GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-29) - page 2 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The nationwide roll-out of the 911 system was a difficult endeavor
79 points by peeze
http://tedium.co/2017/06/20/911-emergency-system-history/
___________________________________________________________________
 
johansch - 3 hours ago
That font is so horrible. :/
 
thspimpolds - 6 hours ago
while I want to read this article, that font makes it impossible.
 
  kalleboo - 6 hours ago
  Firefox reading mode seems to work just fine on this page
 
  binarycrusader - 6 hours ago
  I think you're being a bit overdramatic, or there's a difference
  between your configuration and mine (FireFox Desktop).  I find it
  quite readable, pleasantly so even.
 
    sp332 - 5 hours ago
    The color of the body text is (102,102,102). That cuts your
    contrast just about in half.
 
      kuschku - 19 minutes ago
      Which is awesome if you have a monitor with 1000 nits or
      more, as (0,0,0) to (255,255,255) has a blinding contrast on
      them.The basic issue is that CSS colors are defined in terms
      of relative brightness of the monitor, and not within of a
      proper colorspace. Most browsers assume sRGB, but many users
      don?t even have that.In sRGB, a contrast of (102,102,102) to
      (255,255,255) is a very pleasant, and perfectly readable
      contrast.But many users are on shitty 6-bit color depth 100
      nits or less displays.
 
Animats - 3 hours ago
The original 911 system was rolled out when many phone switches
were electromechanical.  Step-by-step and crossbar offices didn't
log calls, didn't pass line identification data with the call, and
couldn't route based on the source of the call.  But they had hard-
wired relay logic in the originating registers (the units that
receive dial digits) to recognize area codes (second digit 1 or 0
back then) and service numbers (second and third digits 1).  Those
were forwarded to a toll office, along with automatic line
identification info. So 911 was forwarded to a toll office, like a
long distance call. "999" was considered as the emergency number;
the UK used that. But US switches didn't have a special case for
999, so that was hard to retrofit. Hence 911.Toll offices, which
handled long distance calls, were computerized by then.  They could
be upgraded to deal with 911 routing.  This requires a database to
map phone numbers to the appropriate Public Safety Answering Point.
The idea of having a computer with a disk drive in the call chain
was radical at the time, but it was made to work.  The original
computers for this were Western Electric 3B machines, set up as
duplex pairs.The toll office 911 system became a problem with the
breakup of AT&T.  AT&T retained most of the toll switches, while
the local exchange carriers got the local offices.  (Now, of
course, with weak antitrust enforcement, they've all merged back
together again.)
 
bungie4 - 4 hours ago
My job is upgrading and maintaining 911 and other life safety
systems.The article is correct, advancing technologies are not
reflected by additional capabilities by PSAPs, DISA's or ILEC's
(The ppl that foward your call to a responder).  It was only
recently that IP based 911 sending of ANI/ALI (Telephone/Location
data) data has been implemented on a large scale. In Canada, it ran
on an old packet switched network for ages!Their are different
flavors of 911. E911 (Enhanced), V911 for VoIP phones, and recently
the addition of Wifi based calling among others.  The original 911
systems was designed when phones were static, they didn't move.
Nowadays, with cell, voip and now, wifi devices, theirs no telling
where the call (device) originates from.  Yes, most send long/lat
data, but that is based on triangulation of cell towers and not
accurate enough. To further complicate things, long/lat doesn't
take into account altitude. In a urban setting, the responders
maybe at ground level wondering just which building and floor
originated the call (yes, their systems to deal with this but not
widely implemented, and, failing that, if the caller is unable to
speak, you have a larger issue).Most responders don't even have the
ability to map a long/lat. So at this point, the accuracy is
moot.All that being said. The E911 system works well.
Cell/VoIP/Wifi, not so much. The call will generate a response, but
it's hardly efficient.
 
  MichaelGG - 4 hours ago
  Then there's the idea that they'll go totally internet based,
  allowing forwarding or conferencing in multiple psaps,
  translators, etc. Somehow, they're supposed to secure all this,
  but I'm doubtful. It'd be one of the largest secure federated
  networks in the world I think. And they aren't exactly tech
  savvy. Doing one of the first wide-scale VoIP 911 services, we
  had psaps call us to say they wouldn't take phone calls from VoIP
  users, even on their landlines, because "they might send us
  viruses".NENA folks also wanted the FCC to mandate an IP location
  system to be available on every Internet connection - what a
  privacy mess that'd be, when any app with IP access could get
  your exact location down to the apt number.I trie experimenting
  with what I named "Advanced 911". For calls to places where we
  couldn't deliver location info, we'd prompt the answer to press a
  key to have us speak the info. But getting adoption for that was
  super difficult.Also, the stress involved in those jobs, wow. I
  thought I could handle stuff, but auditing problem calls where
  people were dying, panicking, and didn't know where they were -
  that's traumatic. Also made me really dislike how cavalier 911 is
  handled by the telecos.
 
