GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-29) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How Much Sleep Do Fitbit Users Really Get?
90 points by OrwellianChild
https://blog.fitbit.com/sleep-study/
___________________________________________________________________
 
pcunite - 3 hours ago
I try to run or bike several times per week. Will be adding tennis
soon if I can. What seems to affect my sleep is occasional restless
leg. I have to get up and do stretches or use something like the
TigerTail to be able to stop the nerves from firing off. I'll toss
and turn if I don't address it.
 
  mantas - 3 hours ago
  I've similar issues once in a while. Taking a month's course of
  magnesium usually helps. Your reasons and results may vary
  though, I'm not a doctor.
 
cmiles74 - 3 hours ago
I was doubting the effectiveness of my CPAP machine and decided to
take the night off. I usually sleep close to eight hours with 3 to
4 hours of deep sleep; without the machine I  sleep about the same
time but log only 30 minutes to an hour of deep sleep.
 
  robhu - 2 hours ago
  If you have a model that stores data in an SD card you may find
  Sleepy Head useful.
 
    cmiles74 - 1 hours ago
    I will check this out. It stores data on the card, but I had
    forgotten about this. It might be interesting to see if any
    correlates with the sleep data.
 
  Mahn - 2 hours ago
  > I usually sleep close to eight hours with 3 to 4 hours of deep
  sleepSounds like you are getting better sleep than most healthy
  people. I always wondered if one could benefit from a CPAP
  machine even without suffering from sleep apnea.
 
    cmiles74 - 1 hours ago
    My partner sleeps poorly and I have wondered the same.You are
    right, I should be grateful for the machine. But the mask is a
    hassle and I find myself getting cranky about it. Still, I wear
    it every night. It was definitely reassuring to see what a
    difference it makes.I should try and talk my partner into
    trying it. ;-)
 
notheguyouthink - 3 hours ago
According to my Fitbit _(which I wear constantly)_, I get on
average ~3h45m of "sleep". It apparently doesn't count restless as
valid sleep, so it heavily eats into my sleep. Most of the ~8h
chunk I'm asleep it marks as restless.. probably not a good sign
lol.Though, I don't think I'm using their new sleep phase metrics,
as my Fitbit app doesn't seem to have it.
 
  markwaldron - 3 hours ago
  I had this issue as well but I realized my Sleep Sensitivity
  setting was on "Sensitive" rather than "Normal". Once I changed
  it, my average nights rest went up to 6h+
 
  colonelxc - 3 hours ago
  For me, the fitbit overestimates my sleep by a wide margin (and I
  stopped using it for that purpose). It assumes if I am not moving
  that I am asleep.
 
    waivej - 3 hours ago
    I had to switch it to sensitive mode for the same reason.  It's
    also more useful as a relative metric than specific number.
 
blunte - 39 minutes ago
Well, those of us with the top of the line model, the Surge, can't
really contribute to this discussion.  Why can't we contribute?
Because Fitbit has, for whatever reason, chosen not to include its
highest paying customers with the same features they've given to
their lesser models.https://community.fitbit.com/t5/Feature-
Suggestions/Sleep-St...
 
petepete - 1 hours ago
At least it has chance to measure sleep. My Android Wear device
(Huawei watch V1) has no battery by evening and has to spend the
night charging.
 
peterjlee - 3 hours ago
TIL Gen Z is a thing. I feel old. Also, I'm guessing most Gen Z
fitbit users are in college because there's no way high school kids
can wake up at 8:12AM and go to school.
 
  rb808 - 3 hours ago
  Interestingly what is the next generation after Z - are we back
  to A again?
 
    [deleted]
 
    jcdreads - 3 hours ago
    Generation [ obviously.
 
    scottLobster - 3 hours ago
    Generation Cyber, no doubt
 
    kylec - 3 hours ago
    AA probably. That's the column to the right of Z in Excel.
 
      ghostly_s - 24 minutes ago
      Nothing post-gen-Z'ers relate with more than Excel.
 
  madcaptenor - 3 hours ago
  Also, Millennials go up to 40?
 
