GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-29) - page 2 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Rise of the Thought Leader
110 points by imartin2k
https://newrepublic.com/article/143004/rise-thought-leader-how-s...
___________________________________________________________________
 
frgtpsswrdlame - 5 hours ago
Dan Drezner also spoke on his book at the lawfare podcast, I found
it quite a good listen:https://www.lawfareblog.com/lawfare-podcast-
ideas-industry
 
soared - 3 hours ago
Its comical how everyone in this thread shits on thought leaders,
put then praise PG in his thread on insurance. He didn't intend to
become one, but thousands of people read (literally) "Thoughts on
Insurance". He is  by definition a thought leader. Like anything in
this world, some are bad and some are good.
 
  [deleted]
 
  robotresearcher - 3 hours ago
  Thoughts on InsuranceBy Aaron Harris
 
    soared - 2 hours ago
    That is fair, but my point still stands. I didn't see the
    byline, just the domain and the writing style.
 
      eduren - 2 hours ago
      >but my point still standsDoes it though? You're criticizing
      people praising PG but using an article not written by him as
      the example. If you have another example that's written by PG
      and relevant to your point then please edit your comment to
      use that.
 
    api - 2 hours ago
    That's a fantastic example of something that's very wrong with
    the Internet socially.I heard someone the other day talking
    about a "great article they read from Medium." I asked "who
    wrote it?" They didn't know. Medium is a magazine that doesn't
    pay it's writers. Genius.
 
  [deleted]
 
mabub24 - 5 hours ago
I was recently at a conference run by a progressive political think
tank. I was surprised and confused by the way some of the speakers
discussed AI, "innovation", entrepreneurship, and technology.They
basically all repeated a number of the same points.1. AI will be
amazing, and will utterly decimate jobs in the future, though it
was never clear whether they understood AI technologies or even the
economics of automation.2. Everyone should be trying to become an
entrepreneur. Disruption is a panacea.3. Technology is the future.
But, they use about 1,000,000 different definitions of technology
and give little heed to social ramifcations of some of the
technologies.4. Everyone in the future will work on a contract
basis and this is amazing. They gave little thought to many of the
long term benefits usually associated with careers.5. "Nudging"
will be THE tool of governments in the future, with little thought
to the ramifications to democracy and liberal values.There was such
a small bandwidth of opinion and argument it was hilarious. They
were basically all repeating boiler plate stuff you read in a lot
of these "thought leader" books.
 
  emodendroket - 3 hours ago
  Sounds like most of them are really more thought followers, then.
 
  Spooky23 - 45 minutes ago
  You're misunderstanding what a think tank is. It's a place that
  gets money from places and is a parking lot for displaced
  political people. They aren't there to have original thoughts --
  they are there to support the perspective of whomever is signing
  the checks. What they say isn't very important, but what they
  don't say is critical.Ditto for political people like cabinet
  members and CEO types. In public, their outward messaging needs
  to be tightly controlled. Behind the scenes for smart ones, their
  personal thoughts or agendas are often very different.
 
  wmeredith - 3 hours ago
  These are thought followers, and by definition there are more of
  them than leaders.
 
    emodendroket - 3 hours ago
    Perhaps "thought leader" is simply a misnomer.
 
    mabub24 - 3 hours ago
    That is true.One caveat, though: these people were all CEOs or
    senior consultants or occupying high level cabinet positions in
    federal and provincial governments (some were actually
    premiers). These people, if not "thought leaders" are certainly
    modelling themselves in that image and, perhaps worse, unlike
    "thought leaders" they are the people at the steering wheel of
    many important things -- they are leaders. One would hope they
    would be less suceptible to fads, but alas.
 
      paulsutter - 1 hours ago
      Think how difficult it would be for a young Mark Zuckerberg
      or Larry Page to advance within that group of people. It
      would be impossible.That's because these "elite" circles
      favor political skills, extroverted people with low
      conviction.Peter Thiel points out that most original thinkers
      are introverted with high conviction, like Mark or Larry.
      That seems to be the formula for success in technology.
 
  pcunite - 5 hours ago
  Its part of the game:Stand up and shout loudly. You'll be taken
  seriously by some, given money or resources by others, talked
  about, and blogged about. Now, use that energy flowing your
  direction to create books, talks, and materials.
 
  projectramo - 5 hours ago
  Why can't you just enjoy the disruptive potential of complex
  algo-intelligence deployed for the incremental betterment of a
  functioning economy?(Looking for an agent)
 
    maxxxxx - 1 hours ago
    Can I preorder your book?
 