    bungie4 - 3 hours ago
    We have dedicated staff whose job it is to audit calls.  ALL
    calls are recorded and we do screen snaps every 5 seconds, or,
    anytime the screen changes. Were talking terabytes of data. We
    keep it going back many years.I'll vouch for the stress of the
    job.  If I f'up. Somebody can die. Same thing for the
    operators. They get 3 months of training before handling calls.
    Most wash out before their training is completed.  Most,
    shortly after that. The churn is unbelievable. We hire
    constantly. All operators max out their sick/vacation days.
    It's an unpleasant, boring, terrifying job.
 
      eropple - 3 hours ago
      This sounds like an interesting technical problem. If you're
      up for chatting about it further, I'd be interested in
      hearing more about it--my email's in my profile.
 
        bungie4 - 2 hours ago
        It's not really a technical problem, it's an adoption/money
        problem.
 
  eropple - 4 hours ago
  > Most responders don't even have the ability to map a long/lat.
  So at this point, the accuracy is moot.This is genuinely
  surprising to me. The operators having trouble makes sense,
  because phones are something of a rolling disaster, but
  responders aren't using GPSes that can do this?
 
    bungie4 - 4 hours ago
    I'm sorry, I should clarify. Their are many layers of
    'responders', their maybe just one, your call was routed to the
    local police. It may have been routed to call center in that
    area, who in turn broker the call, etc.Imagine a situation
    where your traveling down an interstate out in the boonies.
    Theirs a wreck. You call 911 from your cell.  The responder
    will receive an approximation of your location, likely the
    closet cell tower. From that, and before being able to send a
    responder, they must determine WHO to call based on your
    location. Just because your closer to town B than town A
    doesn't mean town B gets the call.  Town B may forward your
    call to town A.  Then, you have to determine where to dispatch
    too.  It's doubtful you know the closest mile marker. Only your
    direction of travel, and the last area that you can
    remember.It's strictly a best effort.
 
      mindcrime - 3 hours ago
      It may have been routed to call center in that area, who in
      turn broker the call, etc.Yep.  I was a 911 dispatcher for a
      while and can confirm this.  I worked for Brunswick County
      (NC) 911, which borders New Hanover County (NC), Columbus
      County (NC) and Horry County (SC).  Cell phone calls were
      usually sent to the right place, but if you were way out in
      the boonies on highway 211 near the Brunswick / Columbus
      line, if was about 50/50 which 911 center would get the call.
      And we'd occasionally get a call that was dialed in New
      Hanover County, Horry County, and - rarely - even further
      away.   So on those calls, we had to try and quickly
      determine exactly where the caller was, so we could relay the
      information to the other county for dispatch.   Sometimes if
      we weren't exactly sure and the call seemed to be near the
      line, we'd dispatch units and request the neighboring county
      to dispatch theirs as well, and then let the responders
      figure it out when the arrived.I took a call once that, as
      far as I could tell, turned out to be several counties
      over... something like Pender or Duplin County.  We didn't
      even have their contact info logged anywhere, since it was
      thought (at the time) that there would never be any need for
      us to contact, say, Duplin County.  I had to call New Hanover
      County, ask them if they had the number for Pender (who they
      border), then call them, etc.  The term "clusterfuck" comes
      to mind, but luckily that only ever happened once that I can
      remember.Note that this was in the mid 90's and I'm not sure
      if things are better, worse, or the same now.
 
      eropple - 4 hours ago
      Gotcha - thank you for the detailed response.
 
rootsudo - 1 hours ago
If you want to see an emerging country try it nowadays, look at the
Philippines.They basically gave up. Though the telecoms are a
duopoly.  Only working 911 system is in Davao.Everywhere else you
have independent short codes like 117 which may not be answered.
Ironic for most of the BPO is outsourced call center agents.Then
the second issue are jokes,http://news.abs-
cbn.com/news/08/01/16/dial-8888-911-govt-ope..."Hotline 911
received 2,475 recorded calls, between 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. Monday.
Out of the total, only 75 calls were legitimate while the 1,119
were dropped and 1,356 were prank calls."In other news, I've not
yet needed it.
 
kalleboo - 6 hours ago
An example of the drawbacks of decentralization - meanwhile in
Sweden, 98% of phones were already covered by the "90 000"
emergency number by 1965.
 
  bostonpete - 6 hours ago
  Wow, that must've taken forever to dial on a rotary phone.
 