    ProAm - 1 hours ago
    They'll never make it to 40
 
sjclemmy - 1 hours ago
> People who sleep 5 hours or less a night deprive their body of
the opportunity to get enough deep sleep, which occurs near the
beginning of the night.I'd like that explained to me. If it's
something that happens near the beginning of the night how does
duration affect it?
 
beeeebo - 32 minutes ago
Looks like my pattern I wear a mii band it was 20 bucks baby
 
wimagguc - 3 hours ago
It's interesting insight into how much sleep people actually get,
but the article mixes up actual statistics with some random data
pulled from elsewhere. What's missing is, for example, the data on
how the amount of deep sleep impacts the individual's short-term
memory, activity and "feeling refreshed" (sic).We don't actually
know where those stats come from, so this conclusion is a bit far-
fetched: "these findings further support the general recommendation
that most adults need to consistently sleep 7 to 9 hours per
night".
 
SimonPStevens - 3 hours ago
I'd take all of this with a giant pinch of salt. If the data is
anything like the sleep data generated by my Garmin vivosmart HR+
it's not much better than garbage.It frequently counts me as
sleeping when I sit down to watch TV in the evening, or read a book
in bed. Sometimes I stay up until 1am reading and it always tracks
me as deep sleep from 10pm when I got into bed. I usually take it
off for my morning shower (It is waterproof, it just annoys me when
washing) and it nearly always counts the walking from bed to shower
as a few minutes of restless sleep and the shower itself as deep
sleep.I'm not sure how it makes an assesment of my sleep level. I
don't know if it's just based on movement or if it takes heart rate
data into account but it does have a heart rate sensor. It seems to
usually be wrong.In theroy it would be possible to know about these
limitations and adjust your use of it to make it more accurate, but
unless the participents of the study are aware of that and have
been manually correcting the data then that won't be the case.(Not
a general critisim on the device, I like it for everything else,
but it's sleep data is clearly rather inaccurate)
 
  ClayM - 2 hours ago
  Mine is actually pretty good - it doesn't pick up when I sit
  down, but will occasionally turn on sleep mode while I'm lying in
  bed reading.However it marks me as awake during that sleep time,
  so I guess it's accurate?
 
  Mahn - 2 hours ago
  > It frequently counts me as sleeping when I sit down to watch TV
  in the evening, or read a book in bed. Sometimes I stay up until
  1am reading and it always tracks me as deep sleep from 10pm when
  I got into bed. I usually take it off for my morning shower (It
  is waterproof, it just annoys me when washing) and it nearly
  always counts the walking from bed to shower as a few minutes of
  restless sleep and the shower itself as deep sleep.Speaking as a
  Fitbit Charge 2 user, none of that happens with my device. I
  don't know how accurate the rest of the data is, but it does
  track sleep only when I'm actually sleeping.
 
  rodgerd - 1 hours ago
  As someone who migrated from Fitbit to Garmin, the sleep tracking
  is an awful regression - it's much, much worse with the Garmin.
 
  OrwellianChild - 2 hours ago
  These are all worthy considerations for these trackers... I can
  only speak for the Fitbits, specifically the Charge 2 (which has
  a HR monitor too).Fitbits have 2 measurement modes for sleep -
  normal and sensitive. Normal pretty much tracks me as sleeping
  like the dead for 8 hours each night (however long I'm immobile
  in bed). Sensitive, on the other hand, tracks much more detail
  and can tell when I'm restless, sleeping deeply, and even when I
  get up in the night and move around. I highly recommend the
  sensitive sleep setting for Fitbit users - it gives you more data
  to play with!Fitbit recently re-worked the way they track sleep
  in its HR-monitor-equipped devices (Charge 2, Aria HR, etc.). It
  introduced more details (it was just tracking restless/deep
  before) and this upgrade greatly improved the sleep tracking for
  me. Before Sleep Stages, it would track only 3-4 hours of my
  sleep each night. Now, it catches the full 6-9 hours.Now, all of
  this is to be taken with a grain of salt in terms of accuracy,
  but to compare among Fitbit users and to yourself over time, this
  information is incredibly useful!The strongest example of the
  usefulness of this for me so far has been the effect of moderate
  alcohol consumption on the quality of my sleep. I am far more
  restless and get much poorer sleep after drinking just 1-2 beers
  on a full stomach. This has led me to cut back almost completely
  on alcohol and the quality of my rest has dramatically improved!
 
    iClaudiusX - 2 hours ago
    How do you know if it's "catching" anything other than noise?
    Have you done any kind of comparison against a gold standard
    method like a sleep study?From what I can tell, none of these
    accelerometer-based methods work at all and the companies
    pushing these as sleep trackers are making false claims.
 
