GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-06-22) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Fake online stores reveal gamblers' shadow banking system
140 points by rbanffy
http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-gambling-usa-dummies-idUKKBN19D13E
dUKKBN19D13E
___________________________________________________________________
 
blowski - 6 hours ago
The linked article is also very
interestinghttp://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-consett-
companies-s...
 
weego - 4 hours ago
Only about a decade behind on covering this.
 
e40 - 4 hours ago
Still online: https://www.myfabricfactory.com/index.php
 
[deleted]
 
downandout - 2 hours ago
I noticed one of these payment processing fronts when I looked at
my card transactions after making a PartyPoker deposit back in
~2006.  In this case, it was a site called Gygon.com.  If you
visited their website, you would have thought it was an online lamp
store with many broken features.  I later learned that GYGON stood
for "get your game on".
 
michaelbuckbee - 6 hours ago
This sounds somewhat similar to the polite fiction of Japanese
Pachinko parlors [1]."Taniguchi swapped the tray of thousands of
winning silver balls for a receipt, which in turn was swappable for
alcohol, toys or other prizes. To get money, you need to ask for
the ?special prize? tokens. These are plastic gold-coloured tokens
that can be swapped for cash -- but not within the pachinko
parlour. Instead, they are cashed in at TUC shops that are always
located nearby and exist as a legal loophole enabling you to win
money in a country that technically forbids gambling."1 -
http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20120815-the-big-business-of...
 
  the_cat_kittles - 5 hours ago
  great travel story. it misses something that i felt in spades
  whenever i popped my head into a pachinko parlor: it is
  incredibly depressing. ive never seen slots in vegas but i
  imagine its similar. theres something incredibly reductive about
  sitting there watching balls bounce randomly and slowly losing
  money. especially knowing that people are hopelessly addicted to
  it. but, i get it. we are all capable of succumbing to things
  like this. the void is utterly palpable in those places.
 
    tdeck - 2 hours ago
    I was in Vegas once and can confirm it's incredibly depressing
    to walk through a casino. And they're mostly slots and slot
    zombies, unlike casinos in the movies.
 
    balabaster - 4 hours ago
    Wow, I've been in about a dozen casinos in my life. I hated
    every minute I was in them. I had pre-budgeted a specific
    amount and when it was gone, it was gone.I could never really
    place my finger on what it was I disliked about them except
    that the games bored me. But it was so much more than that. I
    failed to connect the dots until exactly the moment I read your
    comment.There is a void, an abyss of loneliness and sorrow.
    Many of the people there are empty. Lost. An air of depression,
    desperation hangs in the air. It's like they've lost the will
    to live and this is their last hope at redemption that fades
    with every token they drop into the machines.As an empath, this
    emptiness, this void that you describe being so palpable. That
    cuts to the very core of how it makes me feel when I enter them
    and why I spend the entire time longing for the door. It's like
    the Dementor's Kiss for me.Thank you! Sincerely!
 
      Jach - 24 minutes ago
      I've been in a few casinos over the last few years (I go with
      a friend just to have the existential experience, we have yet
      to play anything, but we then try out their buffet), what
      strikes me is how much and how little they have changed from
      what I remember from the few I've been to as a kid or seen in
      movies. The staple slot machines are still there, they take
      up most of the floor space, but they're the most depressing.
      They don't even have physical levers, it's all just
      repeatedly pressing a button. No coins, everything's on a
      card now. They all look pretty much the same. There were like
      20 different wolf-themed slots. The game variety is so small
      in terms of objectives and what you can control (or have the
      illusion of control anyway), the effects even when you win
      are so dull (many pinball games have a much more exciting
      "Multiball!" announcement) -- again no spitting out a bunch
      of coins -- how do people get addicted to that, especially
      when they're usually losing money? If people claim it's for
      fun and don't expect to win (as rationally they shouldn't
      against the house), why don't they just buy an actual game,
      or download any of the free ones, for a console, phone, or
      PC, and derive many more hours of entertainment for a much
      lower dollar investment? If people do it just to enable
      fantasies of striking it rich, why don't lotto tickets
      adequately fill that niche?Fortunately casino buffets are
      generally good enough that I can enjoy the food and put aside
      such thoughts.
 
