GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
MIT's gas-powered drone is able to stay in the air for five days at
a time
123 points by janober
https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/27/mits-gas-powered-drone-is-able...
___________________________________________________________________
 
pj_mukh - 1 hours ago
Confused. There seem to be plenty of drones that can stay up there
for 120 hours or so [1]. Presumably, their solar additions should
be able to do even more?[1]: http://www.airforce-
technology.com/features/featurethe-top-1...
 
  pdelbarba - 58 minutes ago
  Precisely.  This is an incredibly easy problem to solve.  See all
  the Rutan projects, the model plane that crossed the atlantic,
  etc; most from over a decade or more ago.They claim that solar
  efficiency is not there yet, but look at the NASA Helios.  Yes,
  it's large, but such is life if you want solar.  The math behind
  it is incredibly simple.Yet, as usual, HN is foaming at the mouth
  because it has the word drone in the title.Edit: this is just
  another MIT fluff piece.  Watch the video, it's a carbon fiber
  tube filled with random COTS hobby grade components.  With a hot
  wire and some composites knowledge you could make this in your
  garage.
 
    lochieferrier - 50 minutes ago
    NASA Helios was quite expensive and tricky to build, with not a
    lot of margin left for useful payload.There's a weight runaway
    that occurs with solar powered aircraft, look at Fig 12 in this
    report:
    http://hoburg.mit.edu/publications/gassolar.pdfDisclaimer: I
    worked on this project, so am super biased.
 
      pdelbarba - 44 minutes ago
      I'm aware, I agree that solar aircraft is not an easy
      technology.  I'm mostly pointing out how inane this gasoline
      drone project is when there are real problems to solve.  To
      put it in perspective, the Helios project was 18 years ago
      and the Solar Impulse project improved upon the tech
      significantly.Edit: just got a chance to look at the report.
      Thanks for the link, there are some really interesting
      findings in there.
 
jmelloy - 1 hours ago
So when asked to build a solar-powered airplane, they ... built a
gas-powered one?
 
  techonup - 16 minutes ago
  This was actually modeled! See here:
  https://github.com/hoburg/gas_solar_trade
 
  randyrand - 1 hours ago
  Correct.
 
jacquesm - 30 minutes ago
There is no way a gas powered drone will help bring internet access
to some remote area.Why do these press releases always include the
most farfetched goals?
 
balozi - 1 hours ago
I guess that when the vehicle isn't helping deliver communications
to areas impacted by natural disasters or other emergencies, the
Air Force will strap an AGM-114 Hellfire package on it and have it
linger over combat zones for days.I hope these college kids are
bright enough to recognize  that they are building killing machines
unlike anything warfare has seen before.
 
  drdaeman - 1 hours ago
  It would be probably AGM-176 Griffin, not AGM-114. If the drone
  would be able to lift even those.Hellfires are relatively light,
  but I believe they're way too heavy - they're about twice the
  drone's own weight.I'm kind of skeptical about military use,
  except for possible reconnaissance.
 
  pizza - 1 hours ago
  Related: Network of Concerned Geographers, geographers who are
  against the use of their research to increase military force
  https://actionnetwork.org/petitions/network-of-concerned-geo...
 
  pulse7 - 1 hours ago
  The one who will build high-capacity, low-weight batteries will
  also build "super" killing and "super" spying machines...
 
    anotheryou - 1 hours ago
    You could rule out things by licensing.
 
      TallGuyShort - 1 hours ago
      Except for their pretty good track record of doing things
      off-books when it suits them and keeping it out of a
      courtroom.
 
        anotheryou - 57 minutes ago
        It's still a shame neither open-source nor inversities do
        it. Even if it's just idealistic.
 
      theWatcher37 - 1 hours ago
      Lol, good luck holding off the US military
 
  stale2002 - 1 hours ago
  Down with flying!The cult of ground knows that a pious individual
  stands on 2 feet.
 
    lvspiff - 1 hours ago
    2 legs good 4 propellers bad?
 
projectramo - 2 hours ago
At first I thought the kicker was going to be: the gas is helium,
it just floats.And then I thought: why is that a joke? Could you
save fuel keeping it aloft with a lighter than air gas and just use
the fuel to move it around?
 
  enraged_camel - 1 hours ago
  Think about how much weight a party balloon with helium can
  support. Not a lot. It could definitely not carry a camera, for
  example.Hot air balloons adjust altitude by heating the helium
  inside the balloon and letting it cool back down as appropriate.
  You would need a similar mechanism, but in much smaller format.
 
    snewk - 1 hours ago
    hot air balloons use hot air (which is less dense than cool
    air) not helium.they are open by design, unlike dirigibles. hot
    air balloons increase altitude by adding more hot air via a
    burner, and decrease altitude by letting the air diffuse out
    through holes in the top of the balloon.
 
      enraged_camel - 14 minutes ago
      Whoops, yeah you are right. I blame lack of caffeine!
 