      OrwellianChild - 2 hours ago
      Like I said, accuracy isn't so much the goal... The readouts
      I get show pretty consistent measurements over time, which
      gives me enough confidence to compare them to other Fitbit
      users among my friends/family as well as to myself over time
      (see the alcohol anecdote above).Setting the sensitivity to
      "normal" just raises the noise floor in their filter so high
      that it obscures the data.On sensitive, I've never had issues
      with it identifying "sitting" as "sleeping", yet it still
      effectively tracks my sleep (including periods of wakefulness
      immediately pre- and post- slumber in bed as well as mid-
      night disruptions that wake me up). This suggests that I'm
      getting pretty good data (though not equivalent to a sleep
      study with ECG/EKG equipment). In this case, "good" is good
      enough for my uses.
 
      SEJeff - 2 hours ago
      I've done a sleep study at a hospital to see if I was an
      actual insomniac or had sleep apnea. It turns out I slept
      like absolute crap at the study mainly because the thing they
      put up my nose tickled my nose hairs and the thing on my head
      was uncomfortable, so I just was restless the entire night.
 
    0xffff2 - 2 hours ago
    >The strongest example of the usefulness of this for me so far
    has been the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on the
    quality of my sleep. I am far more restless and get much poorer
    sleep after drinking just 1-2 beers on a full stomach.I'm
    curious, did you not notice this before? I have an MS Band, but
    the sleep tracking seems similar to the new Fitbit tracking. It
    did give me some concrete data on how drinking affects my
    sleep, but that data wasn't really valuable because I already
    knew that drinking too much or too late would have a negative
    impact on my sleep because I felt tired the next morning.
 
      OrwellianChild - 2 hours ago
      For me, it was the difference between assumptions/inferences
      and repeatable measurements... Being typically human, I was
      able to be unobservant, post-rationalize my poor sleep,
      believe I still had the drinking constitution of a 20-year-
      old, and otherwise ignore the effects.Having months of daily
      Fitbit records that I could look back on well after I forgot
      about my "rough morning" the following day drove the point
      home as only hard data could.
 
  devbent - 1 hours ago
  > It frequently counts me as sleeping when I sit down to watch TV
  in the evening, or read a book in bed.This is why I pushed for
  sleep on v1 of Microsoft Band to be manually triggered.
  Eventually cloud detected sleep was lit up, but we benefited from
  lots of gathered data at that point, but even so, it is a hard
  problem to solve. The best solution would be per user training,
  allowing users to correct auto detection and use that to improve
  future tracking, but AFAIK no one in industry is doing that.> I'm
  not sure how it makes an assesment of my sleep level. I don't
  know if it's just based on movement or if it takes heart rate
  data into accountThis is an incredibly hard problem. For sleep
  studies, multiple doctors look over all the vitals gathered (and
  for a full sleep clinic study, subjects are very wired up!) And
  to determine when the subject is in a given phase of sleep, they
  vote, and it is not always a consensus decision![0] Trying to
  then make a machine algorithm out of that is difficult,
  especially working with consumer level sensors.That said, across
  most users, data tend to be mostly correct, which is what these
  consumer devices target. Being able to say someone got 7.5hrs of
  sleep is good enough, the 10 minute bathroom break doesn't impact
  the overall numbers too much. Being able to give a good summary
  of weeks and months is huge, and being able to spot large
  regressions and improvements is key to user satisfaction.The
  ultimate goal is to gather a lot of data, noise or not, run it
  through machine learning, and start being able to give people
  actionable advice that they will see real results from.[0] this
  was relayed to me by the team who doing sleep classification,
  other sleep studies may happen differently.
 