      cm2012 - 4 hours ago
      My wife gets the same feeling as you. She's always really
      attuned to other people's emotions.
 
        balabaster - 4 hours ago
        It's a curse you can't walk away from sadly. I hope you
        treat that compassionately. Many people have no idea just
        how deeply that affects them. It's not just being attuned
        to other people's emotions so much as it affects your own
        emotions. Much of the time it clouds my own emotions so
        deeply, I find it impossible to untangle which are my own
        emotions and which are those of the people around me. I
        have to walk away and give myself time for respite. It can
        be really hard. I try and surround myself with happy,
        positive, optimistic people that make me laugh. Sometimes,
        that's literally the only way I can deal with it.It makes
        for a good counsellor, but I can't fix everyone's problems
        and I have to remind myself of that constantly.Everyone is
        responsible for their own feelings. I am responsible for my
        own.I have to remind myself of that numerous times every
        day or I spend all day feeling guilty for not fixing things
        for everyone.Their journey is not mine. My journey is not
        theirs. I can share their path, they can share mine, but I
        am not here to fix everything for everyone. All I can do is
        be there and show them how they can fix it for
        themselves.But now we're totally off-topic.
 
          cm2012 - 3 hours ago
          I read this to my wife, who said, "Are you me?" Thanks
          for that, she appreciates knowing she's not the only one
          like that. Stay well :)
 
      Frondo - 4 hours ago
      Oh, yes.You might like reading this book, Addiction by Design
      :http://www.powells.com/SearchResults?kw=title:addiction%20by
      ...It's about how much research and development has gone into
      making those machines as addictive as possible.  Also one of
      the most depressing books I've ever read.
 
        balabaster - 4 hours ago
        Great, just what I need, another thing to depress me
        :DActually, this sounds pretty fascinating. I will check it
        out.Thanks
 
      losteric - 3 hours ago
      Honestly, it just sounds like you don't like gambling and
      have created emotional preconceptions out of ignorance. What
      separates responsible video games from gambling?Addiction and
      using simple pleasures to fill the hole of depression is
      certainly a problem... however that issue transcends any
      individual pleasure. People can be addicted to TV, video
      games, political news, and even books.
 
        jimmaswell - 3 hours ago
        Yes, people can be addicted to anything, but that's a false
        equivalence. Debilitating addiction to video games is
        incredibly rare in comparison to gambling, and someone
        addicted to video games isn't normally going to lose their
        life's savings. We're comparing cigarettes and potato
        chips.Further, gambling is essentially a zero-sum game. The
        house always wins, equal to how much you lose, and pretty
        much every gambler loses besides the one or two rare
        examples who strike a jackpot the first time they ever play
        and then never gamble again. In contrast, buying a video
        game is a transactions both parties are normally expected
        to benefit from equally, and a video game's single player
        mode is expected to last at least 10 hours at a minimum
        nowadays not counting online play that lasts essentially as
        long as you want, while gambling machines need a constant
        input of money that adds up to much more over time. Even
        comparing to coin-based arcade machines, a session on one
        of those will last much longer for the price, and even in
        the microtransactions that have become common nowadays you
        at least end up with something more than the screen
        flashing some bright lights for a few seconds. So overall
        on this point, it seems to me like a gambling establishment
        is necessarily exploitative while a video game publisher
        isn't.
 
        omarchowdhury - 3 hours ago
        Yeah, sounds exactly like how some people on HN have
        described people at Walmart.
 
