can be a strategy that you dislike (and they might as well,
      depending on the outcome), but what the GP is insinuating is
      that SCF is actually SELLING the data, is completely
      incorrectly.
 
      [deleted]
 
    stillhere - 2 hours ago
    "ever have and never will"Except you do.
 
      joemi - 55 minutes ago
      You're confusing the email subscription terms with the
      giveaways terms. "ever have an never will" refers to the
      email subscription. You have to specifically sign up
      separately for giveaways, and they have different terms and
      conditions from the email subscription.
 
chrisballinger - 5 hours ago
Something I've noticed that's lacking from most aggregators like
Kayak and SkyScanner (my current fave), is the ability to increase
the price of the ultra-budget carriers by adding their carry-on
baggage fees and whatnot. I don't care about checked bag fees, but
some of the carry-on fees are ridiculous ($60 per overhead item?).
These budget carriers are cheating the system by looking like the
cheapest option, when in reality one of the more expensive carriers
is actually cheaper once you compare them apples-to-apples.
 
  jessriedel - 4 hours ago
  I have written to Kayak suggesting this in the past. Without such
  a feature, the hidden charges and nickle-and-diming will just get
  worse.The best explanation I heard (from elsewhere) was that if
  Kayak automatically included any fees, then some users might see
  a lower price on another site and mistakenly conclude the Kayak
  didn't actually have the lowest prices. But this seems obviously
  solvable by making it a non-default option and displaying the
  price as "$X ($Y fare + $Z fees)".
 
    oh_sigh - 2 hours ago
    They could provide a search option to let you plug in what kind
    of baggage you wanted. So you could say 1 overhead, 2 checked
    bags, and then it could add in the cost (or show it broken out
    next to total cost)
 
  downandout - 3 hours ago
  Add-on fees have gotten out of control, both in the hotel and
  airline space.  There is a race to the bottom for having the
  lowest price to show on booking sites.  This is a form of SEO for
  airlines and hotels.I am not familiar with any airlines that
  charge for carry-ons, but for example I know that many hotels in
  downtown Las Vegas have mandatory "resort fees" that  on many
  nights actually exceed the nightly rate shown in booking engine
  search results - so the actual cost of staying is more than
  double the advertised rate.  Most booking sites have heard so
  many complaints about this that they do show the total (including
  resort fees) just prior to booking.  But the "headline rate" -
  the one shown in search results and used by the sites in
  arranging results by price - is the one sans resort fees.Taken to
  an extreme level, hotels could advertise a $1 nightly rate and a
  $200/nt "resort fee".  It wouldn't surprise me if this actually
  started happening, given the competition among hotels to show up
  first in search results.  It sounds like some budget airlines are
  headed in a similar direction.
 
    blang - 2 hours ago
    Frontier airlines charges for carry-ons IIRC
 
    s0rce - 29 minutes ago
    This is just like used books and various items on ebay coming
    up for 1cent with $15 shipping charges.
 
    dmalvarado - 2 hours ago
    Resort fees drive me crazy.It's one thing to charge for add-ons
    if you're taking a flight, because they're technically optional
    and there is a way to avoid them.But resort fees are mandatory.
    There's no way to opt of using the gym or the pool or whatever
    it is that they're charging for. That they are somehow not
    included in the list price defies logic.
 
      dreamrider - 53 minutes ago
      And the worst of this is in Vegas. You wouldn't use any of
      their amenities and there they are collecting resort fee from
      you and then you end up spending another shit load of money
      gambling.
 
    buckhx - 2 hours ago
    United charges for carry ons. I had to book a flight day of for
    a family emergency and it was super inconvenient. I couldn't
    even find a fare class on United with carry ons that wasn't
    outrageous. You also can't check in ahead of time because they
    inspect you to make sure you aren't sneaking any carry ons.
 
      zjaffee - 1 hours ago
      As of when? I've taken a ton of flights on united and never
      had to pay a carry-on fee. I've seen such fees on airlines
      like spirit or fronteer, but never on a "non-discount"
      airline.
 
