GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Cooling the tube - Engineering heat out of the Underground
194 points by mzehrer
https://www.ianvisits.co.uk/blog/2017/06/10/cooling-the-tube-eng...
___________________________________________________________________
 
eecc - 6 hours ago
For one thing I'm surprised they're not using regenerative brakes.
It sure will cost some of the profit but refurbishing the trains
with these will cut somewhat on that 80% of heat
 
  k-mcgrady - 5 hours ago
  >> It sure will cost some of the profitAll profits are re-
  invested with TFL so I don't think cost (within reason) would be
  a major concern.
 
  FatalLogic - 5 hours ago
  They are already using regenerative braking extensively,
  according to this
  articlehttps://www.ianvisits.co.uk/blog/2017/06/10/cooling-the-
  tube...
 
  lucaspiller - 4 hours ago
  > It sure will cost some of the profitTfL isn't a private
  organisation, they are a government body. In 2015/16 only half of
  their costs were covered by ticket sales and other income
  (advertising, sponsorships, etc). The rest comes from government
  funding, so taxes.
 
    Brakenshire - 1 hours ago
    That's actually mostly not true any more. By next year day to
    day costs will be 100% self-funded, only capital investment
    will be funded by the state.http://www.mayorwatch.co.uk/govt-
    funding-changes-will-force-...
 
franciscop - 53 minutes ago
The Tokyo (and Japan in general) underground/subway is actually
quite fresh and amazing in the hot summer. How do they do it? It
might be interesting to learn from them and a good question for the
Underground of London Engineers.
 
amoorthy - 2 hours ago
Interesting article. However I can't recall tube stations being
much warmer than outside temperatures in winter (on non-windy
days). If that's right then how is the heat dissipated better in
winter?I don't live in London so anyone with regular riding
experience please correct me if I'm wrong.
 
  askvictor - 1 hours ago
  When I was there it was definitely warmer than outside in winter.
  Don't live there either mind you.
 
  an_account - 1 hours ago
  I was wondering that too. If they clay is able to cool off and
  "reset" in winter then the real story is just that these lines
  see more use today.
 
    robotresearcher - 1 hours ago
    The tube is warm in winter. It would be nice except you are
    typically wearing a winter coat so it's hard to get it just
    right.
 
memracom - 43 minutes ago
Here is an idea that I sent to the Underground in 2006 when they
solicited suggestions from the public.Add cool to the tunnels,
rather than taking heat out.Build liquid air plants above ground, 2
or 3 floors up in the air so that the heat of the pumps is released
above street level and the noise can be kept away from the street.
Feed the liquid air into the tube tunnels through insulated pipes
which takes up far less volume than air vents. Let gravity bring
the liquid air down the pipes. Release the liquid into the tunnels
near platforms where the air pump effect of moving trains caused
lots of air circulation. Also the car doors open on the
platforms.Since you are liquifying the air, not just the oxygen, it
can be safely released anywhere in the tunnels. And if your air
intakes are high up you will actually be improving the air quality
in the tunnels as well, i.e. cleaner air flows in.
 
  yev - 25 minutes ago
  For those who also didn't know about liquid air: "Liquid air is
  air that has been cooled to very low temperatures (cryogenic
  temperatures), so that it has condensed into a pale blue mobile
  liquid. To protect it from room temperature, it must be kept in a
  vacuum insulated flask." (c) WikiPlan sounds great and very
  expensive.
 
ziikutv - 3 hours ago
Silly question, is the heat so low that it cannot be used for
something other than releasing above ground?
 
scotthtaylor - 5 hours ago
Elon Musk could probably come up with an answer to this whilst he
was out walking the dog :)
 
kator - 5 hours ago
Subways in NYC are not fun in the summer either.  I always assumed
it was because when they were designed they didn't consider a
future state where air conditioners on the trains dump their heat
into the tunnel.I tried searching for a similar study for NYC but
all I found was old articles from years back.It doesn't look like
the MTA shares any measurements of temperature in their data feeds:
http://web.mta.info/developers/download.htmlDoes anyone have ideas
on how we could get this sort of data for NYC subways?
 
  ice109 - 26 minutes ago
  there is no way that the NYC Subway's AC's dumping heat into the
  tunnels contributes in any meaningful way to the temperature
  inside the stations - the tunnel system is enormous relative to
  the trains. much more it's simply NYC summers are sweltering and
  the stations aren't well ventilated at all.
 
    CydeWeys - 23 minutes ago
    Did you read the linked article?  The heat of the London
    Underground tube tunnels is directly caused by heat released by
    trains (though primarily from brakes and friction, not AC), and
    has nothing to do with season.  It's swelteringly hot down
    there in winter.I don't see why it'd be any different for NYC,
    where I live.
 