          AnimalMuppet - 2 hours ago
          It sounds like how an honest person might describe me on
          HN.
 
      csa - 4 hours ago
      Take 20x the min bet (e.g., $200 to a $10 table) to a craps
      table, bet the pass line, get free drinks, and cheer like
      crazy for the shooter.This is a relatively low variance and
      no skill way to have fun at a casino. The craps table are
      usually where the fun people are.A few general comments:-
      Your expected value on a $10 bet is -$0.15. You get maybe
      25-30 bets an hour at a full table. It's a very cheap game to
      play.- Tables are active at different times in different
      casinos. Evenings are often the best time. Weekends can be
      good, but sometimes more crowded and/or higher minimums.-
      Stakes can matter in some casinos. The difference of
      clientele at a $5 min table and a $10 min table can be
      noticeable. Casinos with a wider range of min bets will also
      have wider range of atmospheres. Pick your poison.- Remember
      that you are responsible for your bet and collecting your
      winnings (i.e., pulling it in). Dealers sometimes make
      mistakes, and sometimes people grab the wrong bet
      (intentionally or unintentionally). This is usually not an
      issue, just stay on top of it at a busy table.- Bring some $1
      or $5 chips to tip the dealers and the cocktail waitresses.
      Good tipping usually gets you better service.
 
        balabaster - 3 hours ago
        I know there are loads of people that do find enjoyment in
        Casinos. So I know my perspective isn't the only one by a
        long shot.A friend of mine used to be a professional
        gambler. He stuck to the poker tables... I guess he must've
        played medium stakes. He did pretty well because you're
        playing against the other players, so even though the house
        wins overall, if you're a decent poker player, you can walk
        away with more than you started every night, and he did and
        the house still wins. The odds work far more favourably
        when you're betting against other players rather than the
        house. He started off without much money in the bank, but
        he was pretty quickly pulling in enough to cover his rent,
        bills and never seemed to want for much.It always seemed to
        me if the game itself could've held my attention longer
        than 15 minutes, it would've been a pretty easy way to
        augment my income. The truth is though, after 15 minutes
        I'm bored with that.
 
          csa - 3 hours ago
          Yeah. Poker can definitely be +ev. However, as you
          mentioned, +ev poker is often not terribly interesting
          (depends on the game and the stakes).My reply was mainly
          just to point out that some casinos do have fun areas
          that are accessible with a relatively small budget with
          small expected losses in the long term.
 
          technofiend - 3 hours ago
          That's the great thing about poker; you don't have to be
          better than the house's odds which are fixed against you
          anyway: you only have to be better than the other
          players.  I used to regularly fund trips to Vegas playing
          small stakes tournaments against people who had watched
          one too many WSOP events on TV.  Then I'd lose or barely
          place in the money playing medium stakes tournaments with
          all the locals and the grinders.  It is possible to find
          your level and profit from playing those slightly below
          it.  But after a while it's indistinguishable from a 9-5
          job, so you really have to love it.
 
          valuearb - 2 hours ago
          it's really hard to win st poker, the take is high enough
          to make 95% of players bet losers.
 
          technofiend - 2 hours ago
          I did mention playing tournament poker where the entry
          costs are fixed although escalating blinds can force you
          to adopt different strategies based on your M.  I agree
          live is different but even then house take can vary
          greatly.
 
          laumars - 2 hours ago
          > if you're a decent poker player, you can walk away with
          more than you started every night,This is a huge
          exaggeration from what my poker playing friends have told
          me. One notable individual being a professional poker
          player of several years and who has wins in national
          tournaments as well. So he really knows his game. We've
          often talked about the odds of winning and how
          sustainable it is as an income. The figure he gives me is
          around 20% - that is you can only expect to cash in
          around 20% of the competitions you enter. Which means you
          can often go months without seeing a return. However it's
          not just him I've seen give that figure, other players
          I've spoken to have echoed a similar statement.
 
          mistermann - 1 hours ago
          Cash games are completely different than tournaments
          though.
 
          dragonwriter - 3 hours ago
          > The odds work far more favourably when you're betting
          against other players rather than the house.Not in
          general, but skill matters more in a game where the house
          skims off the top (so the players collectively are
          guaranteed to lose the amount the house has decided it
          requires independently of the gains or losses of
          individual players), and there is an element of skill
          influencing the gains and losses between the players.This
          only makes the odds more favorable, though, for a player
          of above average skill for the players they play against;
          it makes them worse for players of below average skill,
          since, after the fixed house take, it still a zero-sum
          game.
 