    [deleted]
 
  okreallywtf - 2 hours ago
  I thought of that the other day, wondering how well you could
  possibly control a hot air balloon (or helium) based drone. My
  guess is wind forces etc would be extremely difficult to deal
  with
 
  PatentTroll - 2 hours ago
  I think you just invented the dirigible?
 
    projectramo - 2 hours ago
    Ha, yes.I guess another way to phrase the question would be:
    why don't they use dirigibles to solve extended air time
    problems?
 
      exhilaration - 1 hours ago
      The U.S. military is way ahead of you, they've been used for
      extended surveillance in war zones since 2004:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/13/world/asia/in-
      afghanistan-... and even domestically:
      https://theintercept.com/2017/04/24/nsa-blimp-spied-in-
      the-u...And before that, I believe surveillance blimps have
      been used in some form or another since the 19th century.
 
      jianshen - 2 hours ago
      I wondered why this wasn't applied to suitcases to make them
      lighter and then common sense kicked in regarding just how
      much actual helium would be required to lift even an empty
      suitcase...
 
        teraflop - 1 hours ago
        It's not even an issue of how much helium is needed; no
        amount of helium will make a typical suitcase
        buoyant.Filling it with helium at ambient pressure wouldn't
        produce nearly enough lift, and increasing the pressure
        would make it heavier, not lighter. What's needed is not
        mass, but volume.
 
      tpeo - 1 hours ago
      They are used to solve extended air time. That's what a
      weather balloon is.If what's bugging you is why lighter-than-
      air vehicles aren't used for commercial transportation,
      that's an entirely different issue.
 
        komali2 - 1 hours ago
        That does bug me actually. I want a Jules Verne-esque air-
        cruise-ship tour round the world.
 
          ferongr - 45 minutes ago
          Jules Verne was an advocate of heavier-than-air flying
          machines though.
 
          komali2 - 38 minutes ago
          Ok well leave out the man himself and include instead the
          brass-covered super-geared world he created.I want a
          steampunk blimp ok? There. You made me say it.
 
        zeropoint46 - 1 hours ago
        weather balloons are typically not up for that long, 90 or
        so minutes on average. So I don't think that's solving the
        extended air time. In fact they are pretty much designed to
        go up and pop and come back down. Lighter than air in
        general can be used to solve extended air time, and we're
        back to dirigibles, not weather balloons.
 
          tpeo - 59 minutes ago
          Well, I'm disappointed that the majority of their flights
          are this short. I thought there were some of them which
          were permanent atmospheric weather stations.But short
          flight times don't really have to be the case, because it
          seems that they can fly for extended periods of time: one
          of NASA's balloons stayed up for 46 days [0]. The US air
          force also uses balloons as surveillance stations, though
          I don't know the actual flight time of these [1][2].
          JLENS was supposed to stay up for 30 days at a time.[0]:
          https://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/supertiger-
          record....[1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tethered_Aer
          ostat_Radar_System[2]:
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JLENS
 
          zeropoint46 - 45 minutes ago
          sure but these aren't really weather balloons. the last
          two are basically tethered dirigibles. the first one is
          the closest and it's more like what project loon is
          doing. Yes, it's true, balloons can stay up for long
          periods of time, but this is not how weather balloons are
          made or what they are designed for. Weather balloons are
          designed to pop at a specific pressure and fall. As the
          balloon rises, the volume of gas expands due to there
          being less atmospheric pressure. At a point the balloon
          pops and it falls back to earth. The loon and the balloon
          in your first link probably use a system that adjusts the
          pressure in the balloon by compressing it into a storage
          container. This allows it to "hold" an altitude and keep
          the balloon from ascending until it bursts. Also, at
          least in loon's case, it uses a different material than a
          standard weather balloon. This probably also plays a roll
          in it's expandability, resistance to long term UV and
          keeping itself from popping.
 
          NickSharp - 1 hours ago
          Project Loon seems to be doing fine.  They're using
          balloons to keep equipment aloft for months at a time.
 
          zeropoint46 - 1 hours ago
          sure, but I wouldn't exactly call that a weather balloon.
 
      mikeash - 2 hours ago
      Dirigibles require huge volumes, because the lifting power of
      gas is small. Those huge volumes make for a relatively weak,
      slow, and difficult-to-maneuver craft. A big reason why
      airships disappeared in favor of airplanes was that airships
      had a really tough time handling or avoiding bad weather
      because of these limitations.
 
        acchow - 1 hours ago
        I assume huge volumes are also easily detectible?
 
        jp555 - 1 hours ago
        I have a blurry recollection of seeing an aircraft design
        that was a combination of an airplane and a dirigible. It
        looked like a poofy manta ray,  an inflated rigid lifting
        body or flying wing. It wasn't quite VTOL & needed a very
        short runway, but it also gained more maneuverability in
        flight. Maybe it was too much of a compromise though.
 
          theophrastus - 32 minutes ago
          Perhaps you're thinking of the infamous 'Deltoid
          Pumpkinseed'[1][2] ?[1]
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AEREON_26[2]
          https://www.amazon.com/Deltoid-Pumpkin-Seed-John-
          McPhee/dp/0...
 