  [deleted]
 
tomohawk - 21 minutes ago
I wonder if using a different means of regenerative breaking would
work, such as hydraulic
hybrid.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_hybrid_vehicleMuch
more of the power would be preserved, leading to less heat.
 
mixedmath - 2 hours ago
I wonder, how long would they need to shut down the tube before
temperatures lowered?
 
  BillinghamJ - 50 minutes ago
  Years, possibly even decades. The problem is that the clay just
  doesn?t really release the heat - it?s very good at retaining it.
 
iamflimflam1 - 7 hours ago
More information available from the article's source:
https://www.ianvisits.co.uk/blog/2017/06/10/cooling-the-tube...
 
  pasbesoin - 6 hours ago
  This is a much better and more thorough read.
 
  OJFord - 3 hours ago
  This is the much better article for this audience. The submitted
  article is an expansion of tweets summarising this one.
 
  hengheng - 4 hours ago
  These are the first trains that I hear of with no regenerative
  braking.
 
    mschuster91 - 2 hours ago
    The first generation of Munich subway trains (manufactured from
    1967-1983) uses resistor banks for braking, so the energy from
    braking goes right into heat.Only the later generation B and
    the new C generation can move brake energy back into the grid.
 
    mrec - 4 hours ago
    > indeed, the use of regenerative braking now converts about
    half the heat loss back into electricity. However, that can
    only work where trains are accelerating and braking at the same
    time, on the same electricity sub-station loop.Besides that,
    Tube tracks often rise slightly at stations, so that trains get
    a small gravity assist to both stopping and starting off again.
    (Unfortunately it also means that hot air from the tunnels
    tends to collect there, but you can't win 'em all.)
 
      flai - 4 hours ago
      That is a pretty cool way to implement regenerative breaking
      that I honestly never thought of (even though the tram in my
      hometown feeds energy in the grid when driving downwards)
 
    crote - 4 hours ago
    Correct me if i'm wrong, but it seems that regenerative braking
    is a bit troublesome because it is a third rail direct current
    system: a "regular" AC system can simply feed power back
    through the transformers to the power grid, but this is not
    possible here, so power must be consumed by another train fed
    by the same rectifier.
 
      mhb - 2 hours ago
      You're not wrong:  However, that [regeneraative braking] can
      only work where trains are accelerating and braking at the
      same time, on the same electricity sub-station loop.
 
      hydrogen18 - 4 hours ago
      It would be much more difficult to feed power back into an AC
      grid from a regenerative brake. With a DC grid, no
      synchronization is needed.
 
        F_r_k - 3 hours ago
        That's not true.1) modern railway is fully IGBT powered. In
        this case it is trivial to inject current.2) with DC
        current you need a substation capable of converting AC to
        DC (easy: bridge rectifier) but also DC to AC (to given
        tolerances) which is much more cumbersome.
 
  [deleted]
 
Jyaif - 4 hours ago
The Montreal subway system has a very clever way of somewhat saving
energy (and emitting less heat): the section of the track at the
station stop is higher than the rest of the track. This means that
the train's kinetic energy is converted to/from potential energy
whenever the train arrives/leaves the station stops.
 
  ant6n - 1 hours ago
  I feel like in the long term, this may become a liability
  compared to regenerative braking and level tracks.For example the
  Montreal metro currently only allows a train to leave a station
  when the platform of the next one is free, limiting the frequency
  of this very crowded system. With modern signaling, trains can
  creep up to the ones before them and reduce the time between them
  down to 40 seconds - but it's more difficult with all those
  slopes around.It's also making extending platform lengths or
  moving/adding stations nearly impossible.
 
  cnorthwood - 4 hours ago
  The Tube does similar, with uphill approaches to stations and
  downhill departures.
 
    agumonkey - 4 hours ago
    I was wondering if this was used, especially for cars.
 
f_allwein - 6 hours ago
Related: tube map showing temperatures
http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2017/05/its-official-the-bakerloo-i...
 
  kevin_thibedeau - 2 hours ago
  So two lines just barely break 30C for a couple months in the
  year. Not exactly a crisis.
 
    estel - 2 hours ago
    I believe those are temperatures in the actual tunnels, a
    passenger's experience in a crowded tube car will be quite a
    bit warmer!
 
      bb611 - 1 hours ago
      Underground cars don't have AC/heat? At least in the US those
      are ubiquitous on subways
 
        poooogles - 1 hours ago
        The deep level lines don't no. Only the sub surface cut and
        cover style lines.
 
        matthewmacleod - 1 hours ago
        The deep level London tube lines would be difficult to fit
        AC units to given the small size and tight tolerances.Newer
        units on the subsurface lines do have AC fitted.
 
    poooogles - 1 hours ago
    In the cars it gets hotter [1], the humidity is what makes it
    worse.1. http://londonist.com/2015/07/itd-be-illegal-to-
    transport-cat...
 