          drewmol - 3 hours ago
          I've played plenty of poker to supplement my income in
          the past.  There is quite a difference in gambling
          against other players vs against the house.  Casinos are
          not in the business of losing money, so they control odds
          of the game and their gambles to ensure expected gains
          long term.  They take a rake(small portion of the pots)
          from player vs player table games, essentially charging a
          fee for the service of providing a table and dealer.
          Poker is considered a game of skill to most, (you are
          making gambles, but can control the odds of yourself and
          other players by deciding upon wager amounts).  This is
          why you see lots of professional poker players, but not
          slots players.  That said, I found long term play both
          boring and depressing.
 
          downandout - 2 hours ago
          To be fair, there are some professional slot players, and
          many more professional video poker players.  In this [1]
          podcast episode of Gambling With an Edge, they interview
          a guy that has been beating slots professionally for 22
          years.  One of the hosts of the show is a celebrated
          professional video poker player, and the other is a
          professional table games player.  There are as many ways
          to beat casinos as there are games on their floors.[1]
          http://slot-machine-resource.com/podcasts/liston2.mp3
 
        technofiend - 3 hours ago
        The post above me is good advice.  Despite the temptation
        and the fact that it is slightly more in your favor, resist
        the urge to "wrong" bet which is actively betting against
        the player with the dice.  People who play these games can
        be superstitious and don't appreciate your favoring the
        odds over their luck by betting against them.
 
          csa - 3 hours ago
          Absolutely correct.It's only a fraction of a penny in
          your favor for a $10 bet, but it will kill the mood at a
          table in no time.That said, this superstition can be used
          to your advantage. One night there was a really negative
          and obnoxious drunk dude at the other end of the table.
          Every time he was the shooter, my buddy and I bet don't.
          He left the second time we did this. ;-)
 
        davidcbc - 3 hours ago
        Craps really is the best game. It is nice to play a game
        where everyone is on the same team (generally). There is a
        nice camaraderie that goes along with playing craps.Another
        key to go along with this is don't go to the casino to win
        money. Go to the casino to spent $X over the course of Y
        hours to have fun. If you walk away with extra money,
        that's just a bonus.
 
          eric_h - 47 minutes ago
          > don't go to the casino to win moneycouldn't agree with
          this more - gambling is about the ride and the "free"
          drinks you get while you're playing - never bring more
          money than you can afford to lose.Craps is all about the
          whole table having fun playing against the house, and
          it's great fun when everyone is "winning".If you walk
          into a casino with the goal of winning money (without a
          team and an exploit of some sort that actually gives you
          an edge over the house), you're doing it wrong.Even if
          you do have an exploit and a team, don't count on keeping
          your winnings (see Phil Ivey and his baccarat scheme).
 
        rsync - 1 hours ago
        "This is a relatively low variance and no skill way to have
        fun at a casino. The craps table are usually where the fun
        people are."I'll see your low variance casino fun and raise
        you an old defcon
        story:http://phrack.org/issues/54/1.html#articleNot for the
        faint of heart.
 
      beamatronic - 2 hours ago
      For me it's the smoke. And the $10 minimums. Would love to
      find a smoke free casino with $1 minimums.
 
        msie - 1 hours ago
         I believe all the casinos in Vancouver BC are smoke free
        by law. Don't know about the rest of Canada.
 