        [deleted]
 
        OkGoDoIt - 1 hours ago
        United is piloting a new program called "Basic Economy" for
        flights to Chicago and probably other cities,  which
        effectively turns them into Spirit or Frontier Airlines.
        It's incredibly crappy.  My guess is within a couple years
        all airlines will be doing this.https://www.united.com/web
        /en-US/content/travel/inflight/bas...
 
          toomuchtodo - 1 hours ago
          Hopefully Southwest never goes this route. They are my
          favorite carrier.
 
          njarboe - 27 minutes ago
          I like them a lot also. Full credit on cancellations up
          to 10 minutes before take-off, two bags checked free, and
          no hubs (point to point, non-stop is the way to fly). At
          least they are unlikely to be bought by another airline
          at his point. With a market cap of $37.6 billion, they
          are the second biggest airline world wide and just under
          Delta's $39.4 billion.
 
          kobeya - 1 hours ago
          Southwest never will. It is against their values and how
          they differentiate themselves.
 
          yellow_postit - 1 hours ago
          Most fliers want the lowest price, full stop. They'll
          complain about it to no end but will still keep voting
          for it with their wallets.Must be an interesting
          challenge separating out real user issues from the volume
          of complaints about the service people were advertised
          and agreed to up front.
 
          dragonwriter - 1 hours ago
          > Most fliers want the lowest price, full stopIs it that
          most fliers want that, or is that headline ticket price
          is the easiest thing to compare with existing tools, and
          what people can compare easily shapes their selection
          criteria?
 
          izacus - 43 minutes ago
          How do you "vote with your wallet" when your flight to
          see your family (or destination) is operated by a single
          airline and you have no choice?Do you ever use brain when
          you repeat this religious mantra?
 
      willstrafach - 1 hours ago
      This does not sound correct at all. A personal item and carry
      on are always free on legacy carriers like United. Are you
      sure this was not checked baggage?
 
        OkGoDoIt - 1 hours ago
        I wish that were true, but things are changing. United is
        trying to compete with budget airlines by introducing a new
        fare class called economy basic. https://www.united.com/web
        /en-US/content/travel/inflight/bas...
 
        frenchie14 - 1 hours ago
        Read very carefully:https://www.united.com/CMS/en-
        US/travel/Pages/BaggageCarry-O...
 
          dragonwriter - 1 hours ago
          Technically, they aren't charging for carry-ons, just
          disallowing them (for Econ Basic) and leaving checking
          (and paying the checked-bag fee) as the only option.
 
    joelrunyon - 2 hours ago
    Spirit airlines. Also many airlines are rolling out "basic
    economy fares" that don't include food/drink/carry-on and
    compete with low-cost carriers, but run on normal flights. What
    used to be "normal economy" now requires an "upgrade" or "add-
    on" - ugh.
 
      ghostly_s - 1 hours ago
      Flew United recently and just after boarding they made an
      announcement asking if anyone had purchased one of these
      "basic economy" fares, presumably so they could exclude them
      from the twelve cents worth of pretzel+soda service. What a
      ridiculous and insulting system (not to mention poorly-
      managed!).
 
        joelrunyon - 1 hours ago
        Yup -At least if you're going to discriminate against
        people sitting next to each other, go off the manifest &
        don't be so overt about it.
 
        s0rce - 28 minutes ago
        Another ridiculous thing about United Basic economy that
        doesn't seem like it would save them money is that you
        can't check in online early you have to do it at the
        airport...
 
          jacquesm - 11 minutes ago
          That's in case they overbook you're end of the queue.
 
        xadhominemx - 1 hours ago
        I don't see how you can find it insulting. You pay less
        because you receive a lower level of service and that
        includes the pretzels.
 
          Thrymr - 1 hours ago
          You really don't see how being called out on the
          loudspeaker could be insulting even if the ticket buyer
          was fully aware of the service difference (which they may
          not be)?
 
          xadhominemx - 42 minutes ago
          Is it insulting when you have to sit in the normal seat
          pitch economy seat when the row in front of you paid more
          and received more knee space?
 
        downandout - 53 minutes ago
        The funny thing is that not everyone may even know that
        they are on a "basic economy" fare and may not raise their
        hand - not out of a desire to cheat the system, but because
        somebody else booked their travel (corporate travel
        department, family member, etc.).  That, in addition to the
        people that just don't want to be called out as cheap, will
        yield very few people voluntarily disclosing this on a
        crowded plane.
 