  [deleted]
 
johnchristopher - 3 hours ago
FWIW I have been using a flex 2 for two weeks now and I couldn 't
believe how I messed up my sleep. I was a trainwreck and going for
no more than 5 hours per night while misevaluating  my sleep time
to 7-8h. I decided to break the cycle and I have been sleeping much
more for one week and already can see the difference. I think I
should have bought an alta or a charge to get the benefits of the
HR monitor. Still, I am glad I bought one. It was a reality check.
And I bought it because I really wanted an vibrating wrist alarm.
 
  asselinpaul - 2 hours ago
  How is the vibrating alarm? Is it a nicer experience in the
  morning?
 
    heywire - 1 hours ago
    I have the Fitbit Blaze and I really like the vibrating alarm.
    I have it set a few minutes before my phone alarm.  It always
    wakes me up so I have time to pick up my phone and kill the
    alarm before it wakes my wife.  I also find I'm less "startled"
    by the vibration than the alarm sound (though using alarm
    sounds which increase in volume over time help that too).
 
      OrwellianChild - 35 minutes ago
      This has been my experience as well... Coming out of deep
      sleep to a blaring alarm clock is about the worst case
      scenario. If I can get natural light or a vibrating alarm to
      "warn" me, I'm much more receptive to the strong alarm and
      able to become alert much more quickly.Right now, I don't
      have much control over ambient light, but I'd like to find a
      solution. I think that probably means automatically opening
      window shades in the summer (anyone tried this?) and, since I
      live in Seattle, a 10 KW spotlight rigged to a timer in the
      winter...
 
  Swizec - 3 hours ago
  Similar story here. I always thought I slept like the dead and
  nothing short of a force of nature could wake me.Fitbit rolled
  out their new sleep types tracking and I find out I'm actually a
  super light sleeper. Most nights I don't get anywhere near the
  low-end benchmark for Deep Sleep and I overshoot the high-end
  benchmark for Light Sleep by many points.It's weird because my
  subjective experience and the data that Fitbit shows are so out
  of whack. I could swear that I sleep well, but nope.
 
    E6300 - 3 hours ago
    Crazy thought, but perhaps the device is actually pretty
    terrible at measuring when the user is asleep? Wrist-band
    heart-rate monitors are known to be fairly less accurate than
    chest-band HRMs.
 
    just4themoney - 2 hours ago
    I hate to be so pessimistic but since Fitbit doesn't measure
    brain waves (among many other things) any "sleep" data
    generated by the Fitbit is somewhere between those novelty love
    tester machines and random bits in accuracy. Don't trust it
    over your subjective experience.
 
    0xffff2 - 2 hours ago
    >I could swear that I sleep well, but nope.Who's really right
    here then? I'm curious, if you have some nights where the
    Fitbit says you sleep better or worse than average, does that
    correlate with your subjective experience?
 
  kdamken - 3 hours ago
  If you get one with the HR tracking, you get more detailed info
  on your sleep stages -
  https://help.fitbit.com/articles/en_US/Help_article/2163I'm with
  you though. I thought I was doing a good job on sleep and then
  picked up a Charge 2 and was super surprised at just how little I
  was getting. It's helped me get better at going to bed at a
  reasonable hour.
 
    KGIII - 3 hours ago
    How accurate are these things, really?I don't sleep much, I
    never have. However, I can pretty much shut my body down and
    meditate, which probably has similar outward physiological
    expressions as sleep.I call it my time in my rejuvenation
    center. It isn't sleep. I'll do that for hours and then get
    three to five hours of sleep - estimating, of course.When I did
    my sleep study, they asked me to not do that. So, I sat there
    awake and it was not a very fruitful study. I am sure I am not
    unique but I am only finding generic information when I search.
 
      WalterSear - 2 hours ago
      Are you aware of the condition known as Pseudoinsomnia?
 
        KGIII - 2 hours ago
        I am. But, in thus case, I can tell you when the dog got on
        the bed, when the missus moved, etc... I'm very much awake
        and alert to my surroundings.
 
          E6300 - 2 hours ago
          So it's basically a nap?
 