      r00fus - 4 hours ago
      Casinos are near-perfect skinner boxes [1].  An industry that
      thrives on exploiting human nature and destroying the subject
      in the process, little by little.[1]
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operant_conditioning_chamber
 
        balabaster - 4 hours ago
        What always astounds me when I was in them is that everyone
        seemed oblivious to it.Their need for instant
        gratification, the pleasure centre in their brains
        triggered just enough to keep them ignoring the stress of
        their losses. Distracting them long enough to make them
        think they can win it all back and get back on top.It's
        like playing poker in an interrogation room with a good cop
        and a bad cop. The good cop comes in enough to make you
        think you're okay. It doesn't matter whether you're
        innocent and you only lose a day of work or you're guilty
        and lose your freedom, you still lose.People go in thinking
        they can beat the system and the rare few do, but most
        don't. Overall, the house always wins. That's why the doors
        are still open and they earn yearly profits of millions of
        dollars while a whole bunch of their patrons gradually lose
        their homes and the shirts on their backs.
 
      derefr - 2 hours ago
      > It's like they've lost the will to live and this is their
      last hope at redemption that fades with every token they drop
      into the machines.Consider the Rat Park experiment
      (http://www.stuartmcmillen.com/comic/rat-park/) ? it seems
      "psychological addiction" in general is essentially a way of
      coping with a stressful environment.
 
    eli - 4 hours ago
    I can confirm the same perception seeing people play slot
    machines in US casinos.
 
    beamatronic - 2 hours ago
    You just described Reno, NV. Even at noon there, I felt more at
    risk on the streets than any other place ( SF Tenderloin, etc )
 
  fweespeech - 5 hours ago
  Except in this case, its almost certainly a violation of money
  laundering laws in the US.Tbh, part of me wonders if it would be
  perfectly legal if they sold an actual product at a massive
  markup (say, "designer chocolate"), provided "bonus tokens", and
  allowed refunds of the chocolate even if it was purchased with
  those tokens.I'm not aware of any laws that prevent the
  conversion of tokens to chocolate to refunds. Then again, a
  cryptocurrency is probably less hassle at this point than any of
  these fronts.https://bitcasino.io/And I guess I'm not the only
  one to conclude that.
 
    sokoloff - 5 hours ago
    Though these are generally discussed in terms of their tax or
    financial domain, the step doctrine and substance over form
    doctrines would preclude those actions from being legal just
    because there is an intermediate step inserted.I don't know of
    their specific applicability (or not) w.r.t. money laundering.h
    ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_transaction_doctrine
 
      fweespeech - 5 hours ago
      Fair enough. xD The law isn't something I'm well versed in.
      It just seemed odd that loophole existed in Japan.
 
  Luc - 5 hours ago
  I looked for a picture of these tokens. There's one near the
  bottom of this page:
  https://jenleetravel.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/a-beginners-gu...It
  looks like these might be actual gold chips of 1g and 0.3g...She
  received 8500 yen, about $70 at the time. One gram of gold was
  about $48 at the time so it seems to fit.
 
  armenarmen - 2 hours ago
  I'm finishing a novel where an app has the same functionality for
  street level dealers. Money laundering is fascinating.
 
    kennethologist - 2 hours ago
    Which novel?
 
ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
As I've mentioned before I first encountered transaction hiding in
World of Warcraft. There were 'grey'[1] items in the Auction House
with a buy it now price of 500 gold (which at the time was
extreme). I could not figure out who would buy a twill vest for
500g until it was explained that you went to a web site, paid them
some cash for gold, told them your character name, and then put up
for auction a grey item that was priced at how much gold you had
purchased. One of the vendors 'agents' would then go into the
auction house and buy it. You ended up with your gold and as far as
the game was concerned it was a straight up, if unusual,
transaction between players.[1] Item descriptions were colored,
grey was "trash" and meant to be sold to vendor for cash, "green"
were somewhat nicer/rare, then "blue" for very rare, and "purple"
for epically rare, and "goldenrod" for legendary.
 
  rasz - 1 hours ago
  One of the ways to launder ISK in EVE Online works almost the
  same way. Make ingame contract listing something at ridiculous
  prize, other party buys it, game logs look like "ordinary" game
  scam (EVE is famous for scamming).
 
  splonk - 1 hours ago
  Around 10 years ago before the rise of bitcoin, WoW gold was the
  de facto illicit currency of the internet, since there was a
  reasonably robust market for it.  Things like batches of stolen
  credit cards would routinely be bought and sold in prices
  delineated in WoW gold.According to a Blizzard employee one of my
  coworkers talked to, their chargeback rates were significantly
  higher than even porn sites (15+%, IIRC), to the point that it
  was somewhat surprising that their payment processor was still
  doing business with them.  It's unclear to me if those accounts
  were primarily used to generate mules to facilitate these
  transactions, gold farming, or something else.
 
    wcummings - 43 minutes ago
    Could be that people were buying WoW gold with stolen cards and
    trying to "fence" it before the chargeback.
 