          cr0sh - 8 minutes ago
          You mean this one?http://mashable.com/2017/05/24
          /airlander-butt-plane-successf...There's actually been
          more than one of these types of aircraft (known as
          Lighter Than Air - or LTA Aircraft), either as an idea or
          prototype throughout history.
 
          astebbin - 5 minutes ago
          Could it be this one [0], or its predecessor [1]?[0]
          http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lockheed-martin-
          aircra... [1]
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_P-791
 
  skybrian - 48 minutes ago
  Balloons work well if you're travelling with the wind. It's a lot
  of drag if you're fighting the wind.But suppose you change
  altitude to find favorable winds? That's what Project Loon is
  doing: https://x.company/loon/
 
  faragon - 1 hours ago
  That was my thought, too. E.g. a zeppelin-like drone could fly
  forever.
 
    seanp2k2 - 53 minutes ago
    Heat the air with direct solar to give it lift. Make it clear
    on the outside and have something black on the inside to absorb
    more heat. For bonus points, let it be deployable during
    flight...fly drone into position in plane mode, pop the blimp,
    inflating it with air from the forward travel inertia, heat it
    once with a small rocket motor or something, then let the sun
    keep it hot enough to float. When done, eject the balloon and
    fly back. I'm sure there are lots of details around why they
    don't do this.
 
      cr0sh - 2 minutes ago
      There used to be (maybe still is?) a toy, sold by Edmund
      Scientific and others - that was basically a thin black and
      big dry cleaning bag. You'd basically take it outside on a
      sunny day, whip it around a bit to "fill" it with some air,
      tie it closed, and then let it heat up in the sun.
      Eventually, it would take shape, becoming buoyant, at which
      point you could let it go to float off (presumably tied down
      with a string if you wanted to keep it).I don't know if it is
      still available or not, or whether anyone ever added remote
      controls to it...Hmm - apparently it or something similar is
      still available - or you can try to build one
      yourself:http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-Solar-Heated-
      Balloon/
 
dougmany - 1 hours ago
Curious how they used gpkit for the design, I found this:
http://gpkit.readthedocs.io/en/latest/examples.html#simple-w...
 
  lochieferrier - 47 minutes ago
  Code is here: https://github.com/hoburg/jho
 
PatentTroll - 2 hours ago
I remember when we used to call them model airplanes.
 
  prestonbriggs - 1 hours ago
  Reminds me of
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Spirit_of_Butts%27_Farm
 
  csours - 1 hours ago
  Yea, but this model airplane is bigger than a car (looks like 3x
  wider at least)
 
  blhack - 1 hours ago
  Honestly I'm just happy at the renewed interest in these things.
 
  agumonkey - 1 hours ago
  works on wifi not UHF too
 
    zyxzkz - 1 hours ago
    As long as the inventor gets to DRINK FROM THE FIREHOSE!
 
arikr - 1 hours ago
Does anyone know where the US Airforce posted the challenge?Is
there a good repo for all of the US Govts challenges/requests (e.g.
DARPA ones + others like USAF?)
 
[deleted]
 
rdiddly - 1 hours ago
Well they inadvertently proved once again just how energy-dense and
how incredibly ridiculously efficient liquid petroleum fuels are
and what a boon and a curse they've been to humanity during this
brief one-or-two-century blip, and how difficult it will be to
replace them with anything that could even come close to current
levels of energy output/consumption.(That's a problem statement,
not an ad.)
 
  mschuster91 - 15 minutes ago
  You can always synthesize gas (or use hydrogen as replacement, if
  your system can deal with the associated problems). Liquid
  fossil-based stuff is where the problem lies.
 
faragon - 1 hours ago
The future: ultra-light drones with 90% of its weight being
batteries of charging during day time, so they can be operative at
night. Flying 24/7, forever (e.g. zeppelin-like).
 
jobu - 2 hours ago
That's neat, but not very revolutionary.  The Rutan Voyager flew
for 9 days (around the world) without refueling back in the 80s -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutan_Voyager
 
  reality_hacker - 1 hours ago
  These are two completely different things: Rutan max weight was
  10,000 pounds, and this one is 150 pounds..
 
  wyldfire - 2 hours ago
  That craft had two pilots onboard, this one had a single remote
  pilot.  It's a real challenge to design a small craft that
  maximizes payload and minimizes fuel consumption along with
  scores of other constraints.Voyager also needed a long runway for
  launch and probably costs vastly more than this drone.  Its use
  case as an emergency communication device is revolutionary.
 
    Camillo - 1 hours ago
    It seems that not having to have pilots onboard would make
    things easier, though.
 
  mikeash - 2 hours ago
  ZPG-2 did 11.5 days back in 1957. Maybe consider more than just
  the raw duration number?
 
    Dylan16807 - 4 minutes ago
    They are considering more than raw duration.  That's why
    they're comparing a prop plane to a prop plane.
 
andybak - 1 hours ago
Gas in the American colloquial sense? Or actual gas?
 
  rdiddly - 1 hours ago
  petrol
 
  randyrand - 1 hours ago
  It's in the article!