Roritharr - 6 hours ago
What is so "experimental" about the air coolers in the picture?
They look like normal A/Cs
 
  pjc50 - 6 hours ago
  The tube did not have powered A/C until fairly recently - it was
  built with ambient air ventilation only.
 
    avianlyric - 6 hours ago
    And that A/C is only on cut and cover lines (circle etc) not
    deep level trains.On deep level trains there is no good place
    for the trains to dump the heat.
 
    [deleted]
 
  stan_rogers - 6 hours ago
  It's not so much that the coolers are experimental, but what
  they're doing with them is an experiment.
 
  Symbiote - 6 hours ago
  Normal air conditioners produce a lot of heat, which is usually
  ventilated outside. That's more difficult to achieve deep
  underground.According to Wikipedia, it's a groundwater based
  cooling
  system.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_cooling
 
ricw - 2 hours ago
I never got why the heat in the tube was not being used as a heat
source. You could extract the heat and supply it to surrounding
buildings at a cost, thereby cooling the tube. The tech is readily
available. It would be a win win situation. Plus it'd be be very
environmentally friendly.
 
  CydeWeys - 19 minutes ago
  The problem is that the heat isn't a point source, it's diffused
  across hundreds of kilometers of tunnel.  The amount of
  infrastructure you'd have to build to extract it at scale would
  simply cost way too much.  It's cheaper for any reasonable
  timeframe to simply continue burning natural gas at the surface
  for heat than to invest all of this into infrastructure at a very
  long-term ROI.
 
  adekok - 2 hours ago
  If they don't have room available to get cool air/water down to
  the tube, they don't have room available to get hot air/water up,
  either.
 
Tharkun - 2 hours ago
How much heat are we talking about? I'm guessing it wouldn't be
enough to use for district heating, the way some industrial waste
heat is converted to hot water for homes?
 
  manmal - 1 hours ago
  The original source [1] has a graphic at the bottom where it says
  about 300m kWh per year currently, so about 34MW on average if I
  didn't miscalculate.1:
  https://www.ianvisits.co.uk/blog/2017/06/10/cooling-the-tube...
 
f_allwein - 6 hours ago
> offered a prize of ?100,000 to anyone who could come up with
fresh ideasToo late now, but I wonder if they considered district
cooling, where e.g. cold water from rivers is used as an
alternative to air conditioning. Seems to be used successfully in
my hometown of Munich:
https://www.swm.de/english/m-fernwaerme/m-fernkaelte.html
 
  avianlyric - 6 hours ago
  They have used water cooling from rivers in some stations (I
  can't find the source, but I think it was a previous ianvisits
  post).Unfortunately only a couple of stations have an appropriate
  water supply, and enough free vertical shaft space to fit the
  pipes.
 
    twic - 2 hours ago
    There are some details on that in the Ian Visits article linked
    to in another comment.There was also this, from 1938, although
    i don't know where they got the water:https://en.wikipedia.org/
    wiki/Tottenham_Court_Road_chiller
 
    inetknght - 8 minutes ago
    The article even mentions it!> Elsewhere, they?ve been using
    cool ground water to cool some of the stations. An experiment
    at Victoria station was the first, as water from the River
    Tyburn was used to cool the air in the station. This was only
    an experiment, but at Green Park, a permanent version was
    installed in 2012.
 
  bb611 - 1 hours ago
  From the article in the top comment :> Elsewhere, they?ve been
  using cool ground water to cool some of the stations. An
  experiment at Victoria station was the first, as water from the
  River Tyburn was used to cool the air in the station. This was
  only an experiment, but at Green Park, a permanent version was
  installed in 2012.
 
  tonfa - 6 hours ago
  > Nobody could think of anything TfL wasn?t already trying, and
  the prize went unclaimed.I'd assume they did, especially if it's
  something that's done elsewhere.
 
avar - 4 hours ago
I don't understand why lack of space above ground is a hindrance to
building new ventilation shafts. Surely these aren't going to be
wider than a sidewalk, and in central London the distance between
any two roads on a block is rarely more than 50-100 meters.You'd
end up with lots of ventilation grates on the sidewalks on the
surface, but that seems like an easy and space efficient solution.
 
  eponeponepon - 4 hours ago
  A substantial part of the problem is the sheer age of central
  London; people have been digging beneath it and piling more
  buildings on top of it for nearly 2000 years, so given any
  particular spot in the Tube network, there's every chance that if
  you try and drill upward from it, you'll hit part of the sewer
  system, a buried river, someone's wine cellar, something top-
  secret belonging to the state, a lost graveyard, a plague-pit...
 
l5870uoo9y - 4 hours ago
Is the temperature still rising or have it plateaued?
 
  rwmj - 2 hours ago
  And how long is it "stored" in the ground?  If they closed the
  tube for a week (I know) would the earth return to 14C?
 