  RUTHLESS_RUFUS - 2 hours ago
  To borrow from the article, it sounds like you experienced
  another "TED talk on a recursive loop."
 
  Animats - 4 hours ago
  What conference?
 
tomc1985 - 4 hours ago
The entire pursuit of "thought leadership" is a joke. If someone
purposefully seeks thought leadership then they are probably
incapable of truly demonstrating it. Thought leaders don't try to
become thought leaders, they become so by focusing on their areas
of expertise
 
  natmaster - 39 minutes ago
  It is not sufficient to advance understanding and ideas beyond
  the rest of civilization. These ideas must be communicated as
  well.
 
  kyleschiller - 4 hours ago
  An example from the article, Sheryl Sandberg, has hardly become a
  thought leader by trying to become one, there's nothing about the
  achievement that requires an intentional pursuit.
 
    imartin2k - 3 hours ago
    I first wanted to agree with you, but then I thought: If a
    business executive writes a book which is built around some
    kind of encouraging mantra, then isn't this an explicit (or at
    least implicit) choice to become a thought leader?However, I am
    unsure whether she fits into the narrative of this piece, as
    her thought leadership would just be a side effect and result
    of her business career in a male-dominated industry.
 
  sillysaurus3 - 1 hours ago
  This is mistaken. For example, pg became a thought leader by
  attempting to become one.You can disagree with how influential
  his ideas were, but it's hard to disagree with the results. If
  not for his essays, there's a good chance YC wouldn't
  exist.You're right that the most effective thought leaders don't
  call themselves that, though.
 
    GuiA - 34 minutes ago
    I think you have it backwards.PG's writing got the influence it
    has mainly because of his startup's success, and later
    YC's.There are thousands of nerds with blogs musing about LISP
    and why nerds are the smartest kids in high school even though
    everyone thinks they're so lame; there's only one nerd that has
    such a blog along with a multi-million dollar startup buyout
    and multi-billion dollar startup accelerator.If PG had never
    sold viaweb or started YC, no one would care about his blog.
 
      sillysaurus3 - 18 minutes ago
      HN's original users came directly from pg's site, and HN is
      largely responsible for YC's meteoric success. His audience
      was in the hundreds of thousands, so without an audience none
      of that would have happened. And the audience came for his
      ideas.You're right that money was a necessary ingredient, but
      it wasn't sufficient.
 
  davidw - 4 hours ago
  My favorite 'thought leader':
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Shing
 
    booleandilemma - 4 hours ago
    It seems that his only credentials are his hair.
 
  CalChris - 1 hours ago
  This reminds me of the Zen koan, if you meet the Buddha on the
  road, kill him. [1][1] http://www.dailybuddhism.com/archives/670
 
et1337 - 4 hours ago
This article desperately tries to pin the thought leader phenomenon
on billionaires, but I don't buy it. Billionaires are certainly
susceptible, but plenty of poor people believe this stuff too. The
article even tries to cleanly separate academia from TED talks et.
al., but I know plenty of people who came out of their masters /
PhD spouting stuff like this.
 
  hasbroslasher - 1 hours ago
  You're mincing words - first, the author uses "the wealthy" about
  twice as much "billionaire". Second, billionaire is sometimes
  used as a stand-in for "the superrich". "Millionaire" sounds a
  little too ho-hum these days, I guess.Anyway - the problem isn't
  that wealthy or poor people believe the kind of garbage that
  comes out of TED talks, it's that they fund it! The wealthy buy
  the books, the wealthy go to the conferences, the wealthy give
  them seats on their News Media channels or feature their talks
  prominently on their news websites. The wealthy run the
  Universities that give people their doctorates that legitimize
  their wacky capitalistic ethos. The poor can repost a TED Talk to
  Facebook, and that's about as far as their power to influence
  goes. The truly poor do not even have the money to buy 8
  plagiarized Fareed Zakaria books.It's worth mentioning, also, how
  little you need to make to be "wealthy" in America. With
  generational wealth playing such a big factor in people's
  finances, merely NOT having mountains of debt or being in good
  health are game changers. Throw a $100k salary on top of that
  (that's more than 75% of people make) and you're living large
  enough to buy a Fareed Zakaria book every hour for the rest of
  your life if you so needed.
 