  OkGoDoIt - 1 hours ago
  I 100% percent agree with you.But on a practical note, some
  advice for those traveling on these budget airlines: if you pack
  your carry-on in a backpack rather than a suitcase, every budget
  airline in Europe and the US that I have flown on will not give
  you a hard time about it.  I personally use a very large backpack
  that holds at least as much as a carry-on suitcase, yet the fact
  that it is in backpack form means they count it as my personal
  item and don't give me a hard time.  When I travel I usually have
  a smaller laptop bag inside a compartment in my backpack, once I
  get on the airplane I take that out and keep it with me as a
  personal item (so I can easily access it inflight) and I put my
  backpack overhead like I would a suitcase.  I have successfully
  done this on Frontier, Allegiant, Spirit, and Ryan Air within the
  last year and have not had any issues.
 
    s0rce - 31 minutes ago
    This is also the best plan if you want to use the Basic Economy
    level on United and possibly other carriers. They will charge
    you for a conventional roll-a-board carry on suitcase.
 
    dragonwriter - 21 minutes ago
    >  I personally use a very large backpack that holds at least
    as much as a carry-on suitcase, yet the fact that it is in
    backpack form means they count it as my personal item and don't
    give me a hard time.Interesting; they always officially state
    that the ?personal item? must fit under the seat in front of
    you, which clearly a large backpack won't. No airline's ever
    enforced it that I've noticed, but then I've never flown Basic
    Economy (and haven't flown since it was a thing.)I wouldn't
    rely heavily, though, on that laxity not changing without
    notice.
 
    FTA - 19 minutes ago
    Do they even check if you've paid for a full carry-on as
    opposed to a personal bag? I've flown Frontier a few times
    worried about the size of my backpack, and I never saw anything
    on the computer when I scanned my boarding pass to indicate any
    of that information. I'm fairly certain the gate agent didn't
    even look at my baggage.
 
    [deleted]
 
  throwahey - 4 hours ago
  Hate to piggyback but I noticed that whenever this service gets
  posted on Reddit there are dozens of accounts that reply
  addressing Scott by name and have little to say.Upon checking
  their comment history, I saw that most users hadn't posted
  anything for months, or even ever. It was clear that there was
  some kind of voting manipulation going on, and as reddit goes, if
  something gains traction it's bound to get upvoted just
  because.It's a bit like Candy Japan, who posts here once a month
  with very little to say, and nothing vaguely technical in his
  articles. These kinds of posts just seem like blatant
  advertising. What are the rules for self-promotion of services on
  HN? It just seems dirty when there is a half-hearted article
  advertising a service without being labeled as an ad.Throwaway of
  course, because I'd rather not get attacked by some bots.
 
    cbhl - 4 hours ago
    I used Candy Japan for a bit, and I still rather like the
    articles that they post. I stopped subscribing because I didn't
    actually eat the candy; now I buy Bento boxes at my local
    Japanese grocery store, and I have a "Prime Surprise Sweets"
    Dash Button in my house. But I'd never have been open to the
    idea of subscription boxes (like the Pusheen Box) if it wasn't
    for their articles.Native advertising (where the content is an
    ad) is increasingly common; just look on YouTube, Instagram,
    Buzzfeed, or the average newspaper. Done well, it's win-win --
    the customer learns about or feels good about a brand or
    business; the business gets better brand recall or a new
    customer or whatever. But the root cause is that people are
    having trouble making money online (banner ads, pre-roll ads,
    and text ads don't pay what they used to).
 
    arjunrc - 4 hours ago
    Can you post some of these reddit links?I'd imagine several
    small businesses these days would opt for the "vote
    manipulation" marketing since its easy. (The Silicon Valley TV
    show had a similar plot point).
 