    TheOtherHobbes - 1 hours ago
    No. I doubt anything less than a decade would make much of a
    difference.It's taken a century or so to raise the temperature
    in the tunnels by around ten degrees C. That already includes
    the cooling effect of cold air being pushed into the tunnels
    for most of the year, balanced by the relatively small number
    of days a year when the air temp in London is more than
    14C.Without that cooling heat has nowhere much to go. It will
    radiate out into the air, which will make its way up and out
    rather slowly. And it will diffuse into the clay/soil around
    the tunnels, even more slowly.A fully passive cooling-off
    period would take years - at least.The problem isn't impossible
    to solve. All kinds of active cooling solutions are
    possible.The problem is that it's impossible to solve
    affordably. You effectively have to build a heat exchanger the
    size of central London, which is never going to be cheap.
 
raverbashing - 6 hours ago
How much would it cost to add regenerative braking to the cars?And
instead of ventilation shafts you would probably need active heat
pumps
 
  pjc50 - 6 hours ago
  Regenerative braking is already widespread, as mentioned in the
  article. Unfortunately some of the stock is very old.
 
  zkms - 6 hours ago
  Per https://www.ianvisits.co.uk/blog/2017/06/10/cooling-the-
  tube... there already is regenerative braking on some cars, the
  issue is that regenerative braking can't happen if there's no
  train on the same section of DC bus that can accept the power.
  There needs to be some sort of inverter to sink the higher DC
  voltage and send it back into the grid.
 
    Shivetya - 5 hours ago
    why not incorporate storage in the car and discharge it when
    launching from a stop. I am sure there has to be a little
    onboard storage but it appears they need more if they cannot
    discharge it. Isn't this ideal for ultra capacitors?it really
    reads like the cars must be changed to fix the problem as they
    are the heat source. so unless an economical means can be found
    to store/discharge it between stations their only solution is
    to cool the tube itself.So isolate the passenger area from the
    tube area at all stations and force cool air from points where
    you have easy access to cooling. the air flow would of course
    move in the direction of trains. can that work?
 
      Symbiote - 4 hours ago
      Adding stuff to trains ("cars"?) increases the weight, which
      means more energy is needed to move the thing. It also takes
      up space, which is very limited.Some storage system near a
      station (where there is more ventilation) could make sense,
      but probably costs more than the system mentioned in the
      IanVisits blog to return power to the city (i.e. convert the
      DC the trains use back to AC for the city).I don't think the
      isolation idea would work. Where does the air for people on
      trains to breath come from?
 
    robryk - 4 hours ago
    Or you can just convert that energy into heat, but do that on
    the surface. Have large resistor banks on the surface that you
    connect to the DC grid when the voltage is too high.
 
      raverbashing - 4 hours ago
      That would be acceptable 100 years ago. Not today
 
        robryk - 3 hours ago
        Why is moving the place one dumps heat from below ground to
        above ground not acceptable?
 
          raverbashing - 1 hours ago
          Because you can use it for something else other than
          heating, like, putting it back into the grid, storing
          (either battery, flywheel or supercapacitor).
 
        jrockway - 2 hours ago
        Why?  Stopping the trains wastes energy regardless of
        whether you dump the extra power into the wheels with
        friction brakes or into a resistor bank.  Dynamic brakes on
        diesel trains already sink the power into resistors.
 
      hydrogen18 - 3 hours ago
      That would work, but a large flywheel would also be a good
      solution. You could spin up the flywheel to store energy and
      if it reaches maximum speed then use the resistors. You'd
      also need to detect load on the grid and then run the
      flywheel system in reverse to assist vehicles that are
      moving.
 
        late2part - 54 minutes ago
        "run the flywheel system in reverse to assist vehicles that
        are moving"Just to be clear, you wouldn't actually run the
        flywheel in the opposite direction..  You'd take energy out
        of the flywheel versus putting it in?
 
          CydeWeys - 22 minutes ago
          Correct.
 
        CydeWeys - 21 minutes ago
        How about just batteries, or heck, large capacitor banks?
        How much energy is recovered from a single train braking
        anyway?
 
      MiguelHudnandez - 2 hours ago
      If you can run wires all the way to the surface, you can sink
      the power into the grid or traditional batteries.
 
      zkms - 1 hours ago
      You can do that, but you can also use it to power
      accelerating trains that live on every other track section /
      DC bus -- by inverting it back into AC and dumping that onto
      the AC grid that's used to supply your rectifiers.
 
toyg - 6 hours ago
>The future of the cooling the tube project will be judged not so
much by how they cool the hot tunnels, but by how they stop tunnels
becoming hot in the first place.That's a very good metaphor for our
planet.