          [deleted]
 
          WalterSear - 2 hours ago
          You can be aware of those things in lighter levels of
          sleep. Some of the protocols used in lucid dreaming
          research rely on it.
 
          KGIII - 1 hours ago
          I could but I think I will trust the doctor. We had this
          conversation. I can just lay there and do something, but
          I prefer to meditate as it seems to offer some level of
          rejuvenation.
 
          WalterSear - 1 hours ago
          I'm not sure I follow.
 
          KGIII - 54 minutes ago
          By slowing myself down to a restful position, it affords
          some of the same benefits of sleep. I am very much awake
          for those few hours, and then I fall asleep. There's no
          pseudoinsomnia involved.I stay nearly perfectly still,
          inasmuch as a human can, and meditate. Once I am asleep,
          I guess I toss and turn, as well as snore. I highly doubt
          that I am unique, in these regards.The proscribed medical
          solution is a rotation of pharmacutical sleep aids. I
          don't usually bother with them, as I dislike the groggy
          feeling that I have the following day.But yeah, I am very
          much awake. My pulse rate slows, as does my respiration.
          At some point, I'll change position and that's when I
          have actually fallen asleep. The duration varies, and I
          sometimes just give up and go do something else.
 
          emmelaich - 8 minutes ago
          Prescribed?  Proscribed means forbidden.
 
  0xffff2 - 2 hours ago
  Just curious, could you elaborate on how you were so far off on
  your sleep estimation? Microsoft's Band has had this feature
  since its inception, and while the graphs are pretty, I found it
  utterly useless. My personal experience was that it told me
  exactly what I already knew.
 
punjabisingh - 3 hours ago
The sleep tracking from my FitBit is my favorite feature. Even the
cheapest FitBit Flex provides good analysis of my sleep (restless,
awake, duration, etc). I use it more to make sure I get 7-8 hours
to sleep than to count steps.Disclosure: volunteer beta tester
 
racl101 - 1 hours ago
I have a Fitbit and love to use it for step counting but I sure as
heck don't sleep with that thing.
 
OrwellianChild - 4 hours ago
I am almost exactly typical in hours of sleep and mix of sleep type
to the aggregate. What's hidden is all the volatility in my
sleep... In my last week, there is a range from 5.5 to 8.3 hours of
sleep in a given night. The longest sleep nights don't necessarily
follow the short sleep nights either, so it doesn't appear to be
catch-up sleep. Weird body is weird.Other interesting notes:1.
Women need an extra half hour?2. People sleep less as they age?3.
"Generation Z" is what we're calling kids these days?
 
  monksy - 2 hours ago
  >  Women need an extra half hour?Could be differences in daily
  stress and work life that interferes with sleep and the ability
  to fall asleep.
 
    carlob - 54 minutes ago
    I think on average in western countries women actually work
    more much more than men when you consider house chores and
    childcare as work.
 
  pcunite - 3 hours ago
  2. People sleep less as they age?In my experience a lot of older
  people seem to say this. Note sure why it's true.
 
    ProAm - 3 hours ago
    > In my experience a lot of older people seem to say this. Note
    sure why it's true.Because after age 30 your body, more or
    less, starts to die.  There is a lot of discomfort and pain
    that is usually associated with this and as a result affects
    the quality and duration of sleep.
 
    swift - 3 hours ago
    In the case of my own family members, this seems to stem from
    physical maladies that are correlated with age - back injuries,
    for example, or weight increases aggravating sleep apnea. I'm
    not sure how things look for old people who are extremely
    healthy, though.
 