    jakobegger - 1 hours ago
    If you hate to piggyback then don?t do it.
 
  jakub_g - 4 hours ago
  Out of curiosity, which airlines charge $60 for cabin bag?The
  most passenger-squeezing-until-recently airline in Europe
  (Ryanair) now allows two cabin bags for free (one standard ~55cm
  bag and one small bag).Apparently Wizzair charges 10-20? for
  "large" (aka regular) cabin bag though, only small ~42 cm bag is
  allowed for free.
 
    somecontext - 1 hours ago
    For a carry-on in addition to one personal item:Allegiant
    charges $15--50 depending on when you pay.
    https://www.allegiantair.com/popup/optional-services-
    fees#ba...Frontier charges $30--60 depending on when you pay.
    https://www.flyfrontier.com/travel-
    information/baggage/#infoSpirit apparently charges $35--100
    (according to many news and other sites online), though maybe
    the last price is "on the airplane" only?
 
    jjallen - 3 hours ago
    Wow does too.  They actually make sure it's not too big
    sometimes as well.  That said Wow can be 4-5x cheaper
    otherwise, so an extra ~$50 bucks for a carry on is still worth
    it.  No entertainment and wifi but you'll sure get there
    cheaply!
 
    _delirium - 4 hours ago
    If you're comparing round-trip ticket prices, you should double
    the carry-on fee for comparison purposes, since the airlines
    that charge fees for carry-ons typically charge it on both
    outgoing and return legs.Spirit is an American low-cost carrier
    with fees in that range. It's $56 roundtrip for a carry-on bag
    if paid for at booking time, $76 if paid online after booking,
    or $114 if paid at the airport in person.
 
    [deleted]
 
csallen - 6 hours ago
Scott also came onto the Indie Hackers podcast this week to talk a
little more about his business. For example, about why they don't
do any paid advertising to acquire customers:
https://www.indiehackers.com/podcast/020-scott-keyes-of-scot...
 
pgodzin - 6 hours ago
It's interesting that they employ a dozen flight searchers who
manually look all day. Are there any flight prices APIs that can be
scraped, looking for significant outliers?
 
  pgodzin - 6 hours ago
  Just saw thus addressed in the comments:> Great question. We get
  this one a lot and have been approached by quite a few developers
  who say they could easily build us something like this.Is it
  possible? Sure.Would it be better? I doubt it.Say we use Google's
  flight API. The cost per query is 3.5 cents. Departure airports X
  destination airports X available dates X 3.5 cents = a ridiculous
  amount of money.Or we build a scraper. It would be cheaper than
  the API, but we'd still need the human element to make sure it's
  actually a good deal. We take into account number of stops,
  airlines, etc.I see potential for a computer/human combo in the
  future, but right now our flight searchers are doing great and we
  don't feel that automating the process would make the business
  significantly better.
 
natch - 6 hours ago
Ouch, their site triggers one of my pet peeves about travel sites,
listing prices without clarity whether the deal is one-way or round
trip.    NYC to Paris: $260     Normal Roundtrip Price: $900  So
did people who got that deal save $380? Or did they save $640?
Which is it?As feedback to Scott and Brian, this actually makes me
hesitate to sign up for premium, because I don't know what level of
discount we're talking about here. A 2x difference (one way versus
RT) is significant.
 
  morgante - 5 hours ago
  Huh? I subscribe to lots of travel sites and it's pretty accepted
  that a price is round-trip unless stated otherwise.
 
  jly - 6 hours ago
  All of their listings are roundtrip.I have personally booked sub
  or around-$400 return trips to Europe from the US using this
  service.
 
  bkidwell - 6 hours ago
  Wow, thanks for the feedback!  Almost every single deal we send
  out is roundtrip. This is actually why we put "normal roundtrip
  price" instead of just "normal price" to help clarify this.Maybe
  instead we should do "Roundtrip NYC to Paris: $260" and then put
  "Normal Price: $900" to help clear this up.Thoughts?
 