  j2kun - 4 hours ago
  > plenty of people who came out of their masters / PhD spouting
  stuff like this.This is a good point, but I think it speaks more
  to the degradation of the PhD as a signal, due to universities
  disproportionately caring about graduation rates and pushing
  unqualified students through the system.
 
  marcelluspye - 4 hours ago
  What I took away is that while plenty of poor people might
  believe/agree with thought leaders, it's the rich who enable
  them, by giving them a platform. I'd say the article is not so
  much academics vs. "thought leaders" as it is intellectuals (i.e.
  people who apply a critical lens to their chosen objects of
  study) vs. eloquent bullshitters (i.e. people who have one idea
  and dogmatically try to fit it to everything, and evangelically
  try to convince people that they're right. There are plenty of
  both inside and outside academia.
 
    imartin2k - 3 hours ago
    "eloquent bullshitters"Good term. "The Rise of the Eloquent
    Bullshitters" would have been a nicer headline.
 
    tpeo - 2 hours ago
    If the author wanted to pin something on the rich, I think he
    should've gone explicitly after think tanks instead. I don't
    think your run-of-the-mill celebrity intellectual living off
    book royalties, paid talks and columns has that much to do with
    large political donors. All a paid speaker needs is a paying
    audience, and preferably a large one. And if he's a bullshiter,
    that's all the better: bullshit sells. They just seem target
    anyone with some disposable income instead. But think tanks
    need budgets (different order of magnitude here), and their
    output is used to supply media and lobbyists with stuff which
    might budge the decision of voters as well as politicians.Also,
    I disagree that this is "The Rise" of anything in either case.
    Think tanks are recent, but they've been here for a while. But
    someone peddling some (seemingly?) shallow understanding of the
    world for money is probably old as the hills. Certainly older
    than the sophists, older than Mesmer and his animal magnetism,
    as well as older than any sort of quackery or intellectual
    sleight of hand in historical memory.Talking about this as if
    it were something new, and with allusions to Gramsci to top it
    off, just strikes me as making it as unnecessarily ominous.
 
bitwize - 3 hours ago
I once read an article headlined something like "It's Clay Shirky's
internet and we just live in it". I thought to myself, who the fuck
is Clay Shirky and who decided it was his internet? Is he besties
with Vint Cerf or something?I really have nothing against Mr.
Shirky or his writing; some of his ideas sound interesting. But
this is nothing new. People privilege some people's opinions over
others not because they are the most qualified, but because they
happened to be around to say something profound sounding while a
New York Times (or New Yorker) columnist was listening.
 
rrggrr - 1 hours ago
Makes me think of Kevin Kelly (http://kk.org). His 1994 book Out of
Control, read retrospectively, has held up better than any other
prognostication I can think of concerning the nexus of business and
technology. Neal Stephenson's 1999 Cryptonomicon is another
staggering example. Asimov. Orwell. Machiavelli. Musashi. Tzu.
There are the 'A' players of thought leadership, and there is
everyone else.
 
  braneloop - 52 minutes ago
   A colleague and I just interviewed Kelly on his latest book "The
  Inevitable Understanding the 12 technological forces that will
  shape our future":https://dojo.nearsoft.com/episodes/technology-
  tools-kevin-ke...
 
BrooklynRage - 3 hours ago
@ProfJeffJarviss on twitter is a great parody of the thought
leaders. Would recommend following
(https://twitter.com/ProfJeffJarviss)
 
notadoc - 4 hours ago
"Thought Leader" and "Influencer" are terms that make me cringe.
Anytime I see those labels on someones bio, resume, twitter
profile, etc, I can't help but roll my eyes.
 
  ygaf - 3 hours ago
  If "thought leader" is on their resume, they better have a ted
  talk or something under their belt. I cringe at "influencer"
  because it's so plainly evil, and influencing is just "marketing"
  of ideas.
 
  kyleschiller - 4 hours ago
  In my experience, Influencers at least have some kind of mass
  social media following they can use for marketing, Thought
  Leaders tend to lack even that.
 
  mpclark - 3 hours ago
  They are terms that one can't apply to oneself. It's fine for
  other people to call me a thought leader, but I can't say it
  myself. I suspect this may also apply to "entrepreneur".
 