      Someone - 3 hours ago
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/00319384879.
      ..:"The mean sleep duration (from PAM) equaled 7.29?0.8
      (S.D.) hr compared to 7.84?0.62 hr as estimated from the
      daily diaries. Neither parameter was correlated significantly
      with age (p>0.05)"(N=43, 9 days, age range 21-83)
 
Sir_Substance - 1 hours ago
I know that fitbit thinks this is really cool, but this is really
creepy.Everyone who owns a fitbit has doubtless signed off on being
part of these kinds of studies if you dig all the way into fitbits
EULA, but I bet none of them actually got an email saying "click
here to opt in/out". For a lot of fitbit users, they will never see
this study and it will never cross their mind that they're being
studied.This is why I searched high and low for a fitness tracker
that doesn't have an online component. I eventually settled on a
garman fitness watch plugged into turtle sport:
http://turtlesport.sourceforge.net/EN/home.html
 
tejaswiy - 3 hours ago
Since noone's asked this question yet, how accurate is using
movement / heart-rate as a proxy for EEG when estimating sleep
patterns?
 
  pizza - 3 hours ago
  This is related https://www.livescience.com/42710-fitness-
  trackers-sleep-mon...
 
  ared38 - 3 hours ago
  Mine didn't have HR monitoring, but I found the movement (aka
  actigraphy) to be pretty much useless. Fitbit was counting all
  the time I was laying still trying to fall asleep as "deep
  sleep", and looking at the chart I couldn't differentiate
  movement at 12:00 when I knew I was awake from movement at 6:00
  when a noise woke me up but I fell right back asleep.The movement
  data is probably enough to tell when I've slept better or worse,
  but I wouldn't trust the absolute "number of hours of sleep" they
  report.
 
  2muchcoffeeman - 1 hours ago
  And are there any good sleep trackers?
 
    criddell - 1 hours ago
    Zeo made a very good one called something like Zeo Sleep
    Manager. They stopped making them a few years ago, but you can
    still find them online and there's a fairly active community
    around them still.
 
      Hydraulix989 - 21 minutes ago
      Yes, and the Zeo is a REAL sleep tracker in the sense that it
      uses EEG -- not accelerometers -- as sensors (where the
      latter actually don't measure anything that has to do with
      sleep, just a proxy that is somewhat correlated but also
      easily fooled). Remember, when you get a real lab sleep study
      done, the primary measurement of sleep is via the spectral
      powers of your brain waves via EEG -- these measurements
      represent your sleep stages, by definition.
 
Skunkleton - 2 hours ago
These types of articles often have a correlation vs causation
problem. For example, the article says that if you want better deep
sleep, then move your bed time to between 9 and 10 PM.  Ok, sure
the data shows that people who go to bed at this time have more
deep sleep, but why? Maybe it is a longer window to sleep in
without light/noise? Maybe people with fewer sleep problems go to
bed earlier? Is it because going to bed at 9:30 is magic?What am I
supposed to take away from this?
 
ram_rar - 2 hours ago
Unless there is some kind of sensor in the pillow, which can
calibrate your sleep. None of these fitness trackers can accurately
measure your sleep.
 
  eduren - 2 hours ago
  What makes a "pillow sensor" more accurate? Is there anything
  like that on the market?
 
    ram_rar - 2 hours ago
    Sony has patented in this area.
    https://www.engadget.com/2013/02/08/sony-patent-application-...
 
      eduren - 1 hours ago
      You're honestly comparing the accuracy of a product out in
      the market, with one in the patent stages back in 2013?I
      understand being skeptical of the accelerometer + hr monitor
      solution, there are certainly more involved ways of analyzing
      patterns that are available to sleep specialists. But how
      does it help the discussion to dismiss it in favor of a non-
      existent product?
 
        ram_rar - 1 hours ago
        My point is, a sensor in the pillow might be more accurate
        in tracking your sleep than a fitness tracker.  Thats all!
 
  haswell - 2 hours ago
  It really comes down to how much accuracy you really need. I use
  a Fitbit Charge HR and while I'm sure it's not perfect, it gives
  me a general idea of how much time I spend in bed/sleeping.I'm
  sure it's not accurate down to the minute, but I do think it
  gives me a general idea of how much sleep I get. For me, that's
  fine, and really all I need.
 
huangc10 - 2 hours ago
It'll be really interesting to see the sleep data compared against
other countries or continents. Sex and age is interesting but you
can't tell much from this data. Could comparing it with other
countries correlate with a country's economy, culture, general
state of affairs? Also, if there is a year to year trend cross
reference with country.If this data is accurate, it could be useful
in determining a country's future economics. Ie. perhaps a general
population's 5 mins of average less sleep means more stress which
means more economic downturn/changes?