    ChuckMcM - 1 hours ago
    Wow, that is amazing. And it is the first I've heard of the
    high chargeback rates.
 
ajmarsh - 5 hours ago
Nice, maybe I can start playing online poker again here in the US.
Just have to figure out a way to send me my winnings that are not
bolts of fabric.
 
  lazerpants - 5 hours ago
  Just use cryptocurrency. Or VPN into a state that allows it.
 
    ljf - 3 hours ago
    New Jersey (at least)  doesn't just rely on ip now, and need a
    companion app or similar.
 
      lazerpants - 3 hours ago
      Oh wow, I just looked it up and yes, they use a shockingly
      sophisticated system for this now [0]. I suspect you could
      still defeat it, but crypto is absolutely the easier
      option.Funny though, my friends who use Draft Kings were able
      to just VPN into NJ from NY to use it.[0]
      https://www.dailydot.com/business/new-jersey-online-
      gambling...
 
    [deleted]
 
  analogmemory - 2 hours ago
  I've used Cloudbet for sports bets, they have poker too, but
  never used it. (It's all bitcoin)
 
sofaofthedamned - 6 hours ago
Some usenet indexers and pay-for-join torrent sites use similar
fronts to be able to accept PayPal.
 
  kchoudhu - 5 hours ago
  They usually ship you the item. You can pay extra to not receive
  it, which always struck me as odd...
 
    peterlk - 5 hours ago
    If you're using a stolen credit card or fake address or
    whatever and you don't want to create any waves, not shipping
    the item is a value-add.
 
      willstrafach - 4 hours ago
      If you're using a stolen credit card, the cardholder will
      definitely issue a chargeback.
 
        CamperBob2 - 1 hours ago
        And then people wonder why PayPal is such a pain in the ass
        to do business with...
 
          willstrafach - 21 minutes ago
          It would really be any payment processor. When a
          chargeback is filed with the credit card company, they
          claw back the cash from PayPal.
 
          jeltz - 1 hours ago
          And this is why everyone should start requiring 3D
          Secure. On sites with 3D Secure support I need to use an
          app to authorize transactions, so if this was the norm
          online credit card fraud would be a much smaller problem.
 
    kronos29296 - 5 hours ago
    Nowadays most of them also have a bitcoin address as it is
    safer. Less hassle. Atleast this way you don't have to pay
    extra to not receive stuff you don't need anyway...
 
[deleted]
 
pdelbarba - 6 hours ago
"Reuters examination has found" => we called the help desk and they
said "yea, we don't sell anything, we're a front you dummy"
 
  dmurray - 1 hours ago
  It's a weakness in the system, because the help desk employees
  have to be trained to tell people "yes I know it says
  MyFabricFactory on your credit card bill, but that was actually
  your deposit to our gambling website" because they get that call
  all the time and they need to be able to put the customers at
  ease rather than have them call Visa to dispute the transaction.
 
deckar01 - 5 hours ago
Customer support gave up the con on a phone call? I imagine with a
little more effort they could have been indistinguishable from a
legitimate business.
 
  pilsetnieks - 5 hours ago
  They wouldn't be very good at serving their "legitimate"
  customers then:Customer: "Hi, umm, it looks like I'm not getting
  my winnings from pokerfastlane dot com, can you help me with
  that?"Support rep: "I'm sorry sir, we are a fabrics import/export
  company, we have no relation to pokerfastlane dot com."C: "But
  they gave me this number..."SR: "I'm sorry, I can help you only
  with fabrics related matters. Perhaps I could interest you in a
  nice afghan?"
 
  dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
  > Customer support gave up the con on a phone call?They kind of
  have to, since the whole purpose of the support number seems to
  be to reassure people who know they paid ?MyIllegalPokerSite.com?
  but see a charge on their bill from
  ?MyTotallyLegitFabricStore.com? that the charge corresponds to
  their payment to the poker site, and that they shouldn't contest
  the charges as fraudulent with their card issuer.
 
    draw_down - 4 hours ago
    Yeah. This scheme makes it seem easy to issue a chargeback
    though, gamblers can just tell their credit card co "I have no
    idea who FabricFactory.com is". I wonder how/if they prevent
    gambling customers from doing that.
 
      dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
      From the article, they told the reporter that they handled
      virtually all online gambling transactions; they might just
      accept a certain level of it and then blacklist the customer.
      (They might even let a customer suggesting that they might
      issue a chargeback know that that is the consequence.)
 
        ljf - 3 hours ago
        It is also very hard to withdraw money from illegal
        gambling sites. It can be done, but is often a slow drawn
        out process, to get you as close as possible to the date
        that you can't cancel. Also don't forget that these are
        dodgy people who have your home address... And know you've
        been breaking the law - likely with also some tax issues
        too on the winnings.
 
          willstrafach - 2 hours ago
          I believe they usually have a 90-day waiting period for
          withdrawals if you load via credit card (instead of
          Western Union or BTC), helping them ensure the user does
          not perform a chargeback.
 
      willstrafach - 2 hours ago
      Some of these websites would collect the national ID cards of
      users and post them on a "wall of shame" if the user does a
      chargeback.
 
strathmeyer - 6 hours ago
Ok who here hasn't ordered "something" from Europe that showed up
on your credit card to some ecommerce site selling overpriced
ipods? Let this be a lesson to you kids, try anything unscrupulous
and the feds will catch up to you in a couple of decades.
 
  dsfyu404ed - 6 hours ago
  I ordered a pump typically used in dialysis machines for a
  project that happened to require a pump of that nature.  It came
  from some former Soviet republic and had been opened and examined
  by customs in a handful of countries (as evidenced by layers of
  cut tape and identifying tape and stickers placed on it when it
  was deemed passable).  I wonder if after the first customs
  official inspected it all the subsequent countries decided if it
  was good enough to be of interest to the prior country they had
  better open it up and take a look as well.I'm not sure if stuff
  like that is highly regulated but I was able to just buy it on
  eBay and it got to me no problem so it was pretty painless.Based
  on purchases a friend of mine alleges one of his friends had made
  the really shady "somethings" go through .onion sites using
  bitcoin.
 
benologist - 5 hours ago
How could a platform detect this kind of "transaction laundering"?
 
djhworld - 3 hours ago
I feel really stupid, can someone explain to me what people are
allegedly doing here?My understanding is a Poker company (for
example) puts all transactions from US customers through these fake
stores. Then the organisation running the fake stores reimburses
the Poker company outside of the US and takes a small slice for the
service?
 
  [deleted]
 
  mongmong - 3 minutes ago
  I would think this is primarily to hide gambling activities so it
  doesn't affect your credit score. If you're applying for a loan
  or credit card your bank statements can be assessed and if it
  finds transactions to known gambling sites or ATM withdrawals
  from known gambling venues or hotels then that will affect your
  credit rating badly.
 
  dmurray - 1 hours ago
  The poker company puts transactions (deposits, anyway) through
  the fake stores. The organisation running the fake stores may
  well be the poker company or a wholly owned subsidiary, so they
  don't necessarily keep a cut.If they took deposits in their own
  name, the credit card companies and banks would refuse to do
  business with them.
 
  willstrafach - 2 hours ago
  Credit card details are passed to a "payment processor" who uses
  one of these storefronts who have a legitimate merchant account
  (due to their legit-enough looking website), they charge the
  cards and load credits into online poker accounts.
 
[deleted]