    Hydraulix989 - 25 minutes ago
    I can't believe people downvoted you for talking about yourself
    in a manner that could be considered arrogant except they
    didn't realize you were actually just being hypothetical.
 
projectramo - 5 hours ago
Is there a proposal to distinguish between a "thought leader" and a
"public intellectual" beyond feeling that one is superficial and
vapid, while the other is deep and interesting?The problem is that
"superficial" and "deep" are just metaphors, and boring or
interesting is subjective.
 
  emodendroket - 3 hours ago
  Subjectivity exists, but surely you aren't going to claim we
  can't make any distinction whatever that most reasonable people
  would accept between superficial and deep consideration of
  something.
 
  frgtpsswrdlame - 5 hours ago
  Drezner's proposal is that "thought leaders" are narrow but deep,
  usually evangelizing one big idea as the solution to our problems
  and that public intellectuals are broad and that their role is in
  pulling apart and critiquing the big ideas of thought leaders. As
  I understand it he believes that big money is putting their thumb
  on the scale so that we've lost our balance between the two. Lots
  of bad big ideas floating around with not enough discourse about
  why they are bad.
 
    sharemywin - 3 hours ago
    There's good and bad to most ideas that apply sometimes and not
    in others. "The exception that proves the rule"  I didn't know
    there were other reasons to mine coal than just energy. Should
    we not mine coal for those purposes? Solar panels aren't
    disposed of properly usually. Should we not use those?  The
    discussion is Coal bad. Solar good. Not well we need some coal
    for steel production.Global steel production is dependent on
    coal. 70% of the steel produced today uses coal. Metallurgical
    coal ? or coking coal ? is a vital ingredient in the steel
    making process. World crude steel production was 1.6 billion
    tonnes in 2013.
 
      [deleted]
 
  mabub24 - 4 hours ago
  I think one distinction we should try to make is that a "public
  intellectual" is someone who actively seeks to relate
  academic/scholarly research and methods to the public in
  accessible, but not simplified, terms and is open to serious
  debate. A "thought leader" tends to be associated with little
  scholarly rigour, a tendency to skirt debate, and over-
  simplification of complex ideas.I think the author did have a
  good distinction as well. A "public intellectual" questions and
  interrogates, while a "thought leader" seems to inordinately
  promote and prophesize.  (I'm thinking of someone like Ray
  Kurzweil as a "thought leader" here) That's not perfect, but it
  seems to serve pretty well.
 
    sharemywin - 3 hours ago
    How are they getting paid a shit professors paycheck or a big
    fat sponsor check? That's how I would distinguish. Maybe not
    always right but pretty darn close.
 
megamindbrian - 3 hours ago
thinkfluencing.
 
  tpeo - 2 hours ago
  Terrible. I love it!
 
[deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
CryoLogic - 4 hours ago
Thought Leader is just another way of saying "Some guy who wants to
sell you something"EDIT: In most cases
 
  radicalbyte - 3 hours ago
  The official term is "bovine scatologist".
 
jonbarker - 56 minutes ago
There exists a need for a niche un-Ted, one without music and tidy
closing remarks.
 
remotehack - 3 hours ago
It sounds like someone is trying to sell something.
 
abakker - 5 hours ago
Thew criticisms leveled at the Thought Leadership industry are
valid, I think. I am much more skeptical that blogs, magazines, and
small publications are the solution, or even a solution to this
problem.Gone unmentioned is the massive technical change in
communication, and its effect on the actual way in which humans
absorb and communicate ideas. I would look to the process of "going
viral" as a literal embodiment of the problem. Things which are
easily transmissible can achieve that critical mass to self-
sustain. The Thought Leadership industry recognizes and exploits
it, while the countermanding vaccine of rationality, criticality,
and analysis is much harder to pass on.
 
  muninn_ - 5 hours ago
  I shudder at reading the phrase "Thought Leadership industry". It
  is largely manufactured, consensus-oriented opinions by people
  that happened to get popular for one reason or another and most
  likely don't really know exactly what they're talking about aside
  from some popular slogans, terms, or arguments already having
  been made. It's really quite anti-intellectual, yet at the same
  time ivory-tower.
 
    abakker - 4 hours ago
    Infographics, Advertorials, and TEDx talks, brought to you by
    Thought Leadership of America Foundation for Progress, the
    Center for Media Excellence and the nam-shub of Enki. /s
 
tmaly - 3 hours ago
While some may shun Ayn Rand for her raw view of capitalism, if you
read Atlas Shrugged, she does do a good job of calling out this
"arcane unintelligibility"
 
  sharemywin - 3 hours ago
  title says it all:http://knowledgenuts.com/2013/09/20/ayn-rand-
  was-a-secret-we...
 
    infoworm - 2 hours ago
    You mean she used a system she had paid into?How is this not
    merely a personal attack?