    trendia - 4 hours ago
    Still better than 0118 999 881 999 119
    7253https://youtube.com/watch?v=ab8GtuPdrUQ
 
      bdamm - 3 hours ago
      And better than a cell phone, where dialing 911 results in
      the phone locking, then crashing.I've actually had this
      happen in an emergency. I can't tell you how dismayed I was
      that my phone crashed when I called 911.
 
        nunez - 35 minutes ago
        were you running cyanogenmod? i remember one version of
        that ROM having e911 issues
 
        jxramos - 1 hours ago
        goodness, what a thought ><. Not too far back we called 911
        on a cell phone that we didn't know had the microphone
        shorted when it had gotten wet earlier in the day but
        otherwise was completely operational. Took several minutes
        to figure out what was going on. I think we wound up
        texting a friend that we'd call them and to verify they
        could hear us or not. We wound up having a headset handy
        luckily enough.
 
      satsuma - 3 hours ago
      Sometimes I have a hard time watching IT Crowd because I see
      too much of myself/my coworkers in the characters.
 
    kalleboo - 5 hours ago
    On Swedish rotary phones the 0 was on the other side (one
    pulse)
 
      freestockoption - 5 hours ago
      0 indexed! :)
 
      waqf - 3 hours ago
      What?! What happened when you made an international call, did
      you have to subtract 1 from all the digits?
 
        gpvos - 3 hours ago
        In 1965 there wasn't much international direct dialling
        yet; mainly to neighbouring countries. The rest was done
        via an operator. International exchanges tended to buffer
        the entire called phone number anyway, even back in
        electromechanical times, which meant they could also
        translate the pulses if that would have been necessary.
 
[deleted]
 
spectre - 24 minutes ago
There's some interesting technical history behind some of the
emergency number choices:999 in the UK (from 1937) was chosen
because public payphone could be easily modified to make it a free
call.111 in New Zealand (from 1958) was chosen because the system
was implemented using British Post Office equipment that already
supported 999. But New Zealand phones pulsed in reverse so 111 on a
New Zealand phone produced the same pulse as 999 on a British
phone.000 in Australia (from 1961) was chosen because 0 was already
used for trunk access. On an automated rural exchange, 0 would
connect you to a main centre. In remote communities it was 00. This
meant that dialing 000 through an existing remote exchange would at
least connect you to an operator in a main centre.
 
[deleted]
 
justizin - 4 hours ago
I once worked at a bourgeoning hosting provider who had one of the
higher floors in a building that was condemned, but couldn't be
torn down because it was home to a phone switching room that had
been a part of the original 911, and the designers of technology
then simply did not even imagine their systems being EOLed, so it
turns out, no living or dead being knows how.  I'm curious to know
if that's still standing.The freight elevator shaft had a shattered
wooden freight elevator carriage at the bottom of it.  We took the
stairs.
 
mercurysmessage - 6 hours ago
I'd like to see one on the roll-out of Japans Earthquake Early
Warning System.
 
  tjohns - 5 hours ago
  Totally agree. I'd really love to see Japan's ETWS system rolled
  out on the US west coast.I was in Japan earlier this year, and
  happened to be watching TV when the earthquake warning system cut
  in. It gave about 5-10 seconds of advance warning before an
  earthquake hit. Enough time to move out of the way of anything
  heavy. It's quite impressive.If anyone's curious, this is what it
  looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAxxZkpV0HI(The
  earthquake early warning cuts in at 0:15, and a tsunami warning
  automatically cuts in at 2:34... though most of the tsunami
  warning is cut off at the end. This is what the full
  earthquake+tsunami warning sequence looks like:
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMNu8Y1jIlU)
 
    Theodores - 2 hours ago
    Thanks for posting - I will be re-using those video clips at an
    appropriate time to warn of workplace upheavals etc.
 
nvusuvu - 6 hours ago
Article misses that little ol' Haleyville, Alabama was the first
city to roll-out 911.
 
  cperciva - 5 hours ago
  It was the first city to use those particular numbers, but the
  service existed as 999 elsewhere before it was introduced to the
  USA.
 
    macintux - 4 hours ago
    999 on a rotary dial phone? Dear heavens.
 
      gpvos - 2 hours ago
      That was, and still is, in the UK. Efficiency is apparently
      not their strong point.
 
        macintux - 2 hours ago
        I assume rotary dial phones are now all but extinct. I used
        one about 20 years ago (to win free tickets from a radio
        station, and succeeded!) but even then they were rare.
 
          gpvos - 2 hours ago
          Yeah, but according to the article, 999 was introduced in
          1937.
 
        [deleted]
 
      throwaway91111 - 3 hours ago
      Hard to dial accidentally, but no much thought involved.
 
        walshemj - 1 hours ago
        All the 9's was used as you could get a high winds which
        would cause a 1 to be generated accidently (this was
        telegraph poles)