    ludicast - 4 hours ago
    Agree with putting roundtrip on both.  Always my biggest
    annoyance.Even though I always assume it's RT, I still need to
    keep that state in my brain.I'm a Kidwell too btw :).
 
    wangarific - 6 hours ago
    Doesn't sound like you lose anything if you include roundtrip
 
    LarryPage - 5 hours ago
    I had the exact same question and hesitation.
 
    amelius - 5 hours ago
    Also, I'd like to filter at least on departure airport (!)
 
      rflrob - 4 hours ago
      Then perhaps you'd like to pay for the premium subscription.h
      ttps://scottscheapflights.groovehq.com/knowledge_base/topic..
      .
 
        amelius - 4 hours ago
        That wasn't clear at all when I subscribed.Anyway, I'm off
        writing a mail filter.
 
    piptastic - 5 hours ago
    Why not just put Roundtrip in both to be as clear as possible?
 
      accountyaccount - 5 hours ago
      Redundancy and specificity are slippery slopes. Why not say
      "Normally $XXX roundtrip coach redeye" because someone might
      think you're comparing a coach fare to first-class prices?I
      think the "$XXX roundtrip, normally $XXX" clarifies it enough
      without the redundancy. You wouldn't benefit from comparing a
      roundtrip price to a normal one-way fare.
 
      bkidwell - 5 hours ago
      I'd actually rather put "Past Roundtrip Deal" above the deal
      info just because of how big the word "Roundtrip" is. We have
      to keep design in mind... and if we just put RT that would
      likely lead to confusion as well.
 
        squeaky-clean - 3 hours ago
        "NYC to Paris and back: $260" is only one fewer letter but
        I feel it reads more clearly and you don't need to include
        the  "and back" in other lines of the message to get the
        point across you're comparing RT to RT.
 
    natch - 5 hours ago
    Yes you should make it absolutely 100% unambiguous because a
    lot of sites use this ambiguity intentionally for a kind of
    bait-and-switch design, and I am extremely wary of it. I think
    a lot of other people would also be very wary. It's a well
    known trick to make the price look lower by quoting the one-way
    deal even though most people are looking for roundtrip.So.. I'm
    glad to hear you do mean RT in both cases.If it's a matter of
    wanting to avoid clunky long layout for the copy, you could
    consider using RT instead of roundtrip. With a tooltip on
    hover, or some other accomodation, for people who need to know
    what that means.
 
      bkidwell - 5 hours ago
      Cool I like the tooltip idea. We're working on a lot of
      changes right now so I'll definitely keep this in mind.
 
smaili - 6 hours ago
I hate to be the one to ask, but how much moat does this actually
have?  Couldn't Kayak literally just add a subscribe or alert me
later input and have their massive infrastructure automate this
very thing?
 
  bhaile - 6 hours ago
  Some deals require specific starting and end destinations to work
  properly with a specific carrier. Others can require a stopover
  in a certain city before continuing on.The really good deals will
  even be site specific. All this can be done via good expertise.
  With scraping and this type of logic, you'd get blocked quickly
  from the major sites.
 
  morgante - 5 hours ago
  Kayak does have alert notifications.The thing is that if you're
  looking for a very specific destination, you'll almost never get
  the best deals. Flight deals work best for people who are very
  flexible about destination and timing.
 
    akg_67 - 33 minutes ago
    Second this. Some of my friends and I use Scott's emails to
    discover cheap fares to any destination. We typically don't
    have any specific destination in mind.When one of us sees
    Scott's email with attractive deal, we check Google flights for
    appropriate dates (typically 7-10 days trip) and ping each
    other to see who is interested in that trip and dates. Then we
    just book flights typically within 2-6 hours of receiving
    email. Afterward we research the destination, decide rest of
    the itinerary for the trip, and book AirBnBs.We call it travel
    easter egg hunting.
 
  biztos - 1 hours ago
  I use Kayak and Google as starting points for every flight
  search, and I still spend hours and hours finding good fares on
  good routes.This is just anecdotal, but if neither Kayak nor
  Google gets it right enough for me to use them end-to-end, I
  suspect there's a lot of room for a high-touch, human-
  intervention